banjo48

Memories of Daybrook and Other things.

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On the same side was Danny`s Tattoo parlour and a couple of other shops whos names escape me

On the far right......

tatt.jpg

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Spot on thanks for that cliff ton

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Hi stu

The Five Mile House you refer to is past the pumping station on Mansfield Road A60 at the turn off for Burnt stump Hill

FCH782C

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I got invited to a shoot at the brewery in Kimberley, there was a range underneath for employees.

It was like long tunnels from memory as I only went a few times as it was a fair run for me living in Carlton.

My forte was really "rough shooting" as it was termed, where we had permissions to shoot vermin, rabbits etc. on farmers properties.

Used to love walking the fields with the dog, some times not even firing a shot ! but just being out there.

Shotgun licence used to be 5 pounds, and a simple form to fill in, that was it.

I still shoot occasionally, but only the odd rabbit for the pot now. No more shotguns though, I have a real rifle now.

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hi all, loved reading this thread. My dad's family lived at 10 Salop Street-my great uncle Bob (gran's brother)had the woodyard half way up. I remember going on Saturdays to see gran & grandad & rest of family, and going to the chippy at the botom of the street. I remember the houses at the bottom of the street fronting Mansfield Road, before they were demolished & R Mould built premises there. We used to catch the bus back home, near to 7 Mile House (NOT 5 mile house!) at the bus stop and an old woman in the cottages would come out & shout at us if I sat on her wall. When I went there (late 50's, 60's) Cerebos Salt was still at bottom of Street. What is now a (notorious!) dentists practice was a GP surgery run by Drs Nicol & Kendrick. Nicol was lovely, but Kendrick was very brusque, as I recall. I used to wait for bus home from Arnold High at White Hart, and the fields were still used as grazing, before houses were built there in the 70's. Mum uses to shop at Mr Holmes shop-she also used the Post Office which was in a terrace of houses between the Ram & Waggon & Horses. We lived near Bottom House Farm (after Lamins' Top House Farm) & mum would walk from there to Arnold pushing a pram with me & bro in it. Bless here, they made 'em tough in them days!!!!

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Welcome to Nottstalgia YoungH. I'm sure you'll find lots of interesting topics here.

A good friend of mine lived in the terrace between the Ram and Waggon & Horses and then moved to Bestwood when those houses were demolished.

A few Nottstalgians went to Arnold High so you may remember them, depending on the years you were there. I grew up in Arnold but went to Carlton-le-Willows

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Welcome to Nottstalgia YoungH. I'm a Gedling Gel, but spent quite a bit of my early teens hanging around with pals in Arnold; so I am always interested in peoples memories of the area. I enjoyed reading your post. :biggrin:

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LizzeM #106: Whilst at Carlton Le Willows did you know a lad called Merville? He lived up Redhill and had a slightly younger brother called Robert. Alas, I can't remember his forename.

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The name doesn't ring an immediate bell Compo so he wasn't in my year. I remember a boy called Melville who was older than me. I'll have a think. Did he live in Daybrook? If so he would have been on the same school bus I should think.

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Wow - just seeing that map of Salop Street brought back a lot of memories - anyone remember the big"bomb hole" behind the Oxo factory? We used to play in the woodyard (Bronno's) and we had the single dwelling house right next to it - we had an orchard out back and my dad kept pigeons and chickens. Widdowson's was the chipshop - the owners lived one up on the street to us. Pat Widdowson was the daughter - a year older than me i think,

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We used to catch the bus back home, near to 7 Mile House (NOT 5 mile house!) at the bus stop and an old woman in the cottages would come out & shout at us if I sat on her wall. When I went there (late 50's, 60's)

Just a note on this. The Seven Mile House (and perhaps nowadays, the Seven Mile restaurant to a degree) are well known local landmarks of course, situated as they are seven miles from both Nottingham and Mansfield. I have however, seen reference to a distinct and different 'Five Mile House' in Notts historical stuff. I have often wondered exactly what this building is/was and have come to the conclusion it was the old Guide House in Redhill (Gadsby's farm) which stood on Mansfield Road, a little further north of the Waggon and Horses and on the same side. That would be (getting on for) five miles from Nottingham.

We've spoken about it on here before but it was a building of great significance. Almost certainly the first licenced inn in the Redhill/Arnold area and along with The Hutt at Ravenshead, reputedly one of only two buildings at all on the main road from Nottingham to Mansfield after around Forest Road, emerging from the city. There is a strong and realistic theory that Nell Gwynne used it for discrete lodgings too. There wouldn't have really been anywhere much else in those parts at that time - apart from Bestwood Lodge which might have been problematic!

The Guide House, Redhill

NCCC002396.jpg

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Redhill ?

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Pennsylvania ....... No it's not a bleddy word game? :crazy:

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On 09/11/2012 at 0:59 PM, Cliff Ton said:

Here's the early 1960s. Morris Street is clearly marked.

(Something I've just noticed which dates it..........Arno Vale road doesn't extend beyond the bottom of Somersby Road. I can remember that being extended. The old GN railway line would still have been in the way - albeit unused)

 

I moved to the new school at the bottom of Somersby Road in September 1961.  The GN line had closed but there were still locos steaming up and down the line and could be watched from my classroom window.  I can only assume they were shunting and/or removing track?

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My sister's wedding reception was a the Waggon & Horses (Photo a few posts back) in around 1974.

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Ex wifes 21st there in 1974............was Bill Whare ex Forest player the landlord there at your reception compo?

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On 11/20/2012 at 1:41 PM, Compo said:

Caddy rings a bell. I have asked the local history group for the name but no reply yet.

I used to live just up the road from Caddy’s foundry on Sherbrooke road. As kids we used to hunt in the piles of scrap to find ball bearings. 

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My maternal grandparents were  from Arnold and Daybrook. My grandmothers family name was Ellis and they owned Ellis bakery on Front Street where my mother was born. The premises are now occupied Birds bakery. My grandfather Charles Clarke was the youngest of 5 children. His father was a van driver, (horse drawn) for Jacobees, dyers and finishers in Daybrooke. He was very good with horses and eventually became head of the stables and lived in a firms house alongside the stables which I think was on Sherbrooke Road. 
My grandfather started work in the lace market where he had to keep the coal fires in the offices going, running up and down with a coal bucket. He went to night school and qualified as an accountant and worked most of his life at Armitages pet foods at Colwick catching the train there from Arnold. He lived to a ripe old age and would walk from his home in Arnold to my mums in Lenton when he was in his 80’s. He’d stay at my mothers at Christmas in his latter years as he never owned a tv and liked to watch the Queens speach.  One time when I had a cassette recorder as a present so I taped him talking about his childhood and experiences in WW1. I still have the tape. He had a distinct Daybrooke accent. My grandmother was a grumpy old so and so. My grandfather more tolerant of grubby little boys like me and was very pleasant.

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4 hours ago, letsavagoo said:

 He had a distinct Daybrook accent. 

 

I've never heard of that before. What is it, and how does it differ from other areas ?

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1 hour ago, Cliff Ton said:

 

I've never heard of that before. What is it, and how does it differ from other areas ?

Hard to describe but Daybrooke was pronounced Day Bruke. I’ve got the tape I made on a cd now. You can have a copy if you want. I did donate some copies to the local studies library in town but I bet they couldn’t find them now.

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5 hours ago, Jill Sparrow said:

My maternal grandfather and his family lived in Sherbrooke Road in 1891. The house is no longer in existence.

Very probable they knew each other Jill. They were in the area at the same time. Many years later my grandfathers sister Jessie went to live with one of his other sisters, Edith on Sherbrooke Road, a little was up on the right, from Mansfield Road. I often went to see Aunty Jessie and Edith when I was young. You had to sit in total silence while Coronation Street came on. I have a picture of the house somewhere. Not sure if it’s still there. I look up Sherbrooke Road when I drive up Mansfield Road and there are some of the older houses so maybe it is.

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1 hour ago, letsavagoo said:

 I’ve got the tape I made on a cd now. You can have a copy if you want. I did donate some copies to the local studies library in town but I bet they couldn’t find them now.

 

I'll decline the offer, thanks. I'd probably listen to it once and then file it away forever.

 

6 hours ago, Jill Sparrow said:

My maternal grandfather and his family lived in Sherbrooke Road in 1891. The house is no longer in existence.

 

This is Sherbrook in the 1920s, showing houses which no longer exist.

jTcT2CV.jpg

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