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before jet travel and even afore we all had cars do you recall the day trips to exotic places like Belle vue,dudley zoo,skeg,cleethorpes,away matches to see notts or forest,wickstead park,and the old buses.sometimes organised by a pub or just someone down your street.my uncles used to be members of the Old angel pub fishing club and often took me with em days i will never forget

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Reading benjamin1945's post (#1), it reminded me of a post I put on a couple of years ago regarding days out. We were always out during the summer months. As a kid living in the Meadows almost everyo

Let’s get this ‘Day Trip’ topic back on track as I’m old enough to remember when half the back page of the E.Post listed all the different rail trips available that weekend. (full page at Bank holiday

Standard Of England pub, Park Lane,Basford,     Three generations of David's family in the old 2nd left is David's great grandmother Hannah Oldham, 3rd left David's grandmother Mary Lane (always

My granddad was a member of the Labour Party at Radford and they used to have loads of coach outings to places like Skegness and Blackpool. I remember one going to Lady Bower Dam and it rained all day (how unusual LOL). We used to go on Skills day trips by coach from their little bus pad at the bottom of Derby Road.

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before jet travel and even afore we all had cars do you recall the day trips to exotic places like Belle vue,dudley zoo,skeg,cleethorpes,away matches to see notts or forest,wickstead park,and the old buses.sometimes organised by a pub or just someone down your street.my uncles used to be members of the Old angel pub fishing club and often took me with em days i will never forget

I recall a day trip to Belle Vue Zoo, I think it was an Easter Monday, a Class 5 steam hauled excursion from Nottingham Midland, probably about 1960. We routed along the Radford-Trowell line past my house, I recall seeing my mates standing on the old level crossing gates that led to the old brickworks site near the canal off Coventry Lane, I waved and shouted out the leather strapped pull down window, but they never heard me. We took what is now the Midland Railway Museum route through Butterley and hence via the eastern spur of Ambergate triangular station to join the Derby- Manchester line. I recall hanging out the pull down window as we went up the Monsall Valley route, it was magnificent. Belle Vue Station was in a deep cutting, I remember us being ushered up the station ramps towards the zoo, it was the first zoo I'd ever been to. Quite frankly, I didn't like it, the poor star of the event, the hippo, was languishing in a tiny circular pool of filthy green water, constantly opening it's cavernous mouth for tit-bits, I've never been a fan of zoo's ever since and that one in particular seemed firmly based in the 19th century.

For kids of my age and social position, day excursions were a cheap route for escapism, I can recount the numerous adventures we had during those times, if anyone is interested, the Blackpool Illuminations/Forest Away Game excursion circa 1961 from Vic was a quite incredible journey, did anyone else go on that.

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Ayup Pete. Can you remember going by coach to Villa Park to watch a 2nd replay in a cup match Forest V Swindon around 1967. I'm sure it was arranged by one of the teachers at school.

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Ayup Pete. Can you remember going by coach to Villa Park to watch a 2nd replay in a cup match Forest V Swindon around 1967. I'm sure it was arranged by one of the teachers at school.

It was indeed, but I can't recall which one, I also think that there was a certain amount of pupil involvement with the organisation as well, though not by us.

The coach ( Camms I think ) ran into the traffic jam just past Ashby, no lovely A38 dual carriageway then. We crawled into Birmingham and the coach driver gave up going any further as the police were stopping traffic from Nottingham claiming that the ground was full. The driver parked up and suggested that he was quite happy to hang about if anyone fancied their chances of getting in ( bless him ). The others elected to listen to it on the coach radio while you and I headed for the ground, I don't recall anyone else attempting this. We walked miles along a dual carriageway and got to Villa Park at half time, to our astonishment the gates were open so we tried to get in, no chance, it was packed solid ( I heard later that the normal 75,000 capacity had exceeded well over 100,000 ). Eventually, going round into the admin block, we got into the restaurant under the double decker stand and managed to climb over the tables to the front, standing behind the BBC cameras on a table, with heads bowed under the edge of the top stand in order to see. We saw all the goals during the second half, was it Joe Baker, John Barnwell and Barry Lyons in that order?

At the final whistle we legged it back to the coach at high speed, not knowing whether it would still be there, it was, we were lucky, probably because of your ability for the outrageous chat the coach driver remembered us and waited!!

I seem to recall us getting home in time to see the replay on BBC TV highlights, though that may have been the next day on Midlands Today or whatever we were spoon fed on TV in those days.

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They were the days Pete. I can remember the teacher who organized it but can't remember his name. Did we stop at a pub on the way back for toilets? That would have been fatal with our lot.

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Reading benjamin1945's post (#1), it reminded me of a post I put on a couple of years ago regarding days out. We were always out during the summer months.

As a kid living in the Meadows almost everyone went to the East coast for a holiday. Thats probably because it was the nearest place to the seaside. Mostly we stayed in caravans but sometimes it was in boarding houses. I remember once, in 1958, stopping at a place called Trusthorpe Hall that had a swimming pool. I've a couple of photos on my computer of my family at the pool. Living in a street with an outside toilet and no bathroom it was just a thrill to go to these places and spend the first few hours 'exploring' the place. When your Mum and Dad took you for your first visit to the beach how thrilled and excited you were as you looked out at the vastness of the sea and wishing your parents would hurry up as they struggled behind you with all the gear. As you got onto the beach and rolled around in the sand you had the manic urge to race down to the sea, as would a new born turtle. All you could hear as you ran to the water was your Mum shouting out for you to be careful. Many years later as a foster parent I'd call out the same thing and always I'd think of my Mum. I've mentioned before how I bought a minibus and would fill it with mine and other foster kids and go to Mablethorpe etc for days out. I'd hire a beach chalet for the day so that we could cook the grub and have a cuppa. The kids played on the beach and in the sea as my wife got the food ready and I'd be keeping an eye on the kids. I'd look out at the sea, as I did as a kid, and let the thousands of thoughts run through my head. There's something about the sea that lets your hopes and dreams manifest in your mind. All the way to Mablethorpe and all the way back home the kids would be singing their heads off. I never intended my post to be so long but you cannot hold back the memories as they come flooding back. My three children are all grown up and have done well for themselves but I often wonder what sort of lives those young foster kids went on to have.

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in my young teenage years on the old Bestwood est a lady called Elsie wyres organised day trips to the east coast mostly Cleethorpes,for teenagers,i have great memories of these.sadly there doesnt seem to be any old Bestwood folk on nottstalgia.thought i would mention a few of the surnames of lads and lasses who went on these trips to see if they resonate with anyone,Warsops,Fishers,Wakefields,Fewkes,Scriven,Olpins,Eastaps,Lowe,Ingall,Ingles,Crowles,Spencer,Peggs,Wallhead,

HELLO,ANY OF YOU OUT THERE?

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DID SHE HAVE A BROTHER,ALAN?

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remember going on sunday school trips to wickstead park loved that place lots of swings rouderbouts seesaws loveley high slides and the like all for freeand plenty of grassy areas to play ball games our trip always inclouded lunch when we got there fish and chips squash for the kids tea or coffee for the grown ups and bread and butter and jelly and icecream for afters. upstaires resturant were you could see luts of the park the only things you had to pay for were the tater cute near the cafe and a little minature railway were we used to go a long way round the park and you used to wave and shout to your friends as you were passing,mum and sometimes dad would go with us so we got to go on the water chute and train before we went home but not till we had run around and played for a good long timenso we wernt sick on the chute or on the bus going home.

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AH, WICKSTEAD PARK,ABOUT 1950 NEARLY DROWNED THERE IN THE BOATING LAKE,WE HAD GONE ON A DAY TRIP WITH A PUB IN OLD BASFORD (OLD ENGLISH GENTLEMEN)FELL OUT OF ROWING BOAT.CHAP PULLED ME OUT WITH A LONG POLE WITH HOOK ON.
THEY PUT ME IN A ROOM CALLED THE DRYING ROOM.LATER THAT DAY A ANOTHER OF OUR PARTY ALSO FELL IN,A GIRL CALLED "LILLY"
WHO WAS FOREEVER KNOWN AS "LILLY OF THE LAKE" :biggrin:

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  • 2 years later...

I wonder if there is anyone who can remember a man called Arthur Shepard who lived in forest fields in the fifties  He worked for the council  His wife was Bessie and a daughter called Christine  What a hero he would organise bus trips all over England  The bus would pick you up at the top of the street it would be the same people who went even the same driver a man called bill Brumby this man did it all off his own back and was the life and soul of the community  As a child it was wonderful to go everywhere from Blackpool to the south coast  They would chalk numbers on the bus wheel and when the bus stopped the winning number would pay out  I met Dennis Spray of Sprays mini bus company on the trips as a child  These unsung heroes were the life blood of the community  meeowed

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Any one on here with a mining heritage that went on their local "pit trip" which took almost the entire village to usually Skeg, Mablethorpe or occasionally Cleethorpes. Up at the crack of dawn, walk to the pit yard where the steam train had been marshalled or a bus to the local railway station and then off on the train to the seaside. Had vouchers for chips and pop on the train and more for rides at the amusement parks. Most kids fell asleep exhausted on the train on the way home. All paid for by the miners contributing a few bob each week out of their pay.

 

 

 

 

 

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Day trip to Skeggy in a Hillman Husky , my dad got out of the car to stretch his legs every  2 hour. He was used to working in a Stint of 2'10" high down pit but found it hard to drive further than Nottingham without a stretch and a Park Drive. Good memories

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Fishing trips to Brid' organised by Bestwood Miners Welfare, crates of ale on board for trip up, on to a boat where we stood shoulder to shoulder around the boat with rods like brush handles & big wooden reels, but did catch some cod!! always someone hanging over the side 'ground bating' with ale & sarnies...........ROOOOOOOOOOOOOOOTH.............skipper would gut the catch on the way back in to Brid', & throw 'em up for gulls, occasionally a gull would miss & you'd get a faceful of guts..........ROOOOOOOOOOOOOOOTH, again!!, off the boat into the pub then another crate or two bought for refreshments on the way back, dropped off at Top House for a lock in!! Them were the days!!

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  • 1 year later...

PMJ7eVj.jpg

 

Standard Of England pub, Park Lane,Basford,     Three generations of David's family in the old

2nd left is David's great grandmother Hannah Oldham, 3rd left David's grandmother Mary Lane (always known as Polly), and 1st right David's mother Rosamund Lye. 4th left is Blanche Scrivens who lived next door to David's family .

David doesn't know the others perhaps someone can enlighten him

thanks to David Lye for the photo & info

 

Don't know how ive done this,,but on the picture are all my Grandparents,,photo taken in the ''Standard of England'' Park lane Old Basford,,i would think early 50s,,whoever David is who posted in Bygones i don't know,but i thank him anyway.

             Grandad Ben is on the far left,,served in France and the Navy in first world war,,man of few words but when he spoke,''you took notice''..........my other Grandad Jackson is the one in the trilby,,3 piece suit and fob watch,,very smart man,, served in the Sherwood Foresters 14-18 war,,saw his wounds when he was taking a bath in front of the fire when i was little,, absolutely loved the man,,..........Lady far right is the only one still with us,,my lovely cousin Doris Booth,, i know some of my Booth cousins have a peep at nottstalgia at times,,enjoy.

                  Sorry its on ''Day trips'' was trying to post summat else  lol,,   by the way where they were all sat in the Standard of England'' was next to the Piano and known as ''Jacko's corner''       

 

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Just as an overider to those happy days took my Donna in there in 1985,,told her how nice it was,, silly me,, expecting happy people all singing to the Piano player,,no,, had to witness two bullies slapping an old fella at the bar,, all in their 50s,,and complete cretins,,couldnt help but step in,, got barred ,(thought Donna would leave me before we got started), no one singing or even smiling,,and no Piano in sight,, very sad,, the place closed down a few years later and is now housing,, drive past now and again and the old Bulwell stone walls that i used to climb as a kid are still there,, if they could talk they'd tell a tale................

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1 hour ago, benjamin1945 said:

PMJ7eVj.jpg

 

S. 4th left is Blanche Scrivens      

 

4TH left is Louise Scriven,, my lovely Grandma who lived to 99.............god bless her..............

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Yes kerry fred (sonny) was my uncle,,lovely man, married to my mams (joan) sister the lovely doris,,was your mam Ann? 

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Day Trips Ben..

 

I recall a few coach trips to the coast. but they all seem to merge into one.  That last few miles through Skeggy or wherever.. along flat straight roads.. desperately trying to see the Sea.. then suddenly some kid would shout 'I can see it!!'  Off the coach and down to the beach which was always overcrowded.  Those WW2 DUKWs patrolling by the water's edge. ...  Chips, rock and pop.

It always seemed a bit sad at the end as we sat outside some pub while Dad had a pint and we watched the little pennants flapping at the top of the masts of sailing boats moored up.  And I always wondered how rich you had to be to own one of those..  And getting home ... having to be woken up on the coach to get the last few hundred yards home..

 

We once did a coach trip to Heathrow.  Did the 12 mile circuit around the perimeter and never saw a single plane so much as move.  What a swizz!!

 

My best day trips were with school. Did one about 1959 from Henry Whipple School to watch a schoolboy international at Wembley.  Another one from  High Pavement school to London Zoo.  Bit disappointing, but the train ride there and back was always a 'hoot'. Lts of train spottng.. seeng Geat Western Locos which never straued to Nottm..

 

Best ever was to the Science Museum in South Kensington, which also took in the  Victoria and Albert and the Natural History Museum.  I can still recall sitting in the Cafeteria as the radio played 'Runaway' by Del Shannon. Exhibits included Rover's Gas Turbine Car, lots of working models of steam engines in cases which worked if you dropped a penny in.. that sort of stuff... and a pendulum on a very long wire which demonstrated the Earth's motion...apparently..

 

 

 

 

 

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8 hours ago, benjamin1945 said:

Yes kerry fred (sonny) was my uncle,,lovely man, married to my mams (joan) sister the lovely doris,,was your mam Ann? 

 

Sorry Kerry,, ignore about your Mam being Ann,, just worked it out your Dad was one of the Booth brothers......yes?

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14 hours ago, benjamin1945 said:

Just as an overider to those happy days took my Donna in there in 1985,,told her how nice it was,, silly me,, expecting happy people all singing to the Piano player,,no,, had to witness two bullies slapping an old fella at the bar,, all in their 50s,,and complete cretins,,couldnt help but step in,, got barred ,(thought Donna would leave me before we got started), no one singing or even smiling,,and no Piano in sight,, very sad,, the place closed down a few years later and is now housing,, drive past now and again and the old Bulwell stone walls that i used to climb as a kid are still there,, if they could talk they'd tell a tale................

 

Went in there some years ago before it closed.  It was grim then too.  But I've been thinking Ben.  If it was early 1950s, it's no surprise that 'Bestwooders' would be in there.  There was no pub actually on ( The proper) Bestwood Estate.  So the nearest, depending which side of the estate you lived on, would be: Oxclose on Oxclose Lane, The Heathfield on Heathfield Rd and the Park Tavern a bit further down Arnold Rd. then maybe the Newstead Abbey on St Alban's Rd and that's yer lot.  The first and only pub ever on Bestwood Est proper was the Deerstalker, built sometime in the mid 50s. I remember it being built.  The Green Barrel came much later and wasn't technically on Beswood Estate as it was on the wrong side of Arnold Rd. The (New) Golden Ball opposite the old Bulwell Common Station entrance was handy too, but not built until early 60s as I recall.

 

Quite a few pubs came and went on Bestwood Park, Top Valley, Rise Park area, but all later. As I recall only the Duke of St Albans and a couple of social clubs still going.  Oh.. there's the new 'Tuck and Tanner' on Top Valley Way (which was 'Lover's Lane' when we were kids), but initial reports aren't promising.  The 'lost pubs' of that area include The Charles II ( Charlie Two), Harvester's, Royal Hunt. And on Bestwood Park,  Cavalier and Nell Gwyn.  I think there may have more up there but can't recall names.

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