Recommended Posts

  • Replies 422
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

one for the vintage vehicle fans   Rog

Old Petter engine coming along fine good clean off and top half stripdown and valves ground in,old carbon deposits cleqaned from cyclinder head and piston crown.all filters changed as

Posted Images

You have obviously done a great job there Rog..................what is it..???..........lol.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Let me explain Ben. Rog finds old, down at heel engines, rescues them, treats them with loving kindness, lavishes care, attention and love on them. In return, they chug away happily, gleam like the sun, purr in a sultry manner....and they don't cut his suits to shreds with a pair of scissors.

 

There's a lesson there....somewhere.  ;)

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

I know some on here like old motors so this may be of interest. It’s on the best channel on tv, Talking Pictures, today at 11.05am and as a bonus it’s in Notts.

 

11:05 GLIMPSES: WHIT MONDAY MOTOR RACING MEETING: Late 1950s Classic Car Race meeting at Gamston airfield in Nottinghamshire. A must see for all classic car enthusiasts!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Another program on Talking Pictures today is Glimpses: Motor Salesmanship in the 1930s  and includes an interesting visit to The Hillman & Humber Works in Coventry, Dunlop Works in Birmingham, Vauxhall in Luton and the Austin works in Longbridge.

Link to post
Share on other sites

No plans to show it PP, lovely little engine,starts after a couple of swings and runs a treat, I have a pressure washer that can be fitted to it as well,that is powerful, I'm not sure of the horsepower on the engine,  I'll nip out and check in a bit

 

Rog

 

Just checked it, 7.5 HP

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a couple of small petrol engines in a shed,one is a Suffolk Engine Foundary the other is from an old grass mower, about the same size might need a bit of work but they was running last year on a bench,if they are any good to you

 

Rog

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Think I'm going to have to pay you a visit Rog. We have a lot in common. I'll bring you a drop of cidre.

Thanks for offering a chance at the engines, although they may be too 'revvy' and lack torque for driving a scratter. 

Looks like my picture taking and posting devices may be improved at Christmas :biggrin: Postings about tools and projects arn't the same without pictures. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

PF - I'm currently bidding on a 1 1/2 hp Bamford. It looks complete so worth a punt. I live fairly close to Uttoxeter where they were made in the 40's and 50's, so there is a bit of local knowledge hereabouts.

Talking about Bamfords - JCB the world class company started out in Uttoxeter. They have a superb apprenticeship scheme and school. Their bus stops at the end of our road every morning taking workers and apprentices to Rocester.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have drove passed their World parts center many times on my way to the potteries, even worked on JCB plant, not as big as CAT,Volvo,Bell equipment etc but not bad machines, certainly good for the economy in that part of the country, Good luck with the Bamford sounds just what you need for your project

 

Rog

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember seeing her awarded the OBE on tv about ten years ago. Instead of resting on her laurels by being married to a multi billionaire, she has devoted her time to various charities, and has introduced ethical methods of farming and animal welfare on the many family farming businesses. An attractive woman in her day too.

In response  to Lizzie's statement, yes, he did do well !

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that the ford 100e was the first motor you could do almost everything from underneath  Prior to that you had to take all the seats out carpets and floor to get the gear box out sidevalves were a nightmare Ford had non adjustable tappets you had to grind the valve stem to alter the gap They gave 11 to 13 for the gap i always set them at 10 if you didnt you got all the inlet and exhaust manifold back on only to hear tap tap when you struck it up First job was decoke unheard of today But there where no works times then you had a job and whenever you finished you went to the foreman for another  we called M G multiple gremlins I had a great tool for ford valves it was a jig you sat the valve in first you took the gap you had then set the tool to that then all you had to do was grind the valve until you got the correct gap in the tool so you didnt have to keep taking the valve out the engine  because fords had split valve guides  there was a mushroom shaped tool to knock the guide out no collets just a figure of eight shape valve spring holder which would come down on any unwary finger  Meeowed

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah the 100E, side valve,thermo-syphon cooling system and vacuum operated wipers,the slower you went the slower the wipers operated, remember altering the voltage regulator for winter/dark nights running?

 

Rog

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, plantfit said:

Ah the 100E, side valve,thermo-syphon cooling system and vacuum operated wipers,the slower you went the slower the wipers operated, remember altering the voltage regulator for winter/dark nights running?

 

And don't forget the three-speed gearbox. Seem to remember that there was no petrol gauge anall.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember that the handbook for the Anglia 100E stated that the performance was such as could have been expected of sports cars a few years earlier! Always wondered what sort of sports car could have been as sluggish as that. Mind you, Dad was not renowned as being a swift driver, so driving up Wilford Hill in a heavy downpour really caused visibility problems with the wipers struggling to move.

Remember the reg. number TLW 856

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if anybody can think of why Sunbeam (and possibly other car manufacturers) used a shallow hemispherical nut on their shackle pins before the first world war ? Why not use hexagonal nuts?

5a23b4d78f5f1_HemisphericalNut-800.jpg.236c7c4efbca85be18dcb2b301be5949.jpg

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...