Black holes & quantum physics.


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I am old, of Irish heritage and clarity of mind and have the benefit of pre comprehensive education with no college follow up, a long career in scrapyards and jobs that required little input which brought much thinking time so I can assure you all, 1 there is no such thing as time, 2 the gravity we experience is the opposite of what is really operating, 3 the Universe is truly infinitely large. This is difficult to comprehend even for the best scientific mind but anyone may be able to glimpse the truth. If you can believe in the infinitely large then you must accept that things can be infinitely small. I have not noticed any great scientist admit this. Stop this reading of The New Scientist and National Geographic and get happy as only Red Indians and cats know how. I wish you all many summers.

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Over the usual Sunday afternoon pint with my physicist and scientific pals it was decided that I did have a purpose in life after all. If we were shipwrecked and in a lifeboat with no means of navigat

I remember when I was only nine or ten, sitting in a classroom looking out of the window and wondering - for the first time - whether I was really there or was all my life a dream, and how could I kno

Schroedinger holds no mystery in this household. If there's a box, there's always a cat in it. That's a probability of 1. When I receive a wine delivery, there are usually 2 boxes...one inside the oth

#26

Well, that's one view. I believe time exists and it runs out. When we can discover how to resurrect the dead, I might think differently. I think many can understand the concept of infinity and the opposite, it's not too difficult. I do not get your meaning concerning gravity.

The greatest scientific advances have been achieved through the absolute dedication of those who believed, often against ridicule, that they were right. Sometimes luck played a part, but those scientists responsible for ground-breaking changes to civilisation did not get there with a laissez faire approach. Nice to be a Red Indian or a cat and just let world flow by though.

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A close friend had his contribution to the LHC recognised a few months ago. His name kept cropping up in the papers to do with Super conducting magnets. He worked on these as a physicist in South Africa and his design made it possible for the units to be serviced. My friend has no egotistic or mercenary traits, so his work went unsung for over 2 decades. Last month he was recognised at last and invited to visit the LHC all expenses paid and given VIP treatment. That is all he wanted.and he didn't even ask for that!

He does my brain in on a weekly basis trying to put particle theory into simple terms. Fortunately he is a very humorous scouser with many redeeming qualities.

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There were some superconductors on Corpo buses years ago (Hazel Nutt was one) but they are all gone now.

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# 31.

Sounds like an interesting bloke. I'm fascinated by superconductors & super-fluids & other quantum weirdness. My Wife thinks I'm potty..

She could have a point Colly,

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Steve, there's a dark matter lab at CPL's Boulby mine, the government forked the cost out to mine the chamber 3/4 mile below the surface. All the scientists come under the Mine Managers jurisdiction with regards to safety and rules. If you go to CPL's website, they have photos of the U/G lab.

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Reading a book called 'Gravity's Engines' all about black holes & their place in the cosmos. I'm reading it in bed but then I can't get to sleep as I'm thinking about black holes, good read though..

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I watched an interesting program on black holes last night. (Horizon BBC 4) It touched on black holes being both relativistic & quantum physical at the same time, & the equations basically broke physics. They got multiple infinities in their answers which of course = nonsense. So as relativity & quantum physics do not seem to talk to each other then both theories must be incomplete or plain wrong. The scientists admit that this buggers things up big time. I still love black holes though. :)

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I watched an interesting program on black holes last night. (Horizon BBC 4) It touched on black holes being both relativistic & quantum physical at the same time, & the equations basically broke physics. They got multiple infinities in their answers which of course = nonsense. So as relativity & quantum physics do not seem to talk to each other then both theories must be incomplete or plain wrong. The scientists admit that this buggers things up big time. I still love black holes though. :)

I ran this through one of those automatic translation programmes and my computer blew up.

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# 40 Benjamin,

I'm sort of OK. My wife's a line dance instructor & I'm a pupil in her class: At tonight's class every time I made a mistake (I make a lot of mistake's) she said over the mike "he's got black holes going round in his head!" I set up the audio gear for her class, part way through a song the laptop conked out = silence: I'd forgotten to plug the laptop into the mains & the battery had gone flat, there was lots of shouting & fuss & black holes on my brain were blamed..

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Just finished a book about Strangeness- also covered was an explantion on charm and quark- an xmas pressie from my middle child!! - i must say from a shovel whielding sapper such as me-- particles and other matters i now understand.

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# 43 Ian,

Sounds an interesting book, I'll keep a look out for it at the library .... It speculates in the black hole book that the singularity of a black hole is smaller than a quark, now that is mega small..

It explained in the black hole book & on the program that 'normal' black holes are formed when a star more than 3 times the mass of the sun goes supernova, which I sort of understand. However the supermassive black holes at the centre of most galaxies are millions to billions of times the mass of the sun. Must admit I do not understand how they formed. I wonder if they formed straight from a massive gas cloud bypassing the star phase & went straight to a supermassive black hole? I think those cleverer than me will have to work that out..

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#39 I watched the same program colly. Fascinating stuff. There must have been billions spent and millions of man/computer hours of calculations done, only to result in a question mark!

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I've finished reading my book on 'Gravity's Engines' it was a very interesting read. (well it was to me :) ) It explains how gravity is the dominant force in the universe, even though it's the weakest by several orders of magnitude. One thing it admits it can't explain is Dark Matter & Dark Energy, the reason being no one has the slightest clue what they are. The jury isn't just out, the jury doesn't even exist. I'm thinking there is a lot more to be discovered out there in the the scientific world, a few surprises, & maybe even something we've never even imagined or thought of..

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