PeverilPeril

Wot appn'd to all them cobbles?

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I'm pretty sure Alpine St, Old Basford was cobbled, as I rode the 41 trolleybus down it.

It was cobbled in 1959 when I went arse over tit on my new bike after some rain.

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Must assume that steepest roads were tarmacked first due to safety.

I remember Southey St being the only tarmac street in the vicinity in the 40's.

How do kids play marbles these days? The largest holes between the cobbles gave us a selection of different skill levels. On Lake St the main marble hole was outside Roy Walkers house near to the gas lamp post. I remember it clearly due to the channel on one side leading down to the hole. Aim for the channel not the hole and you won. The other main competition hole was outside Keith Bently's house. A narrow, more challenging hole. I still play the occasional round of golf so nothing changes really :blush:

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2 nuns cycling down a cobbled street...

One says to the other, "I've never come this way before"..

The other replies.. "Must be the cobbles".

I like that Trev,..........the other reply would be........'don't pedal so fast then' !

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It continues to be Carlton Road till the junction with Dale View Road(R/H Side going out of the City) whence it becomes Carlton Hill.

Actually the change occurs a hundred or so yards away just after Lancaster Road (leaving the city). There's a cast iron Nottingham Borough boundary marker (1877) that marks the spot.

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This is the sign referred to by bamber, and which I linked to in post #6. It shows the change-over point, and is opposite Brantcliffe Avenue.

carl.jpg

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There is a cast iron on similar to a mile post on the opposite side of the road.

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I think there used to be a matched pair of boundary markers until one of them was acquired. There 's a house on Northdale Road that has a couple in the front garden.

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I am sure Cliff Ton's picture is Marple St. off Alfred St. North,looking down towards Alfred St.Used to ride our bikes down there.

The clock tower top left is the Watson Fothergill baptist church on the corner of Alfred ST.and Woodborough Rd.See Cliff Ton;s map posted on Friends of Alfred St. North.

I can remember this street being Tar Mac'd in the late 50,s along with Bangor St. one street up,they only Tar Mac'd

the flat sections not the hills.

We were roller skating on it while it was still warm.

When we were small on warm days we would dig the tar from between the cobbles with sucker sticks chew it like gum,anyone else do this?

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I am sure Cliff Ton's picture is Marple St. off Alfred St. North,looking down towards Alfred St.Used to ride our bikes down there.

Correct ! I don't know the area but that's what it says on Picture the Past.

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GJK,

When we were kids growing up in the 1950s, we would go to play near Parks Corner. There wasn't the traffic to worry about in those days. The Methodist Church was either being built or being extended! I'm afraid my memory fades abit. There would be piles of Pitch in the drive way and we would pull pieces off and chew it like gum. Don't fancy it now though.

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With regard to which streets were cobbled and which were not. Surely they would all been cobbled at some stage, just because they were there before Tarmac came our way.

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Don't forget some roads were made without cobbles

I don't think the turnpikes (made in the 18th century) were ever cobbled.

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#36 Hi Carni I remember tivey's shop on the corner, I think it was a bakers. Went out with a girl on Redland avenue in me schooldays, My goodness that was long long time ago. I had a mate who lived at the top of Redland Grove, his dad owned Bullocks removals. Yes Bullocks.

sadly he was tragicly killed working for Netherfield luxery coaches.

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With regard to which streets were cobbled and which were not. Surely they would all been cobbled at some stage, just because they were there before Tarmac came our way.

Just been looking at some of my earlier directories and there were asphalt road makers listed as early as 1860 but none were listed in 1854.

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Something not quite right here. As the process hadn't been thought of then. Yes there were Macadam roads but this was a system of laying stones and bitumen was not involved.

In 1901 Nottinghamshire County surveyor Mr Edgar Hooley was walking in Denby close to an iron works when he noticed a length of smooth road with no ruts or rain damage. He enquired of the locals what had happened and was told a barrel of tar had fallen from a wagon and that the workers from the iron works had thrown waste slag on it to clean up the mess.

In 1902 he had patented the process and Radcliffe Road Nottingham became the first Tar Macadam road in the world when a five mile stretch was laid.

But Hooley was not a businessman and in 1903 Sir A Hickman of Birmingham (I believe) bought the patent and in 1905 re-launched the company as Tarmac the same company we know today.

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The history of tarmac roads as we know them today dates back to the year 1756 when a person by the name of John Loudon McAdam designed new roads and used broken stones that were laid in tight and symmetrical patterns and which were then covered with small sized stones that helped in creating surfaces that were very hard. McAdam soon realized that only by taking stone and gravel and crushing them to small sizes he could create the desired road surface. These roads were then known as McAdam roads and were a significant advancement in the way that roads could be constructed. The first tarmac roads were those that were laid in Paris in the year 1854.

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Just another thought, I think I have read somewhere that asphalt/bitumen blocks where used at some time to lay roads.

Tar/Pitch was also used to fix the granite blocks(cobbles) in place.

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Hi all I really like those granite setts, how in heavens name could a person make a granite stone into a cube? There are really nicely laid setts in Addison St and a nice bit near Biocity behind railings so may be safe. Lots of setts came from Charnwood and can be had in different colours depending where exactly, the stone was thrown up by a volcano and as you move around the source the colour varies. I dont know what the council does with old setts but I'm certain they sell the nice old slabs to a reclaim place in Wiltshire, just watch for the Yorkshire slabs on Uni Blvd coming back when Trams done As If

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#1 are you confusing Carlton Hill with Carlton Road?

Carlton road ends & Carlton Hill begins at the city/Gedling boundry somewhere near Brentcliffe Avenue.

I can't remember Carlton Hill ever being cobbled but Carlton Road up to Porchester Road?

I remember carlton hill was cobbled certainly up from the nags head pub Bubblewrap.

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