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Cliff Ton

Before Netherfield......

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Unless it was known by another name , there are only a couple of mentions in the news archives of a Gedling workhouse and both are about coach accidents happening near it , so I would have thought it was on the main road . One below from 1844 in the Stamford Mercury . Ten years later in 1854 it was being described as the "old workhouse" and was used as a place for auctions .

12060444333_c0a65d17d3.jpg

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Post 14 brought back some more memories, firstly one of my favorite fishing spots, and in later life I used to scuba dive around the old ferry route and had a few nice little finds along the river bed.

Mainly very old ginger beer bottles and few cod bottles (the one's with the glass ball inside).

One summers evening a few friends and I were again looking for artifacts when we found a jag that had been dumped from the Stoke side, quite scary for me as I swam along the up current side of the car I found the window open and reached in and thought I had found a dead body ! It was full of silt and felt just as one would imagine a body just like jelly.

Visibility in those days was virtually nil in the Trent ! so one went by feel more than sight.

We rang the police and they recovered it next day, it had been stolen and used for joy riding then dumped ! Had some photo's once but not a clue where they would now be.

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am i right in saying tht near the bottom left hand side of this map it says royal oak carnt make out last word and above that it looks like ouse bridge as was talked about in another thread recently.

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So I assume that the Ouse Bridge crossed the 'river Ouse' ......... it was just a narrow stream (dyke) running alongside the cricket field when I lived in Netherfield, in fact it ran across the bottom of our garden and as a little tot I could jump over it.

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I have some vague memory of hearing that the 'Inn for a Penny' pub on Burton Road was once called the "Royal Oak". Location seems right.

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Hi DavidA'

Yes, I can vouch for that, I had my Wedding Reception in the upstairs room when it was "The Royal Oak" and that was 1966. Sorry I can't say when the name changed to "Inn for a Penny.

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went to quite a few wedding receptions thereit was one of the biggest private function rooms in the area

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ouse bride was only a small bridge lizzie it changed then disapeared compleatly whith all the new rd layouts when the loop rd went in as for the ouse dyke as we all called it had many a booty trying to jump it at various points up the dyke unlike you i anly had little leggs still do and i could never quite make it hence one or two very wet muddy feet.and that was if i managed not to fall backwards and land on me bum not too bad on a hot day but if it was cold staight home to get dry and change cloths end of play for that day get the tin bath out to get cleaninto clean cloths but i had to stay in to cet my shoes clean and dry thats why i enjoyed plastic sandals when they were all the rage as i had 3 or 4 pairs of them couse they were quite cheap and you just had to wash them and dry with a cloth and lots of different colours

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       Cliff Ton:- what date is your map at the start of this thread?

       It's showing two farms and another building closer to where the Midland Railway would be built.

       If that is Brierley's cottage, then your map is locating it on what would later be Garnett Street, not where I've always thought it to be: junction of Meadow/Victoria Roads. 

       The 1841 census lists Brierley's cottage in Netherfield but not the farms. Looking at their locations it's feasible one would be on Colwicks census return and the other on Stoke Bardolphs return.

       It does look from your map that the southern section comes under Colwick Parish.

        The farm on the 1851 census Low Field Farm doesn't appear to have been built. Assuming this farm changed its name to Carlton Fields at some later date, before being eliminated by the railway sometime around late 1880's, as the signal box in the middle of the sidings took its name from this house. Unless Low Field Farm has switched districts for the later census?

     

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13 hours ago, Dark Angel said:

       Cliff Ton:- what date is your map at the start of this thread? 

 

It's from Sanderson's '20 miles around Mansfield' published in 1835.....so obviously surveyed a few years before then.

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   Thanks Cliff Ton, a fair bit on this map to get my teeth into!

   Having sorted out the farms in my head, I now have an issue over the location of the first house built in Netherfield!

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