Recommended Posts

I have"nt got a clue with anything to do with DIY or owt mechanical,just completly bored me when i was young.I was the only one in my class who refused to stay back after school and take our science teachers motor bike to bits and then reassemble it.

"WHAT" i thought! are they real. however over the years ive realised this must have cost me a fortune.

Simple ( to most blokes anyway ) tasks about the home or car are beyond me,and have always had to pay someone to do them.

would love to hear from any "soul mates" among you,

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 71
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I am completely useless at DIY, if the wife wants a shelf putting up or anything like that, she gets the tool box out and does it herself, for one birthday the kids got together and brought her a pink

Smart arse

We were never taught how to repair cars either. It was simply lack of money that taught me to replace plugs, filters, dynamos and water pumps etc. It was easy in the days of Cortinas and vivas. I wou

I seem to have gone the other way, I did all the school practical stuff, mechanical,joinery etc and did all the diy stuff myself when I got married, things like complete car stripdowns, wall building around the gardens,decorating, fitting my own double glazing etc but now just can't be bothered and would sooner pay the experts to do it, just don't seem to get the time myself anymore

Rog

Link to post
Share on other sites

We were never taught how to repair cars either. It was simply lack of money that taught me to replace plugs, filters, dynamos and water pumps etc. It was easy in the days of Cortinas and vivas. I wouldn't know where to start on modern cars. I used to do a lot of DIY on my home but replacing switches and plugs is a big no-no these days. I am glad of one thing. Domestic Consumer Units. My first home had the old fuse box. What fun we had (!!??) trying to thread fuse wire in candle light when a fuse blew after dark.

  • Upvote 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I would have loved to have been a bricklayer or roof tiler. I watch a lot of these renovation programmes and I am fascinated by the resilience and dedication of the subjects who have undertaken the task of using recycled materials to bring back to life some beautiful properties. Well done to them.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Turned my hand to most things, vehicles are getting a tad complicated, but can still change out brake pads and linings, even a caliper change, plumbings a breeze, woodworking I love, electrics were my stock in trade, was trained as a Mech/Elec, love fault finding on electronics..Can lay bricks, in a fashion, LOL..Drywallings a breeze as is roofing, built my own house, maintain my diesel tractor, into ham radio, so tower work is OK as long as it's a tilt over or crank down, knees are screwed up.. Could go on but there wouldn't be enough room...

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm like you Benjamim1945, totally useless.The woodwork & metalwork teachers (Piggy Roberts & Mr Marciniak at Trent Bridge) depaired at my uselessness, nearly everything I made went wrong, had the cane off both of them for ruining my work. I'm no better now, I've got a reclining chair that doesn't anymore, I can see what's wrong (broken bowden cable) but can't think how to fix it without lots of complicatedness & fuss, SWMBO has been shouting about it for months. I can just about mow the grass although I sometimes run over plants. My late father-in-law was a DIY expert, SWMBO asks why I can't be more like him, I just hang my head in shame.. :) :)

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a bit opposite, tend to be able to pick up skills pretty quick (well used to anyway)

My old man had an old Austin A40 with a twisted cylinder head, and I watched a mechanic do the head gasket once then did it next time the gasket failed myself.

Took me a while to get the valve clearances but soon got the hang of that. I was 14 at the time. Eventually we had the head re built and skimmed and solved the original problem.

I was a sparky by trade, built my own house in Australia , yes including the brickwork, but again my dad was a builder so I was laying bricks from about 12 years old !

Taught myself to plaster, tile, lay timber floors, weld, mig/tig, built two alloy plate boats, several trailers, rebuilt two classic cars, made furniture the list goes on, not bragging here, I suppose I'm just lucky I guess.

I now have to pay to have my truck serviced though as I can no longer crawl underneath with crook knees and back :-((

My eldest son has two degrees a high flying job but has six thumbs on each hand and cannot hold a hammer too good.

  • Upvote 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I drywalled the walls in my house, "Gyprocked" as it's known here, so only joints are "mudded" plastered and sanded smooth.

Plastering would screw me up, a skill that's learned through mostly practice, much like welding.

I maintain anyone can do anything if they really want to...

During my apprenticeship, I worked with older tradesmen, one of the things I hated was being up to the elbows in hydraulic oil in the haulage end of a coal cutting machine, I still hate being covered in oil.

The experience left me with more skills though.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems like the electrical trade is a good starter for a lot of other skills. In rewiring a house, you've got to be able to re- plaster the holes you made, do a bit of carpentry etc. got my car experience on my first car. 57 Ford Pop. Couldn't afford to keep taking it for oil changes and such. Just kept going from there. In these days there are some great DIY videos on Youtube. Some of them are really helpful. Built two computers now. Not so great at electronic troubleshooting. Just seems easier and cheaper to figure out which circuit board is the problem and just replace it rather than trying to figure out which component is the trouble.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well feel alot better now,i am not on my own altogether :biggrin:

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have always been handy maybe just because I enjoy it.

Did metal work at Ellis they had a great craft room with brazing hearths, lathes pedestal drills etc. Dad was an engineer first engine rebuild was a Morris 1000 on his work bench would be about 12 or 13.

6 years an appro with East Midlands Gas like many others you must do a bit of building work and joinery its part of the job.

Use to make custom revolvers and pistols when I was in the firearms trade, before they were banned is this country.

One of the few things that buggers me now are modern motor vehicles you don't seem able to do much at all with the engines unless you have a few grands worth of diagnostic kit.

The days of suck, squeeze, bang, blow have long gone.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Dad was good at doing things, he worked on trepaners & then on the shot-firer section at Bestwood workshops. He bought me a mecano set one Christmas, thought it might make me more practical, I didn't follow the plans, I just made things up as I went along, he used to shout at me & say "you've got to learn to follow plans" but I never did.

I'm OK with theory, I can understand how electrons & holes work in transistors, but get me to solder one on a circuit board & solder goes everywhere but where it's needed. You'd get dry joints on dry joints... :)

  • Upvote 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

#16,love your last line ,newbasfordlad,aand all i can say is, "TELL ME ABOUT IT" :biggrin:

  • Upvote 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

#17, :biggrin: AND YOURS IS NEARLY AS GOOD COLLY :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin:

Link to post
Share on other sites

You think Colly's joking about electrons and holes in transistors??? That's the stupid theory they taught us, holes moving through solids.....LOL

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

You think Colly's joking about electrons and holes in transistors??? That's the stupid theory they taught us, holes moving through solids.....LOL

NO SHIT! :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: oh this is killing me !

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have always been handy maybe just because I enjoy it.

Did metal work at Ellis they had a great craft room with brazing hearths, lathes pedestal drills etc. Dad was an engineer first engine rebuild was a Morris 1000 on his work bench would be about 12 or 13.

6 years an appro with East Midlands Gas like many others you must do a bit of building work and joinery its part of the job.

Use to make custom revolvers and pistols when I was in the firearms trade, before they were banned is this country.

One of the few things that buggers me now are modern motor vehicles you don't seem able to do much at all with the engines unless you have a few grands worth of diagnostic kit.

Dad was good at doing things, he worked on trepaners & then on the shot-firer section at Bestwood workshops. He bought me a mecano set one Christmas, thought it might make me more practical, I didn't follow the plans, I just made things up as I went along, he used to shout at me & say "you've got to learn to follow plans" but I never did.

I'm OK with theory, I can understand how electrons & holes work in transistors, but get me to solder one on a circuit board & solder goes everywhere but where it's needed. You'd get dry joints on dry joints... :)

#16,love your last line ,newbasfordlad,aand all i can say is, "TELL ME ABOUT IT" :biggrin:

The days of suck, squeeze, bang, blow have long gone.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You didn't know holes can travel through solids????? LOL I still marvel at theories myself.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Read a recent theory that the transistor effect is acually due to 'quantum entanglement'. It was drilled into us on the 'Army signalers course' that electrons went one way & holes the other, must admit I understood valves better, they seemed to make more sence to me..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes it's still standard taught theory about holes moving through solids..I never could accept that theory.

I self studied vacuum tubes, as we still use them in the amateur service in RF amplifiers... I still cannot accept electrons going one way and current the other way, as is the so called accepted theory of thermionic emmission..

Space charge sure, it's visable as a blue cloud around the cathode when current is blocked by the grid in tubes with three elements or more.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...