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#100

 

I too have a number of friends who are ex Manning but older than I am. They all hated it.

 

As to the sports department, I think those two were there for decades. Let's face it, who else would want them?

 

Most of my contemporaries from Berridge Road Primary went to Peveril...and loved it! We did something wrong somewhere didn't we? We turned up for school on 11 plus day! :blink:

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As I have said before, good teachers are born not made , and I see no need whatsoever for violence to achieve discipline .... I like fly , was constantly smacked at school by poor teachers not sa

#85 Catfan, you reminded me of a really shy lad in my class many years ago. He didn`t have PE kit so I got him a lovely kit from the spares cupboard and quietly gave it to him. However, on PE day he w

The dreaded Manning School, class of 1974. It's most severe critic is on the back row, far left.

Jill, I passed my 11+ from Berridge Juniors, and although I detested nearly every day at FFGS, I wouldn't have missed a Grammar School education for the world. I appreciate I blew all my O levels, but as well as knowledge, I gained ethics and a reasonable outlook that has stayed with me all my life. 

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#102

 

I quite agree FLY2. It was the kind of education that I don't believe could be had now outside the private sector if only, for one thing, no disruptive pupils were allowed to remain in the school. We did have some but they soon disappeared.

 

The discipline was strict but most of us had been brought up pretty strictly anyway. I think that kind of discipline would not be tolerated today but...and I've said it many times...self discipline cannot be acquired without discipline first being imposed upon a person and without self discipline, no one will ever achieve anything. By the word 'discipline' incidentally, I do not mean beating, caning or strapping children which, if their parents have done a reasonable job since birth, should not be necessary anyway. Feel free to disagree folks, that's just my opinion.

 

I think, in any event, if you have an enquiring mind, opportunities for education are available throughout life now and formal schooling is only a basis for ongoing learning and acquisition of knowledge.

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I agree entirely regarding discipline. I had a good upbringing and cherished every moment of it. However, I did receive the strap and cane at FFGS, but mainly it was deserved. However, I soon acquired a rebellious streak by questioning everything which has made  me the person I am today. Dogged, resilient, resolute, loyal, kind, caring and considerate. (Of course some on here may disagree)

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As I have said before, good teachers are born not made , and I see no need whatsoever for violence to achieve discipline ....

I like fly , was constantly smacked at school by poor teachers not satisfying my enquiring mind .

This led to me becoming rebellious and non conformist in my teenage years......

I then went into education, listening to the needs of my pupils and worked some of the most deprived schools in England without any disrespect or disruption....

So in a way the grammar system I was educated under gave me the courage to give my children and my pupils more self worth and conformist values .....

 

 

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#104

 

So far as I recall, there was no physical punishment at Manning, it was more along the lines of psychological warfare! Misdemeanors resulted in the miscreant being directed to stand under the Dome in the admin block, where the Head and her Deputy each had a study and staff members passed by on their way to and from the staff room. I'm told by some of my older friends who attended Manning that this had always been the practice and even involved the hanging of a notice round the miscreant's neck, stating their 'crime'.

 

Fear of such a fate was sufficient to deter most of us!

 

Otherwise, offenders were obliged to stand on the stage during assembly whilst their sins were read out to the entire school. Of course, this would never be permitted now! The parents would sue!

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#105

 

I recall my first day at teacher training college when I had the temerity to state that I thought good teachers were born and not made. I was verbally attacked by all 4 female tutors for being wrong in the extreme! I would, they assured me, realise the error of that statement by the end of my time there.

 

Having been observed and supervised on teaching practice by all four of them and having also observed them with children, I was by the end of the course able to say that in my opinion they had become trainers of teachers because they were no good at doing the job itself. That went down well but my fellow PGCE students and I had all reached the same conclusion.

 

To quote my father "Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach!"

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Gosh that brings back memories Jill .....teaching practice !!!!!!

the lecturers assigned to watching you perform miracles in the classroom ( one of mine had 52 pupils in )  were failed teachers who were in no way equipped to help you through those stressful weeks .

My first practice was a comprehensive in Bury town centre, second one  a primary school in 

pendlebury Lancs and the third Moss side in Manchester .......

 

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Some salubrious establishments there hippo. Crikey ! 

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9 minutes ago, FLY2 said:

Some salubrious establishments there hippo. Crikey ! 

 

There's nowt wrong with Bury. I guess that hippo taught at Derby High or Wellington, or possibly Bury Church?

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Happy memories of Wellington school, very traditional building and lovely children, not so sure about the staff.....some very old school and the head was a mr Barrett ......

Was living south Manchester at the time, so it was bus and train ( no trams back then )

 

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VJ, can you make your trip down Memory Lane coincide with our next meeting. PM me for details.

 

The school was still standing, complete, last June, when I drove by it.

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Yes school still standing 5 hours ago............Bulwell lane will have changed a bit though,ie no entry from Pear Tree end and lots of new housing.

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  • 3 months later...

Worrabout when you forgot your P.E. kit you had to do it in your underpants? I told everyone the skid mark up the back was just a birthmark that had rubbed off?

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#118

 

If you forgot your PE kit at the Manning, you were forced to clean out the sports equipment room next to the gym. It involved cleaning the hockey sticks, rubbing dubbin into netballs, etc! Oddly enough, I had a dream the other night in which I was back at the Manning and I couldn't find my PE kit. I was arguing with old Pickle Face and told her she had no right to keep me there because I was nearly 60 and educated to post graduate level! Then I woke up in a cold sweat. :angry:

 

Psychological damage. I reckon I could sue!

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  • 6 months later...
  • 3 weeks later...

I was at Brincliffe, at the other side of the Forest. I left in 1960 but I believe that Brincliffe flitted across the Forest when it had to close. So if I'd been younger I would have joined you, swapping the bottle green for the scarlet.

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Jill you are easily recognisable,  a sign of good genes.  Your school uniform shirt much nicer than mine, button up to the neck, tie had to have right size knot or detention.   I also notice you were allowed a choice of footwear, same shoes in winter same sandals in summer.  Look at students of today a different world.

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I do like that photograph you girls look as if you have 'sized' as per the military. A drill carried out so as to ensure tallest in the middle running down in size either side.

 

Which according to our Jill would just about suit the Manning ethos.

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