Joy James

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Everything posted by Joy James

  1. Hi Nick.....guess what I got for Christmas? Wrong! Bronchitis! My lungs sound like the tube during rush hour and hanging over the washbasin coughing while trying to clear them has put me on personal eye to eye contact with the plug hole which seems to be a really interesting sub culture! ..........and yes I've got a few of those Clubman's Gazettes c/o writer and ventriloquist Val Terry. I'd love to see yours!
  2. Pssst.... (no I'm not!) Wanna know where the best fish and chips are to be had? The PLOUGH at Farnsfield!
  3. Hi Stan, can't recall my teacher at leaving point but know that my first one was Miss Castle. Dad said her big red nose was the result of drink (my fam were tee total) and he'd seen her staggering out of a pub in town so ever after that I knew she was drunk when she taught me! (Taps the side of her nose sagely!) U must realise that we were very parochial back then and if you didn't live on Moffat street I'd barely know you! None of the names ring a bell but I do recall the Moffat Street Evan's (David, Rae, Lena) Browns (Barbara, Beryl, Maureen and Bub) Dunns of Pym street (Christine, Tony Evelyn). The kids today have it so easy to stay in touch, back then there being no communication whatsoever, when you moved house, even by a mere street or two, you virtually dropped off the edge of the world!
  4. Hello Nottstalgia's. Yesterday was my 76th birthday so I am getting on a bit now and though fairly competent pc wise, I do have trouble understanding and finding my way round this site. My fault entirely. Big thanks to Kath James (we James girls gotta stick together....) for telling me I had messages here. I had a lovely day yesterday! Quite the best birthday ever! It began by being told my hearing is shot, just how shot I didn't know till they put those ugly brown bits in my tabs. I instantly realised how noisy the world really is....mine is usually so peaceful as the sound seems to come through a cushion! My kitchen clock is over 40 yrs old and I never knew it ticked!!! Ditto the one in the lounge. I am an early riser - usually just about 3am - and today I switched on my world of sound and though I've lived in this house since 1968, never knew my bedroom floorboards creak! So my lovely birthday continued with a lunch engagement with my good friend Jenny who had splashed out a HUGE sum for a bottle of my fav perfume Oscar De La Renta! Bliss. There CAN only be one place to go for the BEST fish and chips and its the PLOUGH at Farnsfield. Ohhhh fish and chips to die for! I got talking to a few diners and related the following; I'd had an interesting Colwick car boot the previous day and had stopped to look at something and the male booter had said I could have that for a fiver. What? The bike, I can't ride a bike. Everybody can ride a bike. As a kid, I didn't have shoes on my feet or a coat on my back & I didn't have one friend with a bike, so never had the opportunity. You can learn. Too late, I'm a big woman and we are talking broken bones if I fall off. You are not a big woman you have a lovely figure! Shocked, I walked very close to him and whispered, 'I don't know whether to thank you or f--k you!' He roared with laughter and said he was here for the rest of the day....I told him to get on his bike. The story went round the Plough and Bob, the owner/chef came out to see what was happening with the laughter. I repeated the tale and he sat down with us and we all chatted like old friends. One chap took an interest in me and asked was I married and I said no, how many times married and I said two and he asked did I want a third hubby? He disappeared and came back with a bouquet of flowers he'd nicked out of the Plough garden, and sang an Elvis impression of The Wonder of you and ended with the Happy birthday song. As I left, Bob gave me a HUGE bottle of champagne! ....Like I said, quite the best birthday ever...... Mind, Daily Mail readers might have spotted my letter in their letters column yesterday...if so, you know its not been my best week.......
  5. Sally Slick Slack on London road...The Meadows?? Not a hop skip and a jump from Sneinton Market is it? GOODBYE DRURY HILL & SNEINTON MARKET Why did they pull down Drury Hill? Why waste it that infamous day? From Weekday Cross to old Broad Marsh it had ever led the way. Small it was and oh so steep, but worthy of this humble ditty, with tiny footpath, this cobbled street, run down yet oh so pretty. Never could a car get past, its road being far too narrow, the only traffic built for it, were feet and the odd wheelbarrow. A bookshop stood here, a dress shop on the right, a cobblers and clockmakers too, and traders lived behind their shops, though of comforts there were few. In summer the sun was warm and kind and bathed it in golden light, But it was postcard pretty when frosted over in glorious winter white. Slippy it was sometimes and I took the odd tumble there. But it didn’t ever stop me using that ancient thoroughfare. But ‘they’ thought it in the way and would stop their shopping mall, so they took a vote and sent this street cruelly to the wall. This lovely place was flattened by the stroke of a pen never to be seen by the light of day again. Oh later they said they were sorry, it had been a big mistake! And now the market at Sneinton has been dealt the same horrid fate. The market we once knew and loved the council have seen it off! Twas frequented for centuries by the poor man and the toff. It’s supported thousands of families, clothed and fed many more. Kept Nottingham City going, right through the second world war. Through all these many centuries, of the market folk t’was said, 'They stood out in all weathers to earn their daily bread.’ Jacky Pownall sold baskets of pots, he’d haul them up on his hip, throw them high in the air and they’d crash down with never a chip. I’m glad old Sally Slick Slacks gone, all alone she just sold rags. A tanner for a bunch of lace, earned enough for her pint and fags! ‘Reg the veg’ stood near the school, everyone’s mate, no-body's fool. Tough as old boots who midst the clamour, filled old folks bags and said “Gi' us a tanner.” I went there wi’ our mam once, she bought me a cardi of blue. I’d never owned anything before of so soft and pretty a hue. She paid a penny halfpenny and I wore it with great pride, till she washed and spoilt it and I cried and cried and cried. And shoes I got with ankle straps, brown leather with a shine. On showing them to my friend Pat, she said “They once were mine.” Every market manager, be he Joseph , Sam or Jack, was always known as ‘Toby’, bet a quid you didn’t know that. And there have been hundreds of ‘Toby’s’, on that market through many a year, but on their death bed you can be sure; the council won’t shed a tear. Oh Sneinton I shall miss you, your noise and friendly chatter, some brave folk tried to stop them but it was far too late to matter. They’ll swap this institution f or high gloss granite and chrome and fancified upholstery of chipboard and coloured foam. Oh there’ll be gyms and fancy shops, of those we have enough and to folk like me who mourn its loss, the council men say ‘Tough!’ And not too far along the years, trust me, just you wait, some council man will make his name and say it’s out of date! I know not who thought this one up, by face nor yet by name, but I sincerely hope I live to see you hang your head in shame.
  6. Sally Slick Slack on London road...The Meadows?? Not a hop skip and a jump from Sneinton Market is it? GOODBYE DRURY HILL & SNEINTON MARKET Why did they pull down Drury Hill? Why waste it that infamous day? From Weekday Cross to old Broad Marsh it had ever led the way. Small it was and oh so steep, but worthy of this humble ditty, with tiny footpath, this cobbled street, run down yet oh so pretty. Never could a car get past, its road being far too narrow, the only traffic built for it, were feet and the odd wheelbarrow. A bookshop stood here, a dress shop on the right, a cobblers and clockmakers too, and traders lived behind their shops, though of comforts there were few. In summer the sun was warm and kind and bathed it in golden light, But it was postcard pretty when frosted over in glorious winter white. Slippy it was sometimes and I took the odd tumble there. But it didn’t ever stop me using that ancient thoroughfare. But ‘they’ thought it in the way and would stop their shopping mall, so they took a vote and sent this street cruelly to the wall. This lovely place was flattened by the stroke of a pen never to be seen by the light of day again. Oh later they said they were sorry, it had been a big mistake! And now the market at Sneinton has been dealt the same horrid fate. The market we nce knew and loved the council have seen it off, frequented for centuries by the poor man and the toff. It’s supported thousands of families, clothed and fed many more. Kept Nottingham City going, right through the second world war. Through all these many centuries, of the market folk t’was said, 'They stood out in all weathers to earn their daily bread.’ Jacky Pownall sold baskets of pots, he’d haul them up on his hip, throw them high in the air and they’d crash down with never a chip. I’m glad old Sally Slick Slacks gone, all alone she just sold rags. A tanner for a bunch of lace, earned enough for her pint and fags! ‘Reg the veg’ stood near the school, everyone’s mate, no-body's fool. Tough as old boots who midst the clamour, filled old folks bags and said “Gi' us a tanner.” I went there wi’ our mam once, she bought me a cardi of blue. I’d never owned anything before of so soft and pretty a hue. She paid a penny halfpenny and I wore it with great pride, till she washed and spoilt it and I cried and cried and cried. And shoes I got with ankle straps, brown leather with a shine. On showing them to my friend Pat, she said “They once were mine.” Every market manager, be he Joseph , Sam or Jack, was always known as ‘Toby’, bet a quid you didn’t know that. And there have been hundreds of ‘Toby’s’, on that market through many a year, but on their death bed you can be sure; the council won’t shed a tear. Oh Sneinton I shall miss you, your noise and friendly chatter, some brave folk tried to stop them but it was far too late to matter. They’ll swap this institution f or high gloss granite and chrome and fancified upholstery of chipboard and coloured foam. Oh there’ll be gyms and fancy shops, of those we have enough and to folk like me who mourn its loss, the council men say ‘Tough!’ And not too far along the years, trust me, just you wait, some council man will make his name and say it’s out of date! I know not who thought this one up, by face nor yet by name, but I sincerely hope I live to see you hang your head in shame.
  7. I have to say though I recall a somewhat different kind of Sally Slick Slack. She'd push the pram up and down St Ann's Well road and sometimes she had a dog in there which she cooed to as if it was a baby. Never mind the weather, she wore what she wanted. I recall once seeing her on the hottest day of the year and she was wearing a heavy fur coat. Our dad told her she was mad wearing a coat that heavy in this heat and she went for him. She screamed that she had a paper from Mapperley hospital and it proved that she wasn't mad. She dived in the pram and bought out a tattered piece of yellow paper and waved it under dads nose then asked and had he got one? No he hadn't, of course and she cackled with laughter and called out "Now whose mad?" Joy James
  8. I have found this which is attributed to W J MELVIN They called her Sally Slick Slack a character girl was she She tramped around Sneinton Market place to see what she could see. Her goal was was getting bits of sticks to put in her old black pram and she'd often beg a fish box off a market man. and the market men would tease her as she went about her way they would shout and ask her 'Hows your sticks?' and you would hear her say.... "Mind your bish nish mind your bish nish in her funny sort of way "it'chs nowt cla blummin do wi' yo; it'chs mine tae gi' away." She'd totter off up Carlton road in a shuffle sort of way with her long black dress and sugar sack apron and to herself she'd say "it'chs nowt cla blummin do wi' yo; it'chs mine tae gi' away". She would keep on talking to herself in her clacky Victorian way wearing a small Victorian hat and a long pin so they say. Her gait was old and shuffled a character girl she may and as she trundled with her pram You wished her 'a good day.' She'd look at you and in her funny kind of way Would tell you "Mind yer bish nish, It'ch's mine ter gi' away."
  9. Hi folks,I am looking to hold a COLMANS'aka CLINTON ROOMS reunion in the spring.Did you go there way back then? Sneak in on ‘grab a granny’ night? Or were you one of the glamorous ladies and there were plenty, come on, ‘fess up! Maybe you were one of the more sedate Saturday or Sunday clients? Do you recall me? I bet I knew YOU! I was a regular & probably danced the barn dance with you. It was quite a place and is missed even today. My new book THE DAYS OF WINE AND POSEURS! takes you back to those long gone days.Where are you now Oz, John, Graham, Berny, Steve, Tony, Farmer Giles? Jackie, Molly, June, Micki, Jenny & Sylvy? All well I hope. I am because I’ve just had the most exciting 18 mths of my life due to the books I‘ve written about my life in Nottingham during the past decades and the texts, emails, letters and phone calls from you saying how I’ve invoked such memories in you all. I talk about life ‘way back when’ in your libraries, ‘stutes & other social groups and its been great fun meeting up again with folk I’ve not seen for years & at times I’ve been saddened (and shed more than a few tears) to learn that some of us didn’t make it this far. I’ve taken you back to a war torn St Ann’s of the ‘40’s in YO’D MEK A PARSON SWEAR!, ‘50’s Broxtowe in ‘YO’D MEK A PARSON SWEAR AGAIN! & ‘60’s ‘Hyson Green and Clifton in ‘BOG ALL TO SWEAR ABOUT!’
  10. ISN'T IT TIME THIS SITE HAD A CLEAN UP? THERE ARE ITEMS ON IT THAT WERE WRITTEN LAST YEAR AND BEFORE AND SHOULD NO LONGER BE IN VIEW, I AM THINKING IN PARTICULAR OF THE GUY SEEKING HELP TO CLEAR HIS DECEASED FATHER'S HOUSE. HOW PAINFUL THAT MUST BE TO THE MAN IN QUESTION.
  11. Thanks for this, I couldn't half have made use of it when I was writing my 2nd book.
  12. Yes its on every Sunday and I have been a fan of it and rarely missed it ever since it opened and have bought some lovely stuff. Only 2 wks ago I bought a designer made, never been worn, hand knitted, full length coat for £4. I looked the label up on the net and it cost £145! How about we start a topic off about the oddest things seen at a boot? How about a coffin at Colwick!!! and a parachute!! (think about it...it fails to open and you go where to get your redress?)
  13. You were right, it was Hazleford Ferry.
  14. Nolly was quite a man. I recall our last conversation when he told me about his (2nd?) wife having twins. He told me all about the boat and begged me to go and see him. He described how he was moored at Hoveringham ferry on the bend of the river and had rigged up the sound of the Queen Mary fog horn and relayed it through loudspeakers on his deck. He said he would wait until it got to evening and as the mist was rising waited until he could hear the tiny chug of a small boat nearing the bend and then play the 'BOOOOO---OOOOOM' sound full blast and the hapless boat owner would sh1t himself as he rounded the bend. He was a bloody idiot.
  15. I am on my third 'Swear' book and have reached the time, mid to late 60's when I was the resident singer at the Musters. I am stuck for the names of some of the first class keyboard players. I recall Burt Hartley, Austin (HELP!), The drummers....I can only bring to mind one they called Elvis and the infamous Nolly Buck. HELP FOLKS.
  16. Hiya folks, out in the garden today I saw a black butterfly. It was quite small, wings about the size of that common small blue one I somrtimes see, and dainty and seemed to have either a lomg body or a long tail. Anyone know what it was? I have never seen anything like that before. Joy James
  17. I am fairly new to this writing game and only wrote my first document as a history for my children and grandchildren. It was only when a friend viewed it and thought it should have a wider audience that I decided to publish it as YO'D MEK A PARSON SWEAR and folk seem to like it - so much so they began to ask, 'What happened next?' Mam moved us to what she called 'Posh Broxta', well it was in those days and we not only had our own INDOOR toilet but a kitchen sink with real hot water via the wonder of the age, the ASCOT!!!! The 2nd book YO'D MEK A PARSON SWEAR...AGAIN! deals with living on Whitwell Road Broxtowe.
  18. Help you Gossers! Am writing my third book and am trying to find a Nottingham man by the name of PERRY CARL for info only he would know. He is a well known singer in and around these shores. Also, does anyone remember the Malc Allen Sextet who worked at the Commodore in the 60's? In particular the saxe player who made up the Allen part of their name and who emigrated to New Zealand (I think) in the late 60's? Have just rung Malcolm and that phone number is ominously no longer available.
  19. It was the new book launch yesterday and it was gratifying to see so mnay people come and join me. I am often asked if these are true tales of my life and in the 2nd book there is a story of getting my very first new coat. I went with a friend on the Saturday morning and finally chose a white one!!!!...more, I could not wait to wear it and C&A bagged up my old one. We crossed over to Woolworths and I bought a pair of red dice dangling earrings. Convinced the whole world was lloking at me and admiring my new coat I went to cross the road again and the pair of us got bowled over by a motor bike. White coat...motor bike? No contest. At the launch yesterday who should turn up but my coat buying friend Pat Newman whom I have not seen these last 20 yrs. It was a wonderful reunion.
  20. You were right on the location and I have a piccie taken in Jan 1946 of the entrance which was via the front of the owners bunglaow, up for sale at that time. There is a man (the owner?) standing in the front of the house and he has decorated the front 'garden' with what looks to be the entire contents of a graveyard, statues of cherubs and angels, urns etc. I have tried to upload it but for some reason it won't go. I also have a fishing ticket which looks as though ti was issued yesterday which cost 6d and ditto on the upload. Grrrrrr
  21. Now now boys, settle down......lets not have bloodshed eh?
  22. I remember the Moo Cow well but only went into it once. That was enough. It was the IN place , the cliche 'anyone who was anyone' frequented it but oh it was mucky. It was all Americanised as I recall and done up in gaudy pastel colours but the fag smoke quickly dulled everything to dark orange. I have just released my 2nd book YO'D MEK A PARSON SWEAR...AGAIN! and one of the incidents in that book is centred on that cafe.
  23. Oh ye of little faith!! I once repaired a light fitting with the cup off a flask! Don't ask. Thanks anyway but I have great faith in my DIY job! Nevertheless, I will note that number down. My lawn is a BIG one and I fully expected it to stop at any given second but it didn't. The stuff I have used is a very strong rigid and hard nylon tape with hard nylon 'hooks' on it which have given it more grip. I hope that if it wasn't going to hold it would have stopped sooner rather than later. Now bedded in , its stuck like the proverbial wottsit to a blanket!
  24. I have EXACTLY the same prob! I just try again and it goes through immediately. I have just solved a really difficult prob through a Eureka moment and its a corking solution and so simple....so can anyone tell me how to make a DIY posting of interest to all? (Why does this site have to be so difficult?? ) Oh done it....put it under DIY..
  25. I have just repaired a lawn mower I was advised to dump!!!!! Its a JCB, only about 2 yrs old, but lets put that in perspective and say that its probably only done about 8 hours work!! I took it to pieces (as far as I could) and realised it was the belt slipping. I have spend hours over the last 2 days chasing a fan belt, online, at specialist merchants and B&Q where I bought it. I even went to far as to phone JCB itself (0870 number of course) and after a lengthy wait got a chap who went away and was gone for about 5 more minutes and came back and told me he did not have a blade for that particular model I had asked for a fan belt! Off he goes again and ditto on the 5 more minutes wait to be told no, they had none. On the verge of giving in and buying another mower, I looked in my kitchen drawer and the answer jumped out at me. I have a length of TOUGH sticky backed velcro. I used the HOOK side of it, glued it on the bigger of the 2 fan belt 'wheels' and bingo!! Cracked it. It roars like a lion now....and it cuts the grass!