You Think English Is Easy?


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English is becoming like politics and religion. It generates discussions, debates and also arguments. Never to be brought up in a pub.

In school we were taught that dived was the correct past form of dive. Over the years things have changed and even in some parts of Britain dove was used as the past form of dive, but more in spoken language than in the written form. Many of the regular verbs have taken on the use of an irregular past participle as an additional past form and vice versa. We as individuals have the right to decide which past participle we want to use. Both are acceptable now, even the British English international test (IELTS) accepts both forms of the verb. I personally prefer dived but I also cannot force my opinion onto students, so I must teach both as correct.

There are now 3 recognised International English languages.

1. British English.

2. American English

and in recent years a third one has been added

3. Australian English.

So as a teacher of English to foreign students imagine the problems I have when teaching English.

I have students who tell me I cannot spell when I spell theatre and not theater, or harbour and not harbor. Even my spell check is telling me I am wrong now. I have also had problems with students telling me I pronounce words wrong when I use the British pronunciation.

I believe the English language can be fun. I still believe this is an excellent topic. But lets not turn it into a fighting ring. Lets enjoy this topic the way Micheal Booth wanted it to be FUN. So if you can add to this great. If not, just sit back and enjoy the fun of your own language

But let us all be proud of the fact that the English language originated in Britain, and it is our language that has been accepted as the basis for the International English languages. let us accept the changes. Another thing too. British English was originally accepted by America, they just had to make a few minor adjustments to a great language so they could call it American English.

Have a great day everyone and please remember ENGLISH IS FUN

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A lot of words used stateside are actually the original British spellings, it works both side of the pond, one country changes the spellings over time.

Good book Iv'e posted about on here a long time back, and WELL worth reading, "The Mother Tongue, English & How It Got That Way" by Bill Bryson..Excellant reading!!

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And thank you too Micheal Booth.

Please keep adding to this topic. Don't forget idioms.

It is a steal. Steal is to take something that is not yours. The idiom means It is a bargain.

Another one. You can soar as high as you want to go. But never cry when you arm is sore.

I want to go to the fair tomorrow, I hope it is a fair day and we get fair prices on the rides.

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Shakespeare wouldn't recognize modern UK English, I doubt he'd even understand anyone today. To his ears we'd be speaking a foreign language..

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I agree Merthyr Imp. I studied Shakespeare at school, just as most of us did, but never enjoyed it even though I got a decent pass in O Level English Literature. I've been to the theatres in Stratford-upon-Avon and other locations a few times to watch his plays just to see if I could enjoy/understand a little better but unfortunately I still find his works difficult. We have The Complete Works of Shakespeare on our bookshelf at home but that's hard going too.

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Anos Anos mikingdum fur Anos! Guess where I come from? :biggrin:

BIRMINGHAM ?

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benjamin,

I was hoping it was Nottingham! But it looks like I have been living in "The Black Country" longer than I thought. Oh No, I had better start brushing up on "Mi Ducks and Ayups". :huh: :biggrin:

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Was half-listening to the wife chatting on the phone last night, in Polish, to her friend.

Over the years, I've learned enough Polish to follow what's being discussed, and last night's topic was Easter breakfast, a proper Polish tradition. This is mostly cold meats, boiled eggs, and a few other things.

They were discussing the horseradish sauce the missus had bought to serve with the meats, and tucked in between the fluent Polish chatter came "it blows your bleddy 'ead off".

Doesn't look like there is a Polish equivalent to Nottinghamese!

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BUT, is it an American word, or an old English word commonly used this side of the pond Kath?? I'd have to check, but I'm guessing it's a left over word from colonial times like dove, as in I dove in the river...

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I come up with hudreds of explanations on "drug and drag" Drug, middle English fron old French drogue.

There's a thought drug comes about from dialect , in the meaning of drag..But it appears correct in both forms. Haven't got time to research more this morning, got to get a few things done.

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