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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/24/2018 in all areas

  1. Well, the collapsee amazed us all by climbing the stairs this morning and making himself toast and coffee in the kitchen. Apart from a couple of temporary aids to assist, he ticked all the boxes and will be discharged on Sunday. He's very lucky. For a man who came very close to death, his only medication is Levothyroxine. All this has made him think...as it should...about how much his 6 weeks in hospital has cost the NHS. It made him realise, too, how hard those employees work and how short staffed they are. His treatment, scans, bed, meals and everything else would have amounted t
    6 points
  2. And I wish you well, Banjo. My oncologist told me that if you had to have cancer, the best one is prostate because they have many alternative treatments. My experience was different to yours. When it was confirmed that I did have PC, my attitude was 'Oh well, let's see how it goes'. The biopsy was straight forward. A camera and a snipper was inserted up me back-end and he took ten samples, only half of which I felt, as a pin prick. No radiotherapy for me as the cancer has broken out of the prostate (metasticised) and spread. Warning! don't leave it too late before getting you
    4 points
  3. Here's a cracking picture of the top of Woodborough Road showing Mapperley Methodist Church and the top of Porchester Road - hope it inspires some memories
    3 points
  4. We’ve been waiting for weeks for a large rug we’d seen in John Lewis to be back in stock, waiting patiently for an email informing us that it’s available again. Today we decided to go into the shop for a little browse and the staff were moving everything around, finding room for garden furniture (for heaven’s sake!) The rug we really wanted was still on display in a room setting so we asked if we could have THAT one. No problem they said, we bought it 50% off. Ok, it’s been walked on for a while but that’s what rugs are for, and it’s not grubby at all. Result! It looks the bizz too!
    3 points
  5. The old Home Brewery building in Daybrook, which is used by Notts County Council, is to be made available for commercial offices. The Council is to commission a feasibility study regarding this at a cost of £50,000. Having seen the building and having been inside I can confirm that the idea is perfectly feasible. To whom do I write to claim the £50,000?
    2 points
  6. English wasn't their strong point.
    2 points
  7. Chulla. The chat up line would have to have had the offer of 'Half a Bitter and lime and a Parkie or two' or I was off. Hydrogen peroxide fueled exit.
    2 points
  8. Wool Shetland Shawls was started by The Framework Knitters in Hucknall in the 1850's. It was extended to Beeston and Chilwell by two Hucknall men, William Limb and Frank Wilkinson..
    2 points
  9. The image below is of the fastest fighter aircraft in World War Two- 600 mph. It was powered by a rocket engine that used hydrogen peroxide mixed with water as its fuel. No doubt HP enabled you, carni, to make a fast getaway from lads whose chat-up line wasn't favourable.
    2 points
  10. Going from my 1965 vintage GCE 'O' level French.. Chanson Triste = 'Sad Song'.
    2 points
  11. That's the one LL. I think I spelt it with my eyes closed.
    2 points
  12. Enjoyed many a meal in the Arcade, it was a nice place to go at the time Here's a bit of hype from when it opened
    2 points
  13. Thanks for the responses. It did surprise me that this was a new subject. I recall that Hucknall shawls had the reputation of being the finest of any available and it was possible to pass a shawl through a wedding ring they were so fine. This was going some as the shawl was usually about 1 yard square (just less than on metre square). It might not seem quite so astounding nowadays but remember the best shawls were made from mohair or alpaca or some other very expensive natural fibre. I have a vague idea that the shawl factory I remember had a royal warrant outside but I may be mistak
    2 points
  14. Amongst other things “Wong” is a long narrow strip of land. Probably Anglo Saxon. There is a Willow Wong in Burton Joyce.
    2 points
  15. Road/street names ending in "Wong" are a bit older than you'd think (there are some "wongs" in other places in Notts). As an etymological dictionary says.... Etymology of wong Middle English, from Old English wong, wang; akin to Old High German -wang field, Old Norse vangr garden, field, Gothic
    2 points
  16. Is that what they mean when they say, we pulled the rug from under their feet!
    2 points
  17. Banjo, so sorry you've had such a difficult time over the last few weeks but it's good that the cancer is contained. I hope the radiotherapy course won't be too traumatic for you - please keep letting us know how it goes. Sharing your experiences on here with relative strangers can be helpful, I think. And then, the loss of your dog..... I feel for you, as do many on here I suspect. Pets become part of the family, don't they... Thinking of you x
    2 points
  18. Much is made of Nottingham Lace but shawl making in Hucknall, although world-famous at the time, seems to be all but forgotten. I was very surprised to not find any mention of shawl making on here before and I wonder if anyone has any memories or reminiscences they can share? I remember one shawl factory on or near Albert St. but I know there were others, perhaps closed before I became aware of shawl making as part of the Hucknall (and Nottinghamshire) heritage. Timewise, my memory takes me to 1950's - early 60's
    1 point
  19. Couldn’t think of anywhere else to post this. Old films and documentaries on Nottingham. Don’t know whether it’s already been seen. https://player.bfi.org.uk/search/free?q=Nottingham
    1 point
  20. Crikey Cliff, going to have to check my spelling and punctuation from now on - didn't realise we were being tested!
    1 point
  21. When I worra lad, les Kellet and mick McManus came into my Gran's café courtesy of Reg King, who was a great friend of the family. And I got autographs and tickets to see the wrestling at the ice rink.
    1 point
  22. Might have saved yourself an 'explosive' ending, Carni.
    1 point
  23. I bet their ears never got blocked up either. No barley sugar sweeties for them to suck!
    1 point
  24. I hope it was no more than 4%!
    1 point
  25. I remember the shawl factory at the corner of Albert Street and The Connery. I cannot remember the name of the owners for sure but Calladines seems familiar. My grandma lived in Albert Street in the fifties and I remember walking by the factory on my way to the little shop that was on the corner of Titchfield Street. In those days there was no Leisure Centre, just the Wreck where two fairs a year came and countless cricket and football games were played by local kids.
    1 point
  26. When the Playhouse opened in 1963(?) main organisers – John Neville, Peter Ustinov and Frank Dunlop were very keen to get a young contingent of followers for the theatre so they formed, I think it was called, The Playhouse Club or it may have been The Young Playhouse. Either way, it was an informal group of 16 – 25 year olds who paid a small weekly sum (sixpence or so) to entitle them to a Saturday morning workshop (most, but no all Saturdays), reduced price tickets to most stage performances (except first nights) and very much reduced or even free admission to Student Previews which were held
    1 point
  27. We've had a very busy morning running the Toddler Group at church - 2 helpers were ill so Paul and I have been run off our feet since we set it all up from 8.30am. We got home at 1.15pm after clearing up. Now we've got to make the 15 mile trip (up to an hour depending on traffic) to Addenbrookes hospital as I have an appointment at 4pm for a biopsy. I won't say exactly where, but I might have trouble sitting comfortably for a while! On the way home from the hospital, we're picking up our daughter from Cambridge to bring her here for a couple of days, then we have our church house group at
    1 point
  28. Two wongs don't make a right, though!
    1 point
  29. Yesterday was a bit busy. Phone never stopped ringing with people sharing their feelngs over my former colleague's sudden death. Then both daughters called a few times to make sure I was OK after the 'shunt'. Then lots of calls regarding insurance on my car and also fitted in attendance at the funeral of a very good Liverpool friend who was something of a legend in Liverpool pubs. A true gent. Then I shot over to my usual MOT garage in Newton le Willows, the owner of which also likes his Hondas. His opinion is that my car just needs a new bumper painting and fitting. The problem is that
    1 point
  30. Although I have no information of Hucknall shawl making there is a family run business in Chillwell of shawl makers G H Hurt. They have been around since the early 1900s and were the makers of Prince Georges shawl he was wrapped in on leaving Hospital.
    1 point
  31. Jonab, I think that is the first time anyone has mentioned shawls, lots of lace and knitwear mentions, but when you think of the olden days, most women wore a shawl. Someone had to make them.
    1 point
  32. I wonder why, Albert pierrpont never did any hangings at Nottingham!. Although he did at Lincoln and Leicester prisons? Edit I know the answer, Nottingham city council wouldn't spend money on anything that makes sense. They were saving up for some rubbish ideas!!.
    1 point
  33. Dave, Banjo and anyone else suffering. I wish you all well. Col
    1 point
  34. My knowledge of Hucknall is non-existent, but a map from the mid 50s shows a "Knitwear Factory & Hosiery Works" on Albert Street, so it looks like your memory is correct....
    1 point
  35. Given you a like jonab because your topic brings us back on course re Notstalgia. Sorry I cannot offer any input. It was all hosiery where I lived in Radford - three factories within 50 yards. Someone must know about the Shawl makers?
    1 point
  36. Your story of diagnosis is very familiar Banjo, the same happened to my husband, he also ended up with septicaemia following the biopsy and spent several days in City Hospital, and not remembering anything of those days. He was told he had ‘aggressive’ Prostate Cancer. He had the 37 radiotherapy sessions, as is the norm, and that is now 5 years ago. He doesn’t need to see the oncologist until later this year, which will be 12 months since the last blood tests. We wish you all the best and look forward to seeing you here in Nottingham in a few months time.
    1 point
  37. I dread Christmas too, Banjo and the last one was pure hell due to the collapse of a close friend, blue lighting to hospital and everything else going wrong. I'm very sorry to hear of the loss of your faithful friend. I know the heartache that brings only too well. The collapsee is coming on a visit this morning with his occupational therapists to assess how well he can cope with a stay at my abode prior to going home. I suspect he won't manage the stairs and a hospital bed will be necessary. Looks like I'll be doing some furniture moving!
    1 point
  38. Chulla I wish you well mate. End of November I had my usual annual blood tests, here in oz we have a them as a normal screening test for any nasties that may show up. All good till I get the call from my GP asking me to make an appointment, well my PSA appeared to have jumped a bit so rather then embarrass the both of us (my doc is a female) she made me an appointment to see a male urologist. Long story short story, I had 3D MRI which found a lesion so then the dreaded biopsy which not only gave me septicemia and a 4 day hospital stay on intravenous antibiotics, but diagn
    1 point
  39. If only laptops and spreadsheets had been around then! The only computers I ever saw in those days were hugh reel to reel machines situated behind glass in air conditioned rooms accessible only to the operators. The first one I saw was in the Nottingham City Treasurer’s Department. At the Water Department, which was then run by the City Council, they were still living in the Victorian era with tall sloping desks and men sitting on stools writing in hugh bound ledgers. The youngsters may call us silver surfers and think we don’t understand computing but some of us have been involved with the e
    1 point
  40. Col, only just read your post about your friend's death - it must have been a shock especially as they weren't that old. Also sorry to hear about your beloved car being bumped - not the same as a death, of course, but definitely upsetting. Mexico sounds exciting - as you say "start saving up". If it's a holiday that really appeals to you, then go for it..
    1 point
  41. Nice flower pictures, Chulla. I've learnt something from the info on the bluebell.... I knew the stems were slimy inside but I never knew the slime was used long ago as a glue to stick feathers on arrows. If I'm out walking with the grandchildren and see the larger bindweed, we always have to pick a few flowers and stalks and make them into 'ladies'. (You turn the flower upside down so it looks like a dress, them poke a separate piece of stem from one side to the other to make the arms. There you have it - a lady in a white dress with a green cap on her head). My mum showed me how
    1 point
  42. When I was a bottle blonde in the 60s (as in my avatar) The colourant I used was Hiltone and Hydrogen Peroxide. I'm surprised I still have any hair left, because it had to be redone every two weeks. Roots were frowned on in those days! Got my natural shade of blonde now........it's called grey! LL, if you use it, at least you will have clean tabs, might turn the old grey matter a nice shade of blonde, but definitely nice and clean.
    1 point
  43. Several were on Freeview over Christmas. Terry Thomas, Ian Carmichael, Jeanette Scott, Alistair Sim et al. Proper entertainment !
    1 point
  44. Thanks for the encouragement. Of concern is the fact that my PSA score is now higher than when I was first diagnosed four years ago (not three years as I previously said). This did not seem to bother the oncologist, who said it was not unusual. He said that they had a number of treatments to try, but for the time being he just changed the steroid, and said he would see me in 12 weeks time. So doesn't seem to be any urgency. On the positive side my nails have grown back and my hair is coming back nicely. I like it when my appointments are in the 11 to 12 o'clock period because I ca
    1 point
  45. Thanks Col. I'm not always politically correct. Just that there are enough problems in this old world so no point setting out to hurt somebody's feelings or offend them. I make it a point to try not to do that.
    1 point
  46. A couple more. Facing the front, with Shakespeare Street behind the photographer. On the far left is the pub which had various names including 'The Regent'. To the side of the Atkey's advert is the entrance to the famous footbridge through the roof. A bit blurry; the main booking hall.
    1 point
  47. Obviously I copied the wrong box - I'll try again
    1 point
  48. .....which is where they still are today, on the corner of Bennett Road. Something I've just noticed which adds to - and partly explains - some of the confusion. At least up to the 1960s, the road at Mapperley Top was called Plains Road on one side and Woodborough Road on the other. Like this...
    1 point
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