BeestonMick

Royal Ordnance factory - Nottingham

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Is there anybody who worked at the ROF in Kings Meadows back in the day? I was apprenticed there from 1966 - 1970 and left in 1972.

My friend's ex hubby worked there in the 60's and 70;s before leaving to join the Police Force, he was called Paul Scrivens, you may know him.............

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My Dad worked there. He served his apprenticeship from 1938 to 1942, then went into the RAF til 1946 and back to the ROF until 1986 when he retired. He was a fitter but don't know which Shop he would have been it. I'll PM his name and other lads more your age who you might have known.

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Thanks, I've had a lot of names chucked my way and not one has stood out yet, it's been a while. There'll be a few hanging around here no doubt.

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I worked there from 1972 until about 1979. Served a four year apprenticeship, ending up as a Millwright.

Quite a strict regime in some ways. As a first year apprentice, if you did something wrong, they would make you cut through a piece of a 4 inch diameter steel bar with a hacksaw as punishment

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The foreman in the apprentice shop in 1966 was a looney. He'd make you scrap whatever it was you were doing/making if it wasn't 100% to his liking. He used to scream "SCRAPPIT!!" and that was all we ever called him. He used to go nuts with us :wacko:

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We used to get our own back. We had to take it in turns to make a big pot of tea for the four instructors, and take it up to their office. Well, sometimes it became "contaminated" before it got there..

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Did you know Paul Scrivens ?............

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Couple of mates of mine worked there in the 70s Bessie Moore & Gren Turner. I got to know more about the place in the late 80s when they moved the pattern room and proof house there. We were making custom pistols at the time and used the proof house regularly.

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Think I was before you lot. Started Xmas 53 as messenger boy at 15. Then apprentice from 16 to 21 then redundant a year later.

As far as I know only one apprentice in my year stayed on and he became a foreman - Mo Edis. I called back there some years later to demonstrate a hi tech US end mill. It outperformed the usual Clarksons easily but if it went into use it would have shortened manufacturing times, at a time when they were short of work and stretching any available jobs out. So, no sale. Did OK at RR though.

Ernie Frake was apprentice shop manager when I was there. Mr Beacham (the Badger) was the superintendent.

My last job there as a skilled man was on the DeVlieg Jig mills in the North shop.

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I remember Grenville Turner, Basfordlad. A year or two older than me. If its the same one, i think he was in the TA as well.

Mo Edis was a "whitecoat" while i was there. Most who were promoted there quickly distanced themselves from their shop floor mates, but i seem to remember that Mo remained pretty much one of the lads.

As i said earlier, it always seemed a strange place to me. There were 'umpteen levels of staff grades, then assistant Managers, then Managers, then the Director. The Director always had a chauffeur, i would see him being picked up from his house in Ruddington most mornings in a Hillman car.

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I just remembered one of the apprentice shop foremen/supervisor was called Ernie Wragg, his sidekick was Scrappit.

Ernie drafted his useless son in law to the electricians department using his seniority or something, he went, more or less, straight on to the control/electronic side of things. There were three of us just out of our time gagging to get on there. Not being funny, but he had just finished an electrical installation apprenticeship at Blackburn & Starlings and not at all suited to life at the ROF. He hadn't been there long and they had him changing fluorescent tubes in the offices. He got a shock off one of the ballasts which put him in hospital for three days, pussy!! We laughed for months.

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The four instructors in the apprentice shop while i was there were- Tom Streets, Mr Williams, Joe Morrell and Fred Logan, a horrible little man who sounds like your scrappit man. Logans' nephew was in our year, and funnily enough he got a job in the tool room..

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I remember Ernie Wragg when he was on the shop floor. Wasn't e a shop steward? Tom Streets was our foreman on H&V boring North shop. He behaved a bit pompous but he was OK really. Don't know where his money came from but he had a brand new Ford Consul.

Of course the ROF was being run down and the government had a commitment to keep the established staff there. Hence the high level of management per worker. Apart from a few so called 'essential' staff the none established workers were laid off where possible. It was the rule in my time that once your apprenticeship was finished you had 12 months to find another job. No problem in those days. Offered the first 2 jobs I applied for. Turned the one at Brush down and went to Herbert Morris.

It was strange when I returned 10 or 12 years later to demonstrate milling cutters. Old apprentice mate Mo Edis was foreman on milling North shop and let me lose on a machine hogging out breach blocks. He tried to call my bluff in an attempt to break the cutter. I kept upping the cutting rate and eventually broke the machine but the cutter was OK. Saw old mates Pete Thorpe and 'Gypsy' Bob.

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The Director always had a chauffeur, i would see him being picked up from his house in Ruddington most mornings in a Hillman car.

That's a strange sign of the times - when a Hillman was considered upmarket director material. The equivalent today would be having a chauffeur to drive your Vauxhall Astra.

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It was a Hillman Hunter. Always kept in its own garage on site, yes quite modest really, the chauffeur was the extravagance. Very old fashioned, even back then. Management had seperate dining facilities, toilets etc.

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my wifes father, Mr Ken Pembleton & her mother Mavis Pembleton worked at ROF, all their working lives i believe. he was quite tall she was quite short,

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Did you know Paul Scrivens ?............

Yes blondie' i knew Paul,Ist met him playing cricket schooldays 50s,then did'nt see him again until the 90s when we were both working in Town,he lived at Beeston then and cycled the canal to work,he has a son called Chris who worked in Security.

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I remember playing Trent Bridge school at cricket. It would be 1952. They had an awsome bowler who could bowl a fast swinger. We didn't stand a chance.

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terence 12

I worked with a Ken Pembleton, or Pemberton. He worked in the Maintenance section. We called him Pembo. Remember him quite well if it was him. Guessing he would be in his nineties now.

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