NickCatford

Be-Ro plant at Daybrook

Recommended Posts

Can any one tell me when the Rank Hovis McDougal (formerly Be-Ro) flour packing plant at Daybrook closed and when was it demolished. Did the present Madford retail park replace it or was the site used for something else first which was later replaced by Madford.

I have studied some old maps. The 1973 6" map shows that the plant has been extended with another building covering the old station site to the south. The 1980 6" map shows this new building has been extended almost up to Mansfield Road. The last map I have been able to find is 1989 which shows no change so presumably the plant was still operating then.

Can anyone help

Nick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The two most popular brands of flour in my days at Marsdens/Farrands in the 60s were both Notts products ie, Be-ro as mentioned and Smiths of Worksop,both used to do 3lb and 1lb bags.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I well remember the Bero flour factory near Daybrook station in the 1960s when Firbeck and myself were walking derelict railway lines. I have no idea when it closed but do know that they took over the land occupied by the derelict Daybrook station. I have since heard that both the station and the flour factory were haunted.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The plumbing company (Sturtons) I worked for in the 70s did some of the maintenance works there. It was one of the few places I disliked working, there was so much dust the dangers of explosion and fire were enormous.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Mum had the one on the right...she often said that the girl was dressed in the same outfit as her (my Mum) school uniform at Queens Walk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've still got the red cover one. My daughter used it last Saturday to make some scones (but she substituted margarine for the lard!)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember a mate of mine working there when the place closed.

As far as I can remember this would have been late '70s early '80s.

Sorry I can't be more precise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Certainly remember the right hand book. But, I had no idea that Be-Ro was a local product.

Col

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted in another thread somewhere on here, we have my mums old Bero book, like the one on right in #7, it's in a sorry state now but I managed to get a new reprint copy a few years ago on ebay, which my wife still uses for scones etc..

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone know - or remember - what Be-Ro stood for ? It was a compound word, made up from either the ingredients of the product or the company name.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had a few tenuous connections with Be Ro over the years. Initially, back in the fifties, I used to walk past the Daybrook factory every schoolday on my way to buy a return ticket at Daybrook station for the journey to Basford North on my way to Mellish. This was a train journey of about four minutes. I didn't live far enough away from the school, as the crow flies, to get a free travel pass although others who lived a few hundred yards further away had a pass even though they travelled from the same station. Such was the idiocy of those in power at the time.

Secondly, when I was in the accountancy profession, Be Ro were clients of ours although I never was assigned to that particular job.

Thirdly, Be Ro were customers of my old company. We used to make all the packaging for both the Nottingham and Newcastle Factories but this was before my time. Be Ro ultimately sold out to Rank Hovis Mcdougal.

The managing director at Daybrook was Tom Bell. His father, also Tom, founded the factory in Newcastle. The younger Tom came to Nottingham in the thirties and built the Daybrook factory. Tom built a house on Oxton Hill and was a great benefactor to Oxton village. He offered two thousand pounds towards the cost of the village hall if the village could raise the same amount (this was a large sum at the time). The money was raised and the hall was built.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was quite an article about it in NEP Bygones some time back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hre are a couple more images for BeRo:

bero_book_old_new.jpgCO022.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...