PeverilPeril

Wot appn'd to all them cobbles?

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Just down the road from me Dryden Street is still cobbled in interesting patterns

dryden.jpg

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Don't know how many Tivey's there were in Carlton but there's an Ian Tivey who visits this sight now again

Only just seen this about the tiveys,my maiden name was tivey

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In the Mapperley park area, a lot of the streets have been tarmacked over, but they have left the 4 or 5 rows of cobbles next to the kerbs, still visible.

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Very true taxi ray ....... and those granite kerb stones can play havoc with your alloys if you park too close! You have to be careful opening car doors when parked near the kerb too as the bottom of the door could touch the pavement.

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Very observant Lizzie, I always said you were a safe driver. LOL

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My house was on the left, just before the entry.

Interesting that you refer to it as an "Entry". My grandparents in Radford also used that word for the space between blocks of houses, and it was also used on Clifton for council houses which had that kind of space (but covered) between them.

Did anybody use the word "Alleyway" which would seem to be the obvious first choice ?

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We always called it an Entry that ran between the Terraced Houses and an Alleyway that went through from one street to the next.

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Yes Lizzie, Alleyway and Twitchel, I forgot that one. Twichel is what we called them when I was at home, I have got used to saying Alleyway here in West Mids. :biggrin:

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I tend to say 'snicket' these days for a narrow pedestrian route through a housing estate, but I seem to remember saying 'jinny' when I was little, for a path cutting over rough grassland as a shortcut between two streets. There was two I remember on Breckhill Road.... One went from the bottom of Melbury Road up the hill to Breckhill Road, nearly opposite Maitland Road; the other went over some rough grassland from Breckhill Road to ?Whernside Road. I sometimes used to use it when I was walking to school

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In our neck of the wood we have "jetty" Five bells jetty leading to the pub and Chapel jetty leading to,,,well you get the picture,and they are both sign posted

Rog

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It's the way they talk in Lincolnshire Katy!

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As the name implies, entrys were usually narrow passages between buildings, but especially to get down to the backyards from the terraces and streets. Jittys and twitchells tended to be a bit bigger than entrys. Even today I still use the terminology, always a Medders lad..

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On Andover rd Bestwood we had two 'Cul-de-sacs'...........and only posh folk like me lived 'up em'......lol.

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Anybody from "Up North" would call it a Ginnel.

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Not far north Dave,used to go out with a girl from Kirkby and she called it a Ginnel,.............we spent alot of time 'up it'....lol.

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