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Re Troggs' mention of Harry Hyman being our areas executive council member , I went to a union meeting one night, in Centrals' bar, there was a long debate about pay and conditions chaired by Harry. Eventually, someone ( can't remember who) called a vote of no confidence in the executive council. It carried almost unanimous. Harry looked as though he'd just been given the death sentence. 

The meeting petered out after that. I felt quite sorry for him.

 

I do remember his car, a beautiful  MG (?) 1100 in green and cream .

 

Love the super-sized helmet transfer Trogg, would love to stick one on my ex Central  fogrider Triumph twin.

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I broke an officers fog lamp in the late 60's ..the type with the blue dome in the middle.

I went around the corner to Central..and owned up..it was a black MG Roadster..i got a good telling off..and my pocket money was stopped for weeks until the lamp was paid for.

Ouch!

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Off topic again,sorry, this is a mobile feed hopper used at the East Leake quarry, big Cimmins engine to move the thing on it's tracks along the conveyor then when it was in place plug in to the 440v electric supply to operate the live head and feed conveyor, you wouldn't believe the amount of work I had to do on that thing to maintain it in working condition, changing screen mesh every other week, free off the tracks every time it had to be moved, replace hydraulic hoses both rubber and steel the list was endless, still it kept me busy at a nice quarry to work at, really enjoyed Rast Leake quarry, it is pictured here with the quarry manager

 

Sos&Hassels_machine.jpg

 

Rog

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Yours truly giving a lifting equipment and signalling demonstration at Melton Ross quarry North Lincolnshire

 

6.jpg

 

Rog

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Of course not all the machines I had to repair and maintain were nice clean jobs, some were a pain in the you know where like this one a Powerscreen Chieftain,mobile screen and conveyor system, put in the raw material,in this case recycled road planings, into the feed hopper, the planings go up the main conveyor onto a live head (shaking screen) where its sorted into different sizes, the correct size materials go up the correct conveyor and the waste or oversize is ejected to the waste pile

DSCF4745.jpg

Dirty job but enjoyable when you get it running, makes a hell of a noise and everything on it is trying to go into self destruct by shaking itself to bits,

Perkins engine and hydraulically operated parts

 

Rog

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DSCF4741.jpg

 

11 tons of Kue Ken Rockeater jaw crusher, a real finger trapper if ever there was one, evrything on this crusher was very heavy, the jaws needed two men to lift them and they were only about 18 inches by 14 inches by 2 inches thick, probably made from Manganese steel, this thing could crush 2 inch flint rocks down to dust, you don't want to get your fingers anywhere near that when it was running, once again another machine that shook the ground and made one hell of a noise when it was crushing

 

Rog

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Of course it wasn't all hard graft,sometimes you got to meet some really nice people like this rep at a construction equipment show in Derbyshire for Duo Africa

 

DSCF4275.jpg

 

I'm the one on the right

 

Rog

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Mmmm, big machine porn......

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Yer' right Rog..i drove a Volvo BM for Spaights...the area rep often organised meals/ feedback boozeups.Tick a few sheets and hit the Grey Goose!

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And we moan about trivial things, can't imagine what the people were going through in them days, very brave men,

 

Rog

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Ian's mention of Volvo dumpers reminded me of some work I did on one at Halkyn quarry Flintshire North Wales, this is a picture of a Volvo A40 (40 ton) articulated dump truck being loaded by a CAT 345C (45 ton) hydraulic excavator

 

Halkyn_day_(4).jpg

 

Nothing to do with Nottingham or fires I know but some might find it interesting

 

Rog

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Seeing those bald tyres reminded me of a time I was a rep for Marsham tyres. A big dump truck on the Ratcliffe power station site needed a new tyre but there were none locally. I arranged for one to be delivered direct from Goodyear in Wolverhampton and had a couple fitters on site. Those tyres are, or were, ballasted with rock salt and water. All good and one very happy customer - until someone did a screw turn in a D8 and put point of the blade straight into the sidewall of the new tyre covering everyone in water and salt! Learned some new words that day...

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Thankfully they are no longer ballasted these days Brew, very expensive though,about four grand a piece,

 

Rigid dump truck tyre

DSCF3247.jpg

 

External armoured tyres for work in hard rock quarries

DSCF3243.jpg

 

Rog

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7 minutes ago, plantfit said:

very expensive though,about four grand a piece,

I know, back then I seem to remember they were about £1000, my commission for that month was great. No one in the company had ever sold two in a month never mind two in a week!

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We used to send the worn ones away to be re moulded and kept at the tyre companies site until needed, you can't put a re mould or new tyre alongside a part worn one on the hydraulically driven vehicles (loaders,dumpers etc) because of the  drives binding up so it's very rare to fit just one tyre, as you probably know the pressure in them surprises a lot of people, normal tyre pressure of the dump trucks was about 40 psi, I've still got my CAT tyre pressure gauge,perhaps a collectors item now

 

Rog

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Yours truly 70 feet up in a MEWP (mobile elevated work platform) just retrieved some redundant pipework from the top of the plant

 

Roger_in_Cherry_picker.jpg

 

I was operating the boom from the "basket" if it fails when you are up there a switch can be operated from the main machine on the ground taking control away from the basket and letting the thing be operated from there by the man on the ground, great view over Lincolnshire from up there, this was at Woodhall Spa and I could clearly see Boston hospital 19 miles away to the east and Lincoln cathedral over 20 miles away to the north west

 

Rog

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We had 60 footers for working on the M1 lighting in the mid 80's. Didn't use full harnesses though we had belts which were about as much use as tits on a boar, If you fell out it meant you would be dangling upside down over the fast lane of the motorway.

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Hmm true, glad I never tried it though.

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Two types of lanyard that is fastened to the harness, a fall arrest lanyard is a self retracting lanyard that when in use will slowly release more lanyard if you fall from height, little or no shock loading,these have to be worn when working at any height,

The other type is called a rescue lanyard, these are a fixed length lanyard but are fastened to the harness in the same way as the fall arrest, wear this type for working in confined spaces where, in the event of something happening to the wearer ie: collasped, taken ill or unable to escape by own means.the harness has to be adjusted to the wearer,if it's too loose and the wearer falls certain body parts could be become trapped in the straps which don't bear thinking about (I have seen actual photo's of that) if the harness is too tight then it becomes uncomfortable and the wearer won't be able to carry out the task safely

In order to wear any of this equipment safely you need to be trained by specialist companies and need to take refresher training every three or five years, I did my rescue training etc at the Mines Rescue Center in Mansfield

 

Rog

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I can recall a fire, after moving from Hucknall to Anderby (not Anderby creek) but the village. The properties all have names there are no number's. In November 2000 master had a heart attack, he had been out of hospital for about a week and on this night the smoke alarm went off, now we thought it might need a new battery, so got out of bed to check looked into the kitchen and there were 6ft flames coming out of the dishwasher (put on in night economy seven) master was right behind me, what should we do he asked Phone the b----- fire bridge I said so 999  we did, by this time my friend Julie next door was awake, so leaving the master for her to look after, I went to find a touch. So there I was in the middle of the road about 3 00am waiting to flag the fire tuck down. Well size 15 boots went though the whole bungalow opening all the doors and windows, which was good of them, but the new hall and lounge carpet were cover in soot and my new sofa's were full of smoke. The chap came next day from the insurance, as soon as he new master had been in hospital, he told us to book in a hotel straight away as there would be a lot of work needed to get our place back to our it was. It cost the Insurance people £25000 to get our place back to normal. Not saying who the insurance people were  but the one with the red telephone ring's a bell.

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Ian 123 your not going to believe  this

just before master had his heart attack, on bonfire night my son and his wife were at a friends house and some one threw a firework close to the garage where there was a can of petrol and my son tried to kick the can out of the way what he did not know was that the top had not been put back on,  he was in flames in no time at all  as it happens his wife got the hosepipe and kept putting water on him also asking the people that were there to get wet towels, she saved his life. Its not nice getting a phone call about three in the morning and having to come back to Nottm  not knowing what to expect but  he is now back his normal self. PHEW!!!

Then we had the fire,  I don't want to go on but next in January the phone went at 6 30, it was my other son telling me that his wife had to go into hospital for an opp so cancer cells could be removed, thank fully she is still ok after her last check  up, then to top it all up my father passed away in the Feb. Now all this was in 2000/2001 now thank goodness we are back to normal. After all this we returned back to Nottingham.

 

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