benjamin1945

Lest we forget

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most of us recall the hard times our parents had 50 or 60 years ago,and i think we are duty bound to ensure our kids and Grandkids know of them aswell,so they fully appreciate all the advantages they have today.

heres just a few,

getting the coal in,

chopping wood to make the fire,

wash day,with a dolly tub and ponch,

oven shelf for a water bottle,

make do and mend,

rations,

no telly,

no double glazing

no central heating,

i am sure you can add many more!

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Keeping milk in summer in a bucket of cold water under the kitchen sink. isitsafe

Ice on the inside of my bedroom window in winter. noblue

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The phone was not in your pocket, it was in a red box at the end of the road!

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How did people manage to walk along the street without having to keep looking down at their phone all the time?

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On Facebook I have friends in their twenties who long for their own 'good old days' when they were young. It will never end. :mellow:

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most of us recall the hard times our parents had 50 or 60 years ago,and i think we are duty bound to ensure our kids and Grandkids know of them aswell,so they fully appreciate all the advantages they have today.

heres just a few,

getting the coal in,

chopping wood to make the fire,

wash day,with a dolly tub and ponch,

oven shelf for a water bottle,

make do and mend,

rations,

no telly,

no double glazing

no central heating,

i am sure you can add many more!

As I have solid fuel central heating - I still get the coal in (well coke anyway)

I still chop wood to make the fire - keeps you warm twice - once when you are cutting/chopping it and again when you are burning it!

No telly? Might as well not have one when you look at the *** that is on it.

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Winding the living room clock up every night, and winding the alarm clock in the bedroom up.

"Backing" the fire up with slack before going to bed.

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No car.

No inside privy.

No hot running water. Tin bathtub hanging on the wall outside.

No supermarkets.

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No telephone - of any kind!

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Reading the squares of newspaper while sitting on the "throne"..

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I had a mate who swore blind that outside loos did not & never existed !!

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He must have had a posh upbringing...LOL

Hell!!! Even our house at Clifton Estate had one outside loo and the one upstairs in the bathroom when we were relocated from the Meadows in the early 70's.... The Meadows house had only one outside loo, my parents around the corner on Kirke-White Street had an outside loo......He must have been posh...LOL

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our house at Clifton Estate had one outside loo and the one upstairs in the bathroom

Likewise. That was luxury.

Two aunts who lived on Garden Street in Radford only had access to one toilet which was outside in the yard and it was shared by several other houses.

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When my Mum took on being Manageress of the new Lady Bay shop on Alfred Street South in the late 50's, it was my first introduction to a bathroom and inside loo. The original loo for the house was down the bottom of the long shared back yard, and it was a set of shared loos, two houses to one loo..

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Bobs for the gas & leccy meters, two bobs for the telly. (Dad taking back off telly to bypass meter)

Esso blue (boom boom boom) paraffin for the smelly heater thing.

Getting into a freezing cold bed.

Putting newspaper in front of the fire to draw it, & panic when it caught fire.

Outside toilet freezing up.

Red marks on legs from standing too close to the fire.

Chilblains.

More when I remember..

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Chilblains, God, they were horrible, and hot aches, chapped lips, wrinkly toes cos they had been wet all day at school.

Kids with purple blobs on their head, impetigo , styes, boils. Oh Lord, aren't kids lucky today.

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Gas man coming to empty the meter, counting out the pennies, and after giving mum the rebate coiling them into paper rolls, god his leather satchel must have been heavy by the end of the day.

When your computer was called a ..............................brain.

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I used to get told off for toasting my toes in front of the fire, "that'll give you chilblains" Mam trilled. They did go red & hurt but don't think I had full blown chilblains, probably hot aches. Always seemed to be kids with cotton wool sticking out of their tabs..

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Nah - that was their brains falling out ! Having said that I used to suffer appalling earache at times ("otitis media" the doctor wrote on the note for school).

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Starting handles for cars. Our first radio ran on an accumulator which periodically dad had to take to a little shop off Alfred St to get charged up. It looked like a glass car battery. Any of you electrical experts know what it was. Sugar in blue paper bags that went crusty because the larder was damp.

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Going to goose fair where all the rides were playing different records, & when the ride started the lights dimmed & the record slowed down with the voltage drop from the starting load.

Radio Luxembourg fading in & out.

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They still make lead acid batteries with glass cases basfordlad, all the telephone exchange batteries we used at collieries had those six volt types set up as a 48 volt battery as power back up. Easy to see the electrolyte levels.

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