tombarber

Barber Walker & Co and Major Barber

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Its whereabouts might explain why I had heard of it. My Grandmother must have spoke of it as she originated from Hyson Green. She was born on Belton Street further down Radford Road. It was probably her  Dads favourite pub! I dare bet the locals referred to it just as 'Lumley'.

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Hi all. More info on the photos:

#96 - top is my great aunt Naomi, of Manse fame, on the moor at Dunmaglass, our old place in Scotland. 1950s?

 

Second down is the front door of the lodge at Dunmaglass. Not sure who boy on left is but next is my grandmother Diana, then my aunt Mary, my great grandmother Beatrice and finally my great grandfather Phillip (Major) Barber, always with left hand in pocket as he'd lost half of it in the Great War. 1950s?

 

#98

Top three

My great aunt Naomi x2 and in 3rd with her mum my g-grandfather  Beatrice. Next four I don't know and last is as above with added g-grandfather Philip Barber. These are from negatives that must have been printed wrong way around as Phillips wrong hand in pocket! Late 1950s or 1960-1.

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#128

 

Thanks Tom.

 

The original slides were marked Dunmaglass.

 

The colour slides gave no indication of which way round they should be viewed, as they were in plain cardboard mounts. The box was marked 'Lamb Close and Hilda' if that means anything to you?

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Hi Jill - intrigued because I've no idea who Hilda is! Maybe she's the lady in the other 4 photos? Sorry if I missed it earlier in the feed but how did you come to end up with them?

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#130

 

The slides and other photos belonged to Caroline Isabella Fryar, the daughter of Mark Fryar and Louisa Mary Strelley. There have been marriages between the Barber and Strelley families centuries ago, I believe.

 

Caroline was a cousin of Ruth Barber, later Haslam. The Haslams were also coalmasters in Derbyshire.

 

Ruth Barber was the grandmother of Richard who rescued Caroline's photographs and papers at her death, as the auctioneers had bagged them up be destroyed, having removed all her antique furniture for future sale. In my humble opinion, they should have been shot!

 

Caroline was a friend of Naomi Barber and, I would guess, visited Lamb Close quite regularly. She was also a former SOE operative during WW2, having been a nurse during WW1, and knew how to keep her secrets. A fascinating lady. Sadly, I never met her but have spent many years researching her life.

 

She was known to her family and friends as Molly.

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I've communicated with Tom Barber, but I thought I'd drop this in for all of you. I was given as a gift 41 glass plates negatives by a friend who is an interior designer. He had purchased a chest here in the USA which came from England. In the chest was a small wooden box which contained these negatives. I've researched the images on and off for years and I have found most of the depicted locations; a few from Italy, travel, a few of tennis being played at Lamb Close (presumably by the members of the Barber family), Liverpool Cathedral, St. Mary The Virgin, Church of England, Ripon, etc. I wish I had more time to devote to the research. Dr. John Worthen, Professor Emeritus from The University of Nottingham, helped me with some locations. Very generous of him. He is a D. H.Lawrence scholar and the Lamb Close house figures in several of Lawrence's writings. I would post an image but the size requirements are so stringent that it wouldn't be useful. If we can find a forum which supports bigger files I can share the scanned images.

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1 hour ago, chaynes said:

 I would post an image but the size requirements are so stringent that it wouldn't be useful. If we can find a forum which supports bigger files I can share the scanned images.

 

Are you referring to the 0.05mb limit which is mentioned in the reply boxes ?    If so, ignore that, it's stupidly pointless and no-one uses it. All the photos on here have been posted using Photobucket or Flickr or something similar. That should get round the problems of file size.

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Thank you Cliff. This is probably a better way for me. Exciting to be able to share these with someone who has some interest in what I'm talking about. There is reference to other images that have been shared. Is there some way I can get access to those? Have nice day.

 

http://haynes-photographs.com/nottinghamshire-images-barber-family-english-architecture-italy/

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That's a great collection of photos. Some of them I definitely recognise as being connected with the Barber story, but as indicated in the album, some of the others could be anywhere in the world. Have I missed something, or is there any way of finding details of the various subjects and locations ?

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I have identified a gate in Stresa, Italy, 2 scenes from Venice,  one of the Borromeo Islands in Lago Maggiore, a couple of images of the Fountains Abbey ruins in England, Liverpool Cathedral, Ripon Cathedral, North Yorkshire, St. Mary The Virgin, Church of England Norman Church. Ascot (not royalty... horses aren't white and the carriage is different). Lamb Close house and environs. Lamb Close servants, I'm guessing. Barber family playing tennis. I'm worried about the little blond girl in the grouping on the steps because I don't know the time frame and I know one of the girls met with an accident. Number 30 shows the bell ropes in what I think might be Iffley Chapel. Brings to mind "The Nine Tailors" by Dorothy Sayers. I found ID in Ripon for the exact choir stall carving from Ripon... The whole thing has been a 30 year odyssey. I haven't been able to work on the images as much as I might like. I have the time now and I'd like to recreate as many of the images as I can. I have photographed from the exact spot of one of the Venice photographs. I don't have the exact spots for Lago Maggiore and the Borromeo Islands but the ID of those came from photographs I had made on travels there. For me it has been fascinating to see what someone photographed in that time period. I'm also curious how they came to be in Atlanta, Georgia.

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Hi Tom Barber......the distant sound you hear is Honor revolving  ! Hope you are well....Brenda x

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Tom, the original of the portrait from Honor`s of her father is I understand in the Nottm Council Offices on a staircase but I have not seen it........she had the smaller one done as a memorial. The portrait of the small girl with the bow in her hair which was in the wardrobe is of Naomi aged 4,  I believe .

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In or around 1961 I remember the property known as Newthorpe Grange coming to the market, and along with my mother and much older brother, viewing the house with the agent. Subsequently, I again attended a second viewing with my father and mother.

Such large properties, with high upkeep costs, were not really in vogue at the time, many buyers being more likely to seek compact modern homes.

At the time of the initial viewings the property was generally in good condition with panelling and original features in abundance, and I recall the music room, the library, with a mass of fitted bookshelves, and what particularly interested me as an eleven year old keen shooter, the gun room with its many racks for rifles and shotguns and cabinets for handguns and ammunition.

The kitchen and bathroom fittings were of another era, and even the wash basins were three or four times the volume of todays equipment. The baths were immense and must have taken an age to fill.

Not surprisingly the heating system was coal fired and the boiler room  to the rear of the property not only heated the house but also the very large greenhouses located in the ample grounds.

Despite the written warning that planning consent would not become available for the land ( it just goes to show that you should not believe all that is written or spoken for that matter) the £5,000, or thereabouts asking price was fair if you had viable plans for the premises.

Our offer was left on the table, however, still unsold some three months later when I returned with my brother, despite having no agent with us we were able to enter the property. This was through one of the tall broken windows to the front of the house where we discovered that what could not be stolen had been smashed. A shameful end to a fine house.

Somewhere I believe I still have the paperwork for the sale but where is the question. 

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We moved onto the adjacent estate in 1959. (I wasn't quite 3).  I don't remember it being anything other than derelict.

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I was intrigued by your post, Centaur, but saddened by its ending. As you will know if you have read previous posts, I inherited a large amount of documents and photographs connected with the Fryar family. John William Fryar was a former manager of the Barber Walker Colliery and resident of the house you speak of.

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I knew Sir William Barber very well,we used to service his car which was 1956 Bentley Continental he also had a ex army Commer which he would drive up Scotland to drive around his estate.My father had the garage at Watnall about 2 miles away from Moorgreen.Sir Bill was very generous at Christmases calling in at the garage and leaving a large amount of cash as a Chrisrmas gift for everyone to share.l believe his wife was an alchohlic and did not see much of her,l knew Bills chauffeur and gardener very well his name was Harry Cook he would bring the Bentley to the garage for servicing when he got out of the car in his scruffy gardening clothes he would get strange looks from other customers at the garage,if anyone has pictures or information on the Barbers or the Manse i would be interested to read about it,as l emigrated to Canada .

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I can recall my Dad coming back from our shop in Eastwood with some very fine clocks which belonged to Major Barber. The only clock I can remember was an alabaster and gilt French Boudoir Clock which finished up with my mother in her bedroom which looked very grand amongst some rather simple furniture ( I hope my Dad bought it!)

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Was this the Barber family that owned Moorgreen pit?

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It was indeed. I used to know the manager of Moorgreen colliery back in the 70’s, David Weir. He was a flying instructor at Tollerton. Many of us had a visit underground.

 

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