Roosta

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About Roosta

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    North Devon

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  1. Some local items up for auction here on the 8th. http://www.gwra.co.uk/nextauction.htm
  2. As a first form pupil at Henry Mellish Grammar in the early 60s we had a particularly nasty teacher whose speciality was to lift a boy to his feet by the hair and then slap him round the face as hard as possible. I received this treatment once for saying a single word to the lad next to me and have never forgotten it. There were quite a few sadistic teachers at the schools I attended. Saw canes smashed over boys heads and one lads head cut open by a flying board rubber. To be fair there were also some truly inspirational teachers too.
  3. High tea to me in 1950s Nottingham meant tea eaten round the fire, usually on a Sunday evening and consisted of something like sardines on toast or toast and dripping (the proper stuff with the meat jelly at the bottom) followed by cake.Seemed like a real treat compared to everyday tea.
  4. As a child in the 50s my favourite book was 'Ferdinand the Bull' by Munro Leaf. Banned in Spain, burned by the Nazis as propaganda, it's a lovely simple story that's just as relevant today as when it was written nearly 80 years ago. Still have a copy which I read regularly. As I got a bit older I went on to Enid Blyton, Biggles and Malcolm Savilles 'Lone Pine' books. Haven't stopped reading since!
  5. Thanks Commo, good to know my memory hasn't let me down!
  6. On the subject of cinemas, I seem to remember being taken to somewhere called the 'Odd Hour Cinema' as a child in Nottingham in the 1950s, and watching cartoons and wildlife films. Anyone else remember this or is it my memory playing tricks on me?
  7. We were given some green bags for growing potatoes a couple of years ago. We filled them with bought (peat free) compost, planted seed potatoes and fed and watered them religiously. Lots of luxuriant top growth which got ripped to shreds in the first strong winds. The cost of the seed potatoes and compost exceed the value of the potatoes harvested by about ten to one. They did taste lovely though and the grandchildren had great fun digging them up. However we have great success growing carrots, beetroot, runner beans and even peas in a mixture of soil and compost in large pots. Must make sure
  8. The maggot farm by Rectory Junction signal box at the bottom end of Colwick industrial Estate. One of the most disgusting places I've ever been.
  9. Hi mick360. Lived on Moor Road.Family were miners and had been in the village for decades. Moved away when I was six so don,t have too many memories. Strongest memory is spending hours watching the tubs on the aerial ropeway at Hucknall Top Pit.
  10. Does anyone remember the little sweet shop on the corner of Spring Terrace and Nuthall Road. Happy memories of spending my pennies (or even ha'pennies of farthings) there.
  11. Sorry should have said that I'd always assumed it must be WW1. Thanks for the map.
  12. I attended this school known as the 'Cowsheds' between 1958 and 196, a collection of army type wooden buildings with a more modern prefab classroon and outside toilets.Remember being very cold in winter except in the modern building where the fumes from the coke stove made you sleepy. I think the head teacher was a Mr Mann. I have always believed that the buildings were a former prisoner of war camp but cannot find any evidence to support this. Internet searches reveal nothing. Does anyone out there have any knowledge of the history of these buildings. I would be very grateful to know.
  13. Borrn 1951 Bestwood village, briefly went to school there before moving to Western Boulevard and Whitemoor Junior. Then moved to Nuthall and Temple 'cowsheds' Primary followed by Henry Mellish Grammar until leaving the area in 1966. Live in 'Glorious Devon' now but deep down still think of Nottingham as 'home'. Remember the city as a fantastic place to grow up.