Compo

'Serry'

Recommended Posts

Where are you based now Scriv? Have family in Llanidloes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carmarthen mate; been here nine years. Lived in Narberth, Pembs for a few months in the early 1990's whilst working for Nightfreight; that gave me the taste for the area and I came down here for good after I sold me Dad's place in 2003.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When our place gets too much for us we intend to move south; possibly Pembroke or Builth. Not for some time yet though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anybody remember the phrase used by many corpo bus conductors in the 50s and 60s to the standing bus passengers as the bus pulled away fron the stop/terminus

OJA TITES

Roughly translated to hold on tight

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'serry' was definately used in Hucknall , although not so much now so im thinking its from the pits

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Serry" was a common form of greeting among my football mates of the '60s, '70s. I remember one lad turned up for one match with a newly styled Beatles cut. He got the usual "Ay-Up Serry" So I told him he was the Serry with the fringe on top.

Always assumed Serry was slang for mate or similar. A regards the word sorry (as in aplogising) a replacement for that when playing football was "Sos." You'd foul someone and say "Sos, mate." Course you could have also said, "Sos, Serry." But not if you had a lisp.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Scriv is probably right it is from sirrah used in Elizabethen times. It isn't a million miles away from the American English sirree, heard more in the southern states. Probably from the old French seigneur - a noble/gentleman which also can be linked to senior (older). Which goes back to latin ,senere to be old. Probably back to the mists of time.

What is sad is that the regional variations that you could hear frequently 50 yrs ago are much rarer nowadays. Will there be any variations in another 50yrs?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps somebody in Nottingham could approach the Nottingham Evening Post and get a reporter with a tape machine of some sorts to interview older people to get the dialects down for posterity. They are dying. My dad died in January last year aged 92 and he used words that I didn't and I use words my son doesn't, especially as he now lives in Edinburgh!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where are you based now Scriv? Have family in Llanidloes.

Small world. I once did a horse carriage driving course in Llanidloes. Stayed at a hotel called Lloyds just up from the old town hall. Possibly the friendliest hotel I have ever stayed at.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Serry, being a derivative of "sirrah" as told by my father, comes to notts vie the yorkshire pits especially those close to Barnsley.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Serry was a term used in the Soddam area of Radford in the 1960s. (Soddam being that bit around Canterbury Road.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Phoenix

Hope it's OK to throw in my two pennerth! I'm new here and I'm finding some of the threads absolutely fascinating and so many reawakened memories. What an incredible site.

I'm not not Nottingham born and bred. I moved there in 1961 as an 11 yr old and the first thing that struck me was the way people spoke. I was born near Liverpool so was unfamiliar with other regional accents and words. The first strange word I remember was 'sucker'. Used for ' lolly ice'. I'd only heard them called ice lolly, so another difference. But I remember hearing 'serray' and eventually realising it meant friend or mate.

It must be over 40 years since I've thought about it...but serendipity is a strange thing. I'm reading a book called Rustication by Charles Palliser. 'Sirrah' is used by one male to another and it wasn't a term I'd heard. I looked it up and it goes back to 16th century. Used as a greeting by males often where one is 'lower class' than the other. Class issues aside, that seems neat. I had student friends from the North East in the early 70s who used it as a term of fond greeting. Seems to be specifically male usage.

I'm loving this forum! Loads of random with context.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Belper you hear ,im looking for sheep thou knows, they have an interest in Rams arounnd here, dunna know why.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Think some people go to Australia, possibly for the same reasons,im sure i heard a couple of them bleating on another topic Apparently our taxes paid for their flight,just shows the government dont always waste our money

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitly the Derbyshire, Erewash, Mansfield, Worksop areas.

As most here know I live in W Australia and earlier this year met a couple next to us in a caravan park and he heard me and the wife talking, asked where we were from originally and what a small world, he was from Mansfiled way but had married a Woodthorpe girl and came to oz about 30 odd years ago ! he slipped into Yowth and serrie and a whole lot more ! we had quite a a few happy hours reminising the old Nottm days.

He was going on about missing silly things like potted meat, and Shippams crab paste and heaps more. Said he had bought a case of crab paste and still had a couple of jars left he was saving for a special day !

When I was back there in the uk last year I found some potted meat in Tesco's or maybe Morrisons, but we used to buy it loose from a big bowl from Pork Farms I think, their Salmon paste was also a favourite pack up lunch for me too.

He was also on about Haslet and Black pudding ! Nothing like that here in W Australia.

Grew up in Mansfield Woodhouse where pronunciation was more towards "sorry." So the common greeting was "Ayup, sorry." English teacher at school claimed it was corruption of the archaic "sirrah."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I heard it used in the 60's along with faitin and Scraitin ( fighting and crying I believe ) correct me if I'm wrong and that was Ilkeston / Eastwood area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got called something I haven't heard for years the other day. 'Marrer'. I was told it is a Bulwell/Hucknall word meaning the same sort of thing as Serry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haven't heard "marrer" for years either - but I always thought it was a Staffordshire expression, notably around Stoke-on-Trent where I went to college.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just looked the word 'marrer' up and found that it means a friend or mate. The only time that I've heard it before is if you say "Wots a marrer" meaning 'What's a matter'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...