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Good job you weren't in LA or San Francisco, they'd have all come outside with you .

The other day, having coffee with some friends, I said, 'so, I went and got a Biro'......My friends went, whoa back up a minute, what's a Biro? So I explained, made a sideways fist and clicked my thum

corsey't does

Ya want to clean ya lugholes aaht! Lugholes is not used for ears where I've lived for the past 44 years but it still pops out sometimes - especially if I've had a few. Another thing I still say is "what's going off ?" when everyone else seems to say "what's going on?" - I must just be back to front, upside down or inside out - or just from Nottingham. And don't get me started on "Ay-up" :)

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One of dads words was 'shufti' as in lets have a shufti or take a shufti at this... Means take a look at...

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Mine too Brew.  He brought several words back with him from his time in India in WW2, like coggage for newspaper. Decko for look and chota pice for small change.

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How about "Blackclocks" for cockroaches.

 

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Me mam used to ask me if I  wanted a 'Chukky Egg' for tea.  I'm assuming a chukky was a chicken.  :Shock:

 

Always thought Black clocks were big black beetles, Eyeup.  Never thought they were roaches.  Yer learn summat new every day here. ;)

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On a Facebook site this morning I someone was asking if anyone had ever heard  of the expression ‘tripe hound’

I remember my dad saying it but not sure what it meant, only that it was wasn’t a compliment!

 

 

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My relative, Emily Ward, who lived in Garden Street had lots of odd sayings. In particular she would often ask, "What are you a gate?" meaning what are you up to or what are you doing.  She was born in Castle Donington in 1894 but lived most of her life in Nottinghamshire. Never heard anyone else use that term.

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It always puzzled me why a roach was called a blackclock, a couple of years back I decided to use Yahoo, pre the Google days. Lo and behold the answer was there.

Seems it was derived from German, during WW1 German POW's were put to work in the coal mines in and around Nottingham among many places. Due to pony's being stabled underground, there were roaches, I don't recall the German for roaches, but to the loacl miners it sounded like "blackclocks"

They were a pest when I was growing up in the slums of St Anns, probably due to flour being used for wall paper paste. Council used to send a chappie with a pot of creosote, he'd pull the skirting boards off and spray creosote along the bottoms of the walls.

Remember those weren't the American brown variety we find everywhere this side of the pond and in the tropics, they were the large European black roaches, maybe that's why you associate the word with large black bugs.

They have to be the most disgusting insect on earth.

 

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Don't know about the most disgusting.  The brown ones are pretty bad and it doesn't mean the place is dirty.  Mrs. L says they can nip in from a bag of spuds from the store.  They are pretty common in Ga.  I think they like the heat and humidity.

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