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Here's the other one

 

Heckington2012_(19).jpg

 

Rog

 

 

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I like the notice, price new £2500. Value now.....   a lot!

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I just looked at how much £2500in 1920 would be in 2018 - £108000. I wonder which modern say cars are tomorrows valuable antiques?

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The problem with modern cars is their electronic and mechanical sophistication which, after about ten years, becomes obsolete. The average garage mechanic only knows how to plug in the obd reader and adjust or replace the component from the readout that he gets. Older cars had simple mechanical and electrical systems which were relativly easy both to diagnose and repair. I’m sure a few modern classics will survive because rust is not an issue but will parts be available or easy to fabricate? A recent problem with my modern car, under warranty, took two weeks and three trips on a recovery vehicle for them to sort out even though I told the dealership what was wrong. Basic common sense would have diagnosed the fault. Because you’re old and grey they think you’re stupid!

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4 minutes ago, philmayfield said:

Basic common sense would have diagnosed the fault.

 

Correct Phil but,Basic common sense is not all that common these days

 

Rog

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This is the old Petter A1 petrol engine I am working on for someone in the village, it's not run for many years and as you can see it's in a bit of a state, there was no compression in the engine and no spark from the magneto, I removed the spark plug and poured some petrol and oil mixture down the spark plug hole,turned the engine over a few times using the starting handle to get the mixture around the piston rings and valves, next I put a scratch mark on the magneto body where it joins the engine and a scratch mark on the engine case to line up with the magneto so when I come to put the magneto back on the engine it will go in the same place as it was removed, the points in the magneto were corroded together and needed prising apart, I did this and cleaned them up using fine  wet and dry abrasive paper, next was to remove the cover on the top of the magneto revealing the copper windings,these were covered in oil and dust so needed a good clean  and wipe down using WD 40 after wiping them dry with a clean cloth I replace the whole lot back on the engine making sure to line up the two scratch lines, turned the engine over using the starting handle and there was a good spark from the HT lead. The owner of the engine wasn't avialable the following week as he was on holiday so that gave time for the petrol/oil mixture in the cyclinder and valves to work it's way in and hopefully free off the piston rings and stuck valves,

 

Petter_A1_(1).jpg

 

on my next visit I will see if things have freed off ready for the next stage of restoration

 

Rog

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6 hours ago, Socram said:

Can't for the life of me get the photo to show up here!  

 

Clicking on the link takes me to the photo ok.  It's a link to a New Zealand-based motorsport site, which obviously makes sense, seeing where you are.

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