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The old rhyming slang must be taking a battering.....what rhymes with Ukrainian,Latvian,Iraqi,Somalian and Romanian?

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There must be a few Ukrainian,Latvian,Iraqi,Somalian and Romanian Cockneys born within the sound of the bow bells?

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That would make them British cockneys then, and not Ukrainian,Latvian,Iraqi,Somalian and Romanian................................ slywink

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As a result of a 'Reported Post'

and members comment.. "I for one do not think this is the right place for this post, it does not show the writer in a good light"

I have removed two replies from this thread.

and edited comments from one other.

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Did you know that Nottingham was a divided town ? Divided between the Normans and the Anglo Saxons .

This according to Mrs A Gilbert in her lecture Old Nottingham http://freepages.family.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~taylorsofongar/nottingham.html

William the Norman knew better how to settle the kingdom politically than socially, ........... he could not extinguish the burning hate of the English — as the Anglo-Saxons had begun to be called — ­against their rivals in possession.

So fierce were the quarrels that it was found necessary to divide the town into two boroughs — east and west — with separate jurisdictions, separate tribunals, separate churches.

A wall was constructed from near Robin Hood's Yard along a bit of Milton Street, Clumber Street, High Street, Bridlesmith Gate, Drury Hill, Sussex Street, to Leen Side, the southern boundary of the town.

All to the east of this wall was English; it included the Old Town Hall, then called Mont Hall, Weekday Cross, St. Mary's Church, and the important Leen Bridge at the foot of Malin Hill.

To the west of the , the borough was Norman, except one-half of the Market Place.

To further accentuate the differences between the two races who could not meet on market days without strife, a wall ran east and west from the Exchange to the Malt Cross; the space to the north fronting Long Row was assigned to the English; that looking towards South Parade, to the Normans, who thus possessed that part of the borough west and south-west.

Their Guildhall was the Old Moot Hall at the bottom of Friar Lane; their churches those of St. Peter and St. Nicholas; and their bridge over the Leen, the one at the foot of Castle Road.

Rivers and bridges have long gone the way of all things. Lenton Boulevard covers over the channel and its reedy banks as they were in my time, when a walk by Leenside and across the Park, then innocent of houses, was an enjoyable ramble.

The distinction between the two boroughs as evinced by the two walls remained until 1724; on any old map may be seen the Market Place division.

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French was spoken by the 'Norman descendants'up to the early 17th century.

When Charles the 1st raised his 'battle flag' in Nottingham, at the outbreak of the civil war, the city was split into two factions,one for Charlie, the other for Parliament.

As was the case in many areas of the midlands.the common folk were in fear of an invasion by a'Catholic' army from France or Ireland. This was the reason Charles was charged with "Treason against the English people".

We all know how that one finished.

You can be sure very little French was heard in public, around Nottingham after 1650.By 1700 many of the separating walls had the stones removed as building or paving material.

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Did you know! just found out to my surprise that a race horse track used to be on the Forest with an impressive club house for the gentry smack in the middle, lords and royalty have visited.one of the best courses in England. then moved to Colwick.

also did you know that Gregory Boulevard was named after Mrs Gregory who owned the land known as Forest fields, Also did you know Forest football club got there name from the forest as it was their ground until they moved over the Trent, and the Forest got its name from being the southern part of Sherwood Forest. and there used to be 13 or 14 Windmills at the top end.

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In answer to most of that.... YUP !!

Didn't know the bit about Mrs Gregory, any relation to the owners of Gregory's Rose Gardens ?

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13 windmills...and the original race track went all the way to Alfreton Road when first built...and the Forest was known as 'The Lings' which meant heather and gorse sandy wasteland and previous to that it was known as Whiston Wong...Whiston being a lost hamlet that was roughly where the church is now at Forest Road..The Mrs Gregory bit might allude to George de linge Gregory who was Lord of the Manor in the Radford area.

And did you know that in mid Victorian days Woodborough Road from Nottingham only reached as far as the base of the hill,the remaining route to Mapperley hills was just a footpath until it reached Mapperley Road.Waggons wanting to go to the brickyards on Mapperley top had to travel along the Mansfield Road where they turned up what is now Redcliffe Road where it was known as Tod Hill...(Tod meant Fox in those days) .Redcliffe Road was more or less impassable in winter and the brickyard owners used to store thousands of bricks in the Carrington area in the better weather to avoid the problem.

And did you know that tens of millions of bricks were made in Mapperley including all those that were used to make St.Pancras Station.

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Did you know that when the windmills were on what is now forest road  one of the mill owners who was a notorious drunkard set off on horseback to sell his old nag at Mansfield market  This he duly achieved and retired to the pub  After several hours drinking he came out worse for wear to buy another horse for his return journey  On his arrival home he was amazed when the horse trotted off round to the stable on its own  The next day when he sobered up he realised that he had not only brought his own horse back but had paid more for it than he had sold it for ha ha  The description of him coming up what is now Mansfield road was that it was amazing how he stayed in the saddle as he was rolling like a ship in a storm  meeowed

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