banjo48

Nottm Accents and Recognition Around the World

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#23 - nonnaB - I remember going to Goose Fair with my mum and dad in the late 50s, where we happened to meet an old work colleague of my mum, with her husband. In the course of conversation dad mentioned that he had been in India during the war. The woman's husband said, "Really - did you know a chap called so-and-so...?" (Can't remember the name, but it wasn't Smith.) The woman turned to him and said "Don't be daft Frank, think of how many thousands of British soldiers there were in India..."

And then dad replied, "Well, it's a funny thing - but - actually, I did know him..."

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I like that Stephen. It really is a small world even though its big.

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My sister in law is German and when she's on the phone she will come out with her Nottingham accent, of course she has learnt every thing from my bother. It is strange to hear her say tor-rar in Germany English, and of course when she calls you love, but I dare not tell her as she try's so hard with her English.

Looking at my Nottingham accent 's spelling not sure if it's spelt right

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What's a gog? Maybe I shouldnt ask. :unsure:

The only thing in South Wales less popular than the English.

It's short for "Gogledd" which means "northerner" in Welsh and refers to anyone who comes from north of Powys.

If I ever come across a Plaid Cymru supporter who's rabbiting on about kicking all the sais (English) out, I just remind him that if they do they'll just go back to hating each other; which they do, with a vengeance!

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I don’t have an accent. Never have had an accent. I talk proper, it’s other people who have accents.

 

In most of my, not inconsiderable, years I’ve thought that my way of speaking had remained pretty much the same. I could certainly tell the Nottingham accent whenever I left ‘Ucknall to visit the city. I quite speedily learnt to distinguish the nuances of intonation in different parts of ’Ucknall and certainly Boo-ull and Annslee. I went to college in Nottingham and it was noticed there that the way I spoke was different to the other students. I still thought that it was they who had the accent and my diction was pure.

 

After six years of daily commuting to Nottingham, I moved there to live full time. I must have picked up a Nottingham “twang” as every time I returned to ‘Ucknall some wag would remark on the way I spoke. Even so, as far as I was concerned, I still spoke the way I always had done.

 

Some years later, I made the move to the South of England. First to Kent and then to Surrey/Sussex. I immediately thought that the locals spoke with a very posh accent (sticking “r” into words where “r” has no right to be – barth, larff etc) and they immediately identified me as being a Northerner – they don’t differentiate between the Midlands (with Nottingham) - and the North.

 

Six years in the South of England and it was time for me to move on again. I thought, before I left, that I would pay a visit to the old friends I had left behind in the Midlands (‘Ucknall, Nottingham and Leicester). That trip was something of a disaster. Several, who I thought of as friends, seemed remote, almost like strangers. The thing I noticed most was that they all had very strong Nottingham(ish) accents. How could that be? As far as I knew, my diction was the same as it had always been – the same as theirs. Without exception, all my old friends told me I had gone posh and chucked my roots away.

 

I was now, in effect, stateless. My homeland of the Midlands told me I had gone Southern and dead posh and the Southerners still thought of me as a Northerner (and concomitantly dead common).

 

It wasn’t with a heavy heart that I left England. I was depressed, yes, but that was in consideration of how my younger years seemed so fleeting and wasted.

 

The start of my living in France was pretty uneventful (not so later on but that’s not the point of this thread).

 

I make a UK trip every year or so (I still retain a house there) and during my recent visit over Christmas, I was frequently asked if I was French because of my accent. I tried to explain I don’t have an accent. The way I talk now is the way I’ve always talked – proper!

 

As a rider to the above, the locals here and my staff as just beginning to accept me as being an honorary Frenchman.

 

The final bit here is that I go down to the resorts a fair amount and it’s always interesting to eavesdrop on the jabbering of the tourists. Quite often I can be similarly be jabbering away in the local lingo and then suddenly interject their conversation with some English. More than once I have had the response “Ar yo’ frum Nottin-ghum?”

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I guess we acclimatize to wherever we are.  I heard of an Irishman who moved to New York.  His wife couldn't join him until a year later.  When she arrived she said to him, "Don't these people talk funny?  To which he replied, "eye, tha do, but their getting better.  You should have heard 'em when I first got here!"

 

How does it work for immigration requirements into France?  You mentioned you have a house in the UK.  When I moved to the US from Canada I was told that I had to decide my place of residence.  I could only live in the U S for six months and I would have to leave unless I applied for permanent residence.  You could come back but you had to leave every six months.  So I just applied for a green card.  Made things a bit simpler.  I'd sold my house in Canada so apart from visiting my kids I wasn't spending much time there.

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The UK being in the EU makes a lot of difference in regard to residency. Leaving the EU also could make a difference to my national status - in which case I will take up French citizenship. I will still be able to own my English property but not live there more than a short time each year and I'm not sure what that is. I don't think the French authorities know yet, it depends on what Mrs May and her juddering government decide will happen to French nationals living in the UK.

 

My big problem currently is a battle with the UK tax people. I get most of my income in the form of US dollars which is paid into UK offshore accounts in the Isle of  Man. The HMRC want to tax me on my $ income at the full UK rate even though those accounts are used as a passing convenience and the UK is not legitimately losing anything. The loss to me would be quite substantial. I admit this is a rather silly arrangement but when it was made many years ago, I didn't intend taking up permanent residence here.

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When I moved from Bestwood Village to Kirkby I noticed the accent was different & it was only a 7 miles move. When I moved from the Meadows to Bestwood Village I also noticed the accent change & I was only 14. Biggest change was when I was a kid & we moved from Meadows to Chester-le-Street, I couldn't tell a word they said when I first started school up there. Then when we moved back to the Meadows I had a thick Durham accent that took me years to lose... 

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I think to some extent this has changed now but when I was younger my Radford accent was slightly different to say a Bulwell accent. They seemed very territorial.  My wife's uncle born 1900 lived and died in Hyson Green had a lovely accent. I can hear him now when enquiring, "aye up Uncle John, how are yo" his reply  'I'm all rete".

I certainly noticed a marked difference in the mid 1970's when I went to live and work in Hucknall where there was a distinct difference. I still ask "what's foh snap" picked up from Hucknall.

Could have been influenced by miners from Newcastle and other parts of the country coming to wok at pit. Even today My grandsons live in Eastwood so I'm over there quite often and where as I say me-duck they will ask in a shop what do you want my duck. Always my duck.

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Great observation Lets....

Living in the very centre of town..no accent..walk up as far as Peas Hill Rd.

Very broad...Snenno was also different.

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On one of the Costas years ago, a group of us passed two Brit guys selling timeshares. One of them shouted to me 'You from Ilkeston ?'

I yelled back 'Bugger off..... Basford ' .  They laughed uncontrollably.

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Although I am originally from Yorkshire and believe that I have not lost my Yorkshire accent, I was talking to someone at work a few months ago and he asked me where in the East Midlands I was from. He guessed that it was probably Nottingham. I told him that I lived in Nottingham for 5 years and then Leicester for another 5 years. Incidentally I have a couple of friends where I now live in Bristol and I picked up their Leicester accent as soon as they spoke.

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At the first Parents Evening at Grammar School my English teacher asked if I’d had elocution lessons, which I hadn’t (parents couldn’t afford such things but they were beaming with pride that they’d taught their little girl to talk ‘proper’)

When I got married at 25 (almost on the shelf in those days) I moved down south. Oxfordshire, Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire then Hertfordshire.  Our sons were born down there in the Home Counties and they have southern accents but I never changed my accent. It just seemed false to say ‘barth’, ‘parth’ etc.  I remained ME.  My husband is a Sussex boy originally, he still talks ‘posh’  as a few Nottingham friends have commented over the years.  Does it really matter?   All that’s important is that we can converse and communicate with anyone at all levels of society  and I feel I am able to do that.    I don’t like getting into arguments and disputes and would really rather observe and work people out from a distance but if something bothers me enough I’ll give ‘em some Nottingham speak.  

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Going on my husband's works Christmas party which was at Leeds we stayed with one of his work friends, oh! said Pat the mans wife you do speak well, I wish I had a Nottingham accent you really do sound nice when you talk. Now I did not know weather to believe her as coming from St Ann's I used to think that I used to speak lots of Nottingham slang  like Lizzie M  I had not had any elocution lessons.

Growing Up in St Ann's always had a bit of a bad reputation  about it (it was a lot to do with what papers and councils said + TV) people from

St Ann's  were all one big family I can now say that I'm proud to have lived and been brought up there.

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Beat this one.

We are having dinner in an up market hotel in  Tropical north Queensland, (Port Douglas) being served by the waiter who I guessed was from the Midlands. 

I asked where he was from & he said "England"  so I assume he thought I was Australian.

I told him that I knew which Country but where exactly in England. He said "Guess" so I said either Nottingham or Leicester.

He couldn"t believe it & said that he was from Nottingham. Next question; Where in Nottingham?  He said "St Ann's" So I said" what Street."  He told me he was from St Ann'swell Road which I'm not really familiar with but joking I said "which Number!"  By now he's so shocked that he sits down!  Then I informed him that I was originally from Bilborough  which was even more amazing as he went to Bilborough College. The crowd around the table could not believe this conversation & that I could pick an accent from the other side of the world.

We talked about the Palais & the Loccarno which of course he did not know on account of his age but said that his Mother had talked about those places. So I said "just think...I may have known your Mother!"

My wife (smart arse) them pipped up "No! No!  You might have known his grandmother!"   Very funny my wife!

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