Street and Road Names, pre 1970's.


Recommended Posts

Here's a chance to add some history pre all the redevelopment of the 1970's. Add a road or street name with some history behind it or who it was named after.

The Ropewalk, old rope making area where the twine was run out and spun into ropes, hence "rope walk".

Kirke-White Street, name after Sir Henry Kirke-White.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 57
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

From the link below, it looks like some of the mens names were from Thomas  Birkin's Son's. Perhaps other names have a Lace connection.   http://www.nottsheritagegateway.org.uk/places/f

Here's some information of Cloister St....plus photos. http://www.lentontimes.co.uk/streets/cloister_st.htm

As far as anyone can be certain, that is approximately where Lenton Abbey/Priory was. The next road parallel to Cloister Street is Priory Street, which includes what is claimed to be a surviving col

Funny you should mention street names today ayup' i thought i knew Nttingham,but today i had to meet someone in Cloister st which i had never heard of.after my meeting i had a nosy round and found it interesting,a little dead end street with some very old terraced houses,behind which the river Leen meets the Nottm. Canal,must have an interesting past,and i wonderd why it would be called 'Cloister st?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Convent or monastary near by at one time??

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's some information of Cloister St....plus photos.

http://www.lentontimes.co.uk/streets/cloister_st.htm

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks ayup ,the place just intriged me,was Lenton Abbey there then Clift ton?

Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as anyone can be certain, that is approximately where Lenton Abbey/Priory was.

The next road parallel to Cloister Street is Priory Street, which includes what is claimed to be a surviving column from Lenton Priory. https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Priory+St,+Nottingham+NG7/@52.9429,-1.178637,3a,37.5y,357.6h,85.71t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1seWNjItmVNktanM452sqtKQ!2e0!4m2!3m1!1s0x4879c2175dbbd4b7:0x4307325e17aff339?hl=en

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

It was Lenton Priory, heres the history..

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenton_Priory

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Peverel Street, named after William Peverel who founded Lenton Priory.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Kind of, I could bring up streets in the redeveloped areas, but the idea is to get pre developed areas like the old St Anns, and Meadows etc.

There's still a lot of "Gates" around the City centre, they are too obvious, but for youngsters they were the gates through the city defence wall during medieval times.

Something that was pointed out to me when I was a teen, walk around the Market Square, each side of the streets have different names, that goes back to the very narrow streets of a few hundred years back.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Kind of, I could bring up streets in the redeveloped areas, but the idea is to get pre developed areas like the old St Anns, and Meadows etc.

There's still a lot of "Gates" around the City centre, they are too obvious, but for youngsters they were the gates through the city defence wall during medieval times.

Something that was pointed out to me when I was a teen, walk around the Market Square, each side of the streets have different names, that goes back to the very narrow streets of a few hundred years back.

The term 'gate' used in York street names like Walmgate, Coppergate, Stonegate and Skeldergate, derives from the Viking word 'gata' meaning street. I wonder if this is true in some cases in Nottingham too?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lenton Abbey was there.

Lenton Priory to be eaact

Last prior Nicholas Heth or Heyth 1538 (attained & hanged)

From) "The Parish and Priory of Lenton" by Edwin D. Ginever in 1930

Other streets in that area Old Church Street, Friar Street, The Friary & Abbey Street.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There's still a lot of "Gates" around the City centre, they are too obvious, but for youngsters they were the gates through the city defence wall during medieval times.

That's not the case The word gate is on old word for street.

Have a look at all the "Gates" in Nottingham & the idea that they went to the city wall does not hold

Link to post
Share on other sites

I find the name Ropewalk off Derby Road a little confusing as it certainly doesn't look like a typical Ropewalk being very long but curved. A Ropewalk is typically dead straight and rarely more than 100 yards it's purpose being the manufacture of anchor ropes and the like that have to be made in one piece.

I found there was another in Nottingham that made more sense for the choice of name.It went where the Newton Building is now on Burton Street.

Map of 1882.... X marks where the Guildhall is now.

258mj5s.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Strange that Ropewalks countrywide hardly ever survive...the buildings usually long gone, but the typical dead straight road and of course the local name showing where they used to be.

2la65vs.jpg

euq39k.jpg

1z5q91u.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought all the "Gates" in Nottm were originally gates through the city walls???

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wheeler gate; Carter gate; Fletcher gate; Bridlesmith gate; Hounds gate; etc. The road where certain trades were carried out.

Originating from the norse word "gata" meaning road or path.

eg Castle Gate being a road leading to the castle, not a gate into the Castle.

Link to post
Share on other sites

More likely called a Bar...ie Chapel Bar or if guarded a Postern (Top of Drury Hill)

As in Postern Street leading on to Park Row where the city wall used to run along, I'd imagine.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

it is correct that the 'gates' were in fact Norse for road or path. Half the town at one point was ruled by Dane law and half by Saxon law. Some years ago I was in the old shire Hall car park which is the gap in the buildings on high Pavement opposite the now galleries of justice. there were steps leading up to another car park which are now apartments. there was an archaeological din taking place and they thought they had discovered a Danish/Viking settlement. never followed it up or read any confirmation.

some of the road in the city such as Fletcher gate was originally Flesh Hewer or Huars Gate. I thought initially may have been arrow makers but this is not the case. It was as it was populated by butchers who later moved to the shambles which is now high street at the rear of the council house and exchange buildings . Pelham street was narrow and difficult to manoeuvre carts in to the town centre so it was widened and paid for by the Pelham Family hence Pelham street. I think it was Gridlemith gate or walk due to the trades working in that area and well known for their craftsmanship

Market street was once called blood lane as it was narrow and carts would often go down the hill uncontrolled and causing injury to people.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...