Dennis

Meadows memories

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Mam called butter, best butter.  I'm pretty sure we had Summer County on our bread. A step  up from Stork!

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#172. My paternal gran had a raised garden, that you had to climb half a dozen steps to reach, across the front of this was a concrete wall about 5/6 ft in height. right opposite the back door about half way up the wall was one of the meat cupboards? it had the mesh door and was embedded in the earth, the cupboard itself must have been  made of some kind of metal and sealed very well to keep the nasties out. The milk and butter was always cold, no matter how warm the weather was.

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Thats right Katy,best butter usually meant 'Tub'........Echo marg. the real poor had (almost Lard) next step up was Stork then top of the range was 'Blue Band and Summer county'............

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If I remember right the kids that bought cold toast to school for their break had Stork on it,the reason I know this is because if it was butter the butter would melt through the toast where Stork would stay on top where it was spread a bit too thick,useless info I know but info non the less

 

Rog

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Just after the war, I remember seeing my mum mix the butter with a little milk which made it go further.  I thought that was what you were supposed to do...

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I'm told that during the rationing of WW2, some people used liquid paraffin to make pastry when any other form of shortening was unavailable!

 

We had an old wartime Be-Ro cook book on the bottom shelf of the pantry when I was little with recipes for mock cream and fatless biscuits. Some of the substitute ingredients beggared belief! Yet people survived.

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plantfit #165 So many memories in that one post I could have been in my Gran's kitchen too.

A few other things that I remember. The thick stone shelf in the pantry where you put the butter, marg, milk, cheese etc to keep them cool. The metal mesh meat safe that on hot days she would put a damp towel over to keep the meat cool, the fine mesh kept the flies and other creepy crawlies out too. Above all my Grandad used to keep the brown teapot with a cream circular line round the middle on the hob to keep it warm. It was so "stewed" at the end of the day that the spoon would stand up on its own.

Also nothing from the kitchen went to waste, bones were used to make stock, then along with vegetable scraps were fed to the chooks or pigs. We never went without fresh vegetables, seasonal of course, grown in the garden or the allotment. I have to admit that apples and pears were most often scrumped from local orchards.

 

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Do any of you older Meadownians know of a Frank Fairholme . He lived around the corner of Cremorne Street onto Kirke White Street area. He emigrated to Australia about 1964.

He worked at John Jardine's on Deering Street.

Any news of him would be welcome.

 

 

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On 1/15/2015 at 6:05 PM, don walker said:

I remember david natrass he lived near goegie Burbank I do believe he lived next to the roukes who run the corner shop, correct me if I,m wrong

He's my Dad.

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On 11/25/2014 at 7:40 PM, annswabey said:

On the 1901 census, John and Gertrude Mabbott, with son Leslie, aged 1, were living at 1 Glossop Terrace in the Meadows, and in 1911, with the addition of daughter Winnifred, they were at 83 Vernon Avenue

 

These were my hubbys family….Winifred was my motherinlaw….

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