carni

Where Did They All Go

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I was just having a browse through Picture The Past this morning, while I enjoyed me cuppa char and Rich Tea biccies and generally relaxing. I was particularly looking at the three different sections of Alfred St; North, Central and South. What came into my mind was the amount of small businesses that were established on these three roads and It struck me, as to what ever happened to all of those people who's lively hood was taken away by the demolition of these areas. It must have been devastating for so many people, and I doubt if many of them where able to set up again in other areas. It must have been the end of so many family traditions. This must have happened throughout Nottingham City, where the demolition was happening. So very sad. I was not living in the city center at this time and I can't imagine how It must have felt for these people to lose there businesses as well as their homes. Where did they all go?

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I'd guess they answer is that most of those business owners found themselves having to look for something else to do

I can think of the example of what happened at Willoughby Street, Lenton. That was an area with a lot of shops similar to Alfred Street/Arkwright St/Denman Street. When Willoughby Street was cleared, the council designed a shopping precinct which was supposed to replace all the old shops which had been there for years. Back in the 60s they thought that years of history could be replaced by a few concrete boxes. http://goo.gl/maps/SQ0S4

The precinct was never successful, a few businesses tried but didn't last long, and at the moment it is still standing, although most of the units have been empty and boarded up for years. I suspect the precinct will be for the chop soon.

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Hopefully, most retired comfortably and reasonably well off, but I doubt it. They probably had to go out and work for somebody else.

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I know the shops I used in the early 60s, mainly Woodborough road, Huntingdon St end, had older people serving in them, I imagine they would probably have passed them on to the next generation, if they hadn't been flattened. Some of the owners would have retired but no one looked as if they had enough money to just finish work. I'm sorry to admit but I never spared a thought for what happened to all of these people, I think that must have been because I was no longer in Nottingham, and didn't witness it happening, it just struck me how many shops there were, when I was on PTP his morning. there must have been 100s of small businesses come to an end. We have the shopping Precincts here as well and they can look so desolate with the barred windows, but that is a sign of the times! No character to them at all! Can anyone remember the name of the shop on Woodborough road, just of Huntingdon St, that sold all kinds of nuts, I first tried Tiger Nuts from there (No not that Kind)! I used to buy some every day on my way to work. I haven't seen any for years, any one else like them, they were all wrinkly and light brown in colour?

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I don't know the names of any nut shops.....but on the question of where did the shopkeepers from Alfred Street all go to?

Similar to my theory about Willougbhy Street shops, the Alfred Street shopkeepers were presumably supposed to move to the Marple Square precinct which was near the bottom of Woodborough Road. But that was a failure as well.

PTP only has one photo of it, and it sums it up very well. http://www.picturethepast.org.uk/frontend.php?action=printdetails&keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;NTGM015916&prevUrl=

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Thanks CliffTon,

It doesn't quite have the attraction of those little shops, and the characters who served us with our 5 Park Drives and 1/4 of Chocolate Limes in a little pointy white bag, held by the top corners and twizzled over until it was closed tightly. :rolleyes:

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My dad was a french polisher and at one time had two shops on Alfred Street Central opposite Cooper Street. It was no secret that the place was going to be bulldozed so those that stayed did so knowing they would be packing up. There were very few shops making any money (Apart from my Dad who made enough between '63 and '68 to buy a house for cash in Colwick.) When Alfred St went he opened a shop next to the Bendigo in Sneinton but it was never the same. By then he was in his 60s and emigrated to my older brothers in Sydney. He died aged 70. My Mum lived on until last year when she was 93 and is buried at Bathusrt. In the shop opposite to my dad's was Mary and Alec who were for most of their lives travelling with the fairs. They had a fruit and veg shop and eked out a meager living frozen stiff in the winter of '63.. They always had the dream of a getting a B&B at Skeggie but it never happened. They both died shortly after the shop closed.

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Thank you for sharing your Parents and Mary and Alec's story, I did wonder if any of the shop keepers tried to set up elsewhere. Sorry to hear that the shop in Sneinton was not as successful as they had hoped for, I imagine that was probably the same for a number of others who tried again at other locations. I hope they were happy in their home at Colwick. It is sad to hear that Mary and Alec died without their dream coming true. I wonder how many other lives were shattered in the areas of Demolition?

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I don't know about Alfred Street shops but I can tell you about 2 shops that closed, in the early 1970s when they pulled down Arkwright street, an army surplus shop called Anglo American moved to Radford road for a few years, then closed after the owner teamed up with the owner of Anchor Army Surplus, who are still going in the Meadows near the cattle market.

The other shop is a pet shop called Willis and Jameson, the owner Peter when it closed, went to a company delivering eggs and after a few years was made unemployed, then he went on a carpenters course, and now he is a self-employed joiner living in Sherwood.

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The Attenborough Model Railway model and bookshop business moved from Arkwright Street to the upper floor of a shop on Derby Road (think it was no. 273) up past Canning Circus.

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So many areas in Nottingham were affected by the Demolition and so many lives probably turned upside down. I hope that there are some happy endings for people, as I am sure there must be some sad ones.

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an army surplus shop called Anglo American moved to Radford road for a few years, then closed after the owner teamed up with the owner of Anchor Army Surplus, who are still going in the Meadows near the cattle market.

I remember this Arkwright St shop well.

In 1970 myself and a mate (John the mad one) purchased for the sum of ten shillings each, Ex 'Civil Defence' Army Great coats.

Even after cutting the bottoms off with a pair of scissors, they dragged along the ground as we walked through town, got a few strange looks.

It later became the fashion to wear them. Trendsetters eh ? :)

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I remember this Arkwright St shop well.

In 1970 myself and a mate (John the mad one) purchased for the sum of ten shillings each, Ex 'Civil Defence' Army Great coats.

Even after cutting the bottoms off with a pair of scissors, they dragged along the ground as we walked through town, got a few strange looks.

It later became the fashion to wear them. Trendsetters eh ? :)

I got an ex army great coat from there in 1971, it lasted for years, I finally got rid of it in the late 1990s, after years of loyal service, I used to wear it a lot when with Greenpeace along with a large felt hat in the winter, the others used to call me the Tramp, because they said wearing it I looked like an old time tramp, :)

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I remember the Anglo Army stores well as it was one of my favorite places to hang out looking at all the ex army stuff.

Bought lots of clothing and electronic gear etc. Still go and browse Anchor sales near the old cattle market when I visit my old home town.

Can also remember Anchor being up near Eastwood or Huthweight, (sp) or somewhere around there, that was where they kept all the big stuff and more interesting pieces.

When the old Ark Royal was decommissioned they had a heap of gear in their yard, I bought a pair of Barr and Stroud binoculars for 10 pounds with leather case, only sold them a couple of years ago for well over $150au to an ozzy collector.

Superb optics with variable filters but big and heavy.

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The Attenborough Model Railway model and bookshop business moved from Arkwright Street to the upper floor of a shop on Derby Road (think it was no. 273) up past Canning Circus.

Arkwright Street http://www.picturethepast.org.uk/frontend.php?action=printdetails&keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;NTGM018610&prevUrl=

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In answer to where the businesses go. I can only look at what would be a logical answer in the modern times. First of all one must remember that technology has moved forward a lot since the 1960s. Most shops from Alfred street and indeed big shopping streets that have disappeared would have been offered units in precincts or such like. If they could not afford the obviously higher rents they would finish. Small businesses like the mentioned French polishers would probably relocate where there are custom built business units, again if they could afford the extra rent. All along the A38 between the M1 and Mansfield are huge modern business parks built on the site of open fields or heavy industry. These are quite expensive places to rent but are a lot more energy efficient than the old mills that were used in the 1960s. The old Metal Box company in Mansfield transferred to smaller premises and saved thousands on energy. This must have been a similar situation to many businesses in Nottingham.

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Alfred Street I have a Kelly's directory for the city dated 1950 & all businesses are listed there were Seven public houses at that time

Mechanic's Arms

Bay Horse

Freeman's Arms

Fox & Crown

Alfred the Great

Empress Euginnie

Criterion

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around 1982, 'Nolly' Buck, Jazz drummer, lived on an old Motor torpedo boat moored near Hazzleford Ferry.

It was complete with two huge Rolls Royce engines

From Anchor Store he bought a Navy Communications receiver in several large parts which he bolted into the boat.

Needing the leads to connect it all together, He contacted the manufacturer... name escapes me. Began with M?

They told him it should never have been sold to the public as it was current Navy issue. He did eventually find the leads

by searching through all the baskets at Anchor.

He used it to communicate with ships on the North sea, who were amazed they were talking to a WWII Motortorpedo boat on the Trent.

Last I saw of Nolly, he was on Central ITV news, his boat had sunk!

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Anchor Supplies out of town store was and still is on Peasehill Rd, Ripley. Last time I was up that way they had a Chieftain tank parked in the yard.

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I was thinking of Anchor Stores the Cattle Market Nottingham.

They had a great museum of articles in glass cases

Not been to the Ripley one for 5 years or more.

Anchor Supplies

www.anchorsupplies.com

Ripley Depot
These are images from our Ripley Depot based in Derbyshire

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Having been away from this site for quite a while,i have returned to add to this thread. I worked for the gas board on Woodboro Rd from 1959 and of course carried the tools all over Nottm and so remember with fondness many of the cafes,the routine was depot 7.45am to 8.30am and then off to the cafe for breakfast till 9.30am and hope the reps don't come around and catch us.This went on for many years but slowly died when 'Bonus" came in because then you could earn upto an extra 60% of your wages by doing around 13hrs work in 8hrs not to be sneezed at.

So lets get back to the point(shops) on Woodboro Rd just down from the gas board on opp side was small bakery which was run by an irish lady used to be very popular and she use to make potted meat rolls to order as you waited and the reason I remember her is because she made our wedding cake in 1965 (my wife was in the rag trade and worked for Manny Axlerod off Alfred St) but thats another story.

I also remember a very small cafe (corner shop) on Alfred st north it was on the r/hand side heading downhill,one room which was the front corner of the shop you went in the door right on the corner and there was just two benches going around to your left and right so seated at the most 10/12 pax think the owner and seemed to be the only person I remember was a David(i think) he used to do a set lunch ,if you hung around talking he was keen you at least purchased another cup of tea(quite right too ) it must have been hard to make a living.

We returned to Nottm 79/81 and had the Honeycoombe Cafe in West End Arcade for some of that time so I know money does not come easy.

There enough of me boring you for now but will write again (HI Mickey Booth)

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Trevorthegasman

One of the shops I remember from my child hood, was that very same Cafe you have mentioned on Alfred St North. My Grandparents and relations all lived close by and one of our treats was to be taken in the Cafe occasionally. Our mam used to tell us all to be very good and sit still or the lady would not let us stay in the cafe. We always had a cheese cob each and a drink of pop, I always think of the cafe without fail after all these years (1950s) if we have A cheese cob in a cafe anywhere. Its nice to read of someone else remembering that Cafe.

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I don't know the names of any nut shops.....but on the question of where did the shopkeepers from Alfred Street all go to?

Similar to my theory about Willougbhy Street shops, the Alfred Street shopkeepers were presumably supposed to move to the Marple Square precinct which was near the bottom of Woodborough Road. But that was a failure as well.

PTP only has one photo of it, and it sums it up very well. http://www.picturethepast.org.uk/frontend.php?action=printdetails&keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;NTGM015916&prevUrl=

Oddly enough one of the shops I frequently visit when I am in Nottingham is Asiana supermarket which is very close to where that photo was taken.

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For most of my developing years I lived in Bobbers Mill Road (before joining the army) and I do get the opportunity to visit Hyson Green. Much of it is still recognisable, even T W Raithby's shop is still intact, although run by Polish. I must admit to some fun in Hyson Green and up Radford Road as I speak Russian, and it has a tendency to wind the Poles up a little ( or a lot).

I often visit the supermarket which used to be Fine Fare on the crossroads of Gregory Boulevard and Radford Road. Even now I visit the Medina supermarket on the opposite side of the road and think, "This was Woolworths"

It was a great joy to board a tram at Hucknall which bore the name "Erica Beardsmore" I remember Erica and her husband running a shop on Bobbers Mill Road before they took up the shop where the tram stop is now.

Its a pity that the Old G is boarded up. In my day, I was never fond of the pub, I much preferred either the Clock or the Wheatsheaf. The Wheatsheaf is boarded up and the Clock doesnt seem that far behind being closed. (At least the Nag's Head is open)

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