Vintageann

Saturday jobs

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Yes Hippo Girl it was Masons thankyou for jogging my memory or whats left of it!!!!

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When I left Masons I had a Sunday job washing cars at 7/6d a go and one of my customers was Everard Mills mine host of the Rose and Crown at Lenton another was a Jewish gentleman Irvine Korn who lived in Beeston and was in the rag trade a good friend of Michael Flitterman son of Sid Flitterman of Flittermans stores.Michael and his brother Laurence had a mens wear store in Hockley and in my mid teens I worked there.

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BPS greengrocers shop on Beeston high road, 8 am - 5-30 pm,the pay was 1 pound two shillings,I was 14,It beat delivering papers twice a day,six days a week for 12 bob,in all kinds of weather.

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Anyone remember Skills toy shop at the corner of West End Arcade and Angel Row? It was owned by one of the Skills brothers, the other one owned Skills coaches. It was an incredible shop, packed with every toy a 1960's kid could wish for. The shelves were crammed and the aisles narrow. My favourites were the Sacha dolls, they looked so classy. I worked there on Saturdays when I was at school as well as when I went to college, full time in the holidays.

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Thanks Cliff Ton. Yes, the coaching aspect seemed to last longer. There was a Skills toyshop on the upper level of the Broadmarsh centre when it was new, but that is no longer there either. Another casualty of the superstore maybe?

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I worked in Dewhursts the Butchers in Beeston every Saturday 1968-early 1969 Not much money if I remember but I did bring home the Sunday joint!

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Did the delivery bike thing for a mini market on Radford rd then the paper route for the newsagent on Lambourne Dr.

But the best job was Billy Smarts Circus tons of money & all the girls I could handle.

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As I have stated in my other post, I worked at Beecroft and Son toyshop on Pelham Street for a couple of years in the model basement. I started when I was 13 because I looked like I was 16 (tall and handsome!). It started out as Saturdays and then all week during the school holidays. I guess I was pretty good at it and I know I thoroughly enjoyed it. I tried to encourage my own Sons to get a few hours work when they were 15 and 16 but to no avail.

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My friend and I got Saturday jobs at Woolworths on Hyson Green. I was on hardware and in the spring the gardening section was on there, I’m sure I can remember having to count bulbs as they were loose and priced at so many for so much. Some people probably had a surprise when the bulbs grew as we used to get them muddled up, just didn’t have a clue. My friend ended up on the paint counter so the bulbs didn’t seem so bad after that, although she was eventually transferred to sweets. She got into trouble for eating chocolate brazils, nearly got sacked. We had to get permission from headmaster at school to have the job, he was being awkward about it so my mum went to see him, he soon gave his consent! When I left school I worked there full time until my job at Boots offices started.

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It was my ambition to work on the biscuit counter in there when I was a child. I loved that biscuit counter. Can smell it now.  They got rid of it. Had to go into teaching instead!

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I enjoyed working there, except when someone cut themselves on bacon slicer. They had an amazing canteen, the sandwiches had more filling than bread! I also worked for a while in a factory at Beeston putting fancy trimmings for furniture and clothes on cards. Think it was called jenning or something like that, didn’t stay long though as it made your hands sore. But I got the fringed trimming for my jeans for nothing, a must if you were a “mod”.

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My Saturday "job" was an extension of my weekly job, delivering newspapers. Saturday was going around the village collecting the paper money from those that hadn't gone into the shop to pay their bills. It was very lucrative as I never seemed to have the right change! so many people rounded it up to the nearest tanner, good tips for me. Saturday evening was delivering the Football Post and News.

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I took a paper route for  a year or  two.  Thankfully I never had to deal with the money side of it.  I suppose they paid at the shop.  I presume if they didn't they would no longer be on my route.

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I never had paid weekend jobs. My father always had something for me to do. Painting, decorating, gardening, car cleaning - you name it. I don’t recollect a regular payment but I was never short of cash! :biggrin:

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Worked Saturdays and occasional weekdays at TruForm on Clumber Street, around 1965/66 I would think. Next door to Spalls and across from Skinner & Rook and Linneys. Ladies department was best, unless it was raining, when they came in just to keep dry. Sitting low down peeking up skirts gets boring after a while. The firm had a Pakistani Geordie salesman; I couldn't understand a single word he said but he seemed to do ok. We were on commission, which was double on certain lines. On my second day, I cut my hour's lunch break down to 15 minutes so I could earn a few bob more, but was sent back with a flea in my ear. We also had the 'stretcher' routine, like VintageAnn, but did it on the handle of the short steps. There was a lucrative scam involving changing the punched cards, which were frequently wrong. Sell a pair for £4, send a £5 note down the chute, but with a card from a £3 pair, get £2 change back up the chute, a pound for the customer and a pound for the pocket. Of course, I didn't have anything to do with it.:rolleyes:

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Aged 14, I managed to get my ideal Saturday job at Henry Lloyd’s cycle shop in Netherfield. I was paid in parts for my racing bikes rather than cash, although I’d have happily worked for nowt as Henry taught me how to build wheels, and strip/assemble hubs, bottom brackets, derailleurs, etc.

 

 

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Interested to hear that Rob.  I really liked Henry Lloyd.  I built my Claude Butler bike from parts I bought from Henry.  He built the wheels for me.  Around 1960.  He let me buy the parts over time.  I didn't have much cash, but I wanted to have my bike.  I don't recall that he even kept much records.  I know I just wanted to pay him.  I never liked being in debt.  He just told ne not to worry about it.  Pay as you can.  Great guy.

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