carni

Scon or Scone?

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Hi, I apologise if this topic has been covered before,

We had a lovely day visiting Ashbourne yesterday,and saved ourselves for the journey back for our tea, You get a delicious cup of tea every time in Marks & Spencers restaurant and Scone and Jam and clotted cream (and we have butter as well, might as well indulge to the limit). At the counter i ordered 2 scones and teas, the young lady answered me saying 2 scons, i didn't catch it and she said 2 scons again, so i said yes please 2 scones and 2 teas, at which she repeated 2 scons, Not knowing for sure, which it is.

Scons or Scones

I gave her the benefit of the doubt, all my life i have said scones, now i'm not sure? :unsure: So what do you think, and how does it stand with words like...Phone, Bone,Rope etc

Ps, Is it like Haslet and Hazelet, just a regional thing.

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Both are correct, just one of those quirks of evolving English, like either or either....(EETHER)

It's interesting reading how English has and still is evolving, over here, stateside, there are still some remnants of old English still used in everyday speaking, like "I dove into the water" or "He pled guilty", both words go back over two hundred years.

Even the spelling or words has altered from the early 1900's to the mid 1900's, cole or coles comes to mind for coal, coals is not used for the plural, other than "hauled over the coals" that I'm aware of.

In my research of the UK coal industry, I've seen many words that have altered in spelling in the last 100 plus years, some text is hard to read and has to be deciphered to make sense because of the spellings and pronunciation today.

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I should also mention, I use Scon, if memory is right, it's also Scon down under.

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I'm a scone person! Since the correct spelling is with an "e" on the end, it seems to me the appropriate pronunciation makes the "e" audible!

The OED has both pronunciations!

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I'm a scone person, as Limey states, the "e" on the end gives the clue as to how the previous "o" should be pronounced.

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Midlanders tend to pronounce as written unlike those Southern poofs...We don't have a Far Brigade or a Carstle and we never had Thruppeny bits or took a Barth.

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OK, just to confuse matters.......... DONE, should it be "dun" or "douwn" LOL

Both versions of Scone are correct, fashion will in the end dictate which version prevails.

There are many quirky spellings, a lot came about by "fashion" in the 14th, 15, 16th, 17th and 18th centuries

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Well i think i'l stick to scones miducks, what ever you decide to call them, just try one in Marks and Spencers next time you'r in the City, and i am sorry Cornwall but i never found one as nice down there, while on holiday...... Except in M&S at Truro. Fabulous cup of tea as well.

Denshaw, you are right there :blush:

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Well it's stone, not ston, and throne not thron, and I say scone not scon (like the husband!!!), but then again up here and to the east the place is pronounced scoon!!!! slywink

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NEVER try and make sense of the English language, you'll always fall flat on your face.....LOL

Historically, fashion dictates how words are both pronounce and spelt or Spelled, depends where you live for a start......

Also before I get pulled up, spelled is correct, it's the way the English spelt the word less than two hundred years back before fashion dictated spelt...

So you can't blame Americans for misspelling words, many of the word used stateside are the original English spellings.

A good book on the subject, well worth reading...

The Mother Tongue.......English & How It Got That Way.....By Bill Bryson an American Journalist who works for a London newspaper.

It's easy and interesting reading, and it's an eyeopener.

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It's scon in Norfolk and pikelets are crumpets, though whether there's any strict difference between these I've no idea. It's a bit like Mark Twain's remark about the Italians. They pronounce far better than they spell.

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Being from the common parts of Nottingham I would say scone. But there are other words. My granddad used to say bon instead of burn.

Talking of the way they talk in the south, they say things like parth and grarss and parss but still pronounce the word (as in the animal) ass the same as us. I wonder why.

Anyway, what does it matter how one (oh I say) pronounces scone or scon as long as long as you get more than one (or should it be wone).

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Scone/scon they both taste the same with jam on who care's what they are called, yum yum

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Iv allways called them scones, allways better home made with cherries inside & a dollop of cream ontop!

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Well it's stone, not ston, and throne not thron, and I say scone not scon (like the husband!!!), but then again up here and to the east the place is pronounced scoon!!!! slywink

In broad Lincolnshire it's ston! But they say scone...

As someone else said, I've always thought scon was the posh way of saying it.

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Is it Derby or Darby,

As the Imp said, with some dialects, stone is ston and throne is thron.

The same as some say filum instead of film.

If you get a ston bounce of your scon, you wouldn't care how it's said as long as the pain stopped! But a Scot would say the Stone of Scone!

Is it garage or garridge?

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Well, it's obviously garridge init - gar-age. My age is 64 (not my "arje") - but for goodness sake don't rely on Lincolnshire for pronunciation. We lived there for 15 years and learnt a different language - what with Ozzonby (Osbournby) and Azleby (Aslackby) and Kirby Laythorpe (Kirkby la Thorpe). My son started school there, and came home after a few weeks with a rhyme that was pronounced like this "One sticky ban in a biker's shop - big and round with a cherry on top; Tommy came along with penny to pie - he pied one penny and took the ban a-why." He was quite upset when we laughed.

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You have explained it in a nutshell.....it is the local dialects of England that provide our different versions of words.

By the way, you do not look 64 years of idge.

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You are right about dialects. I lived in Glasgow for five years and it was 6 months before I could understand what anyone was on about.

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