mick2me

Radford Map (1920)

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I also went to Bentink Rd The church was St Michaels and all Angels. I was a choir boy there. Rev Cannon Leaper lived in a large house opposite the Forest gates Mt Hooton Rd.

I used to attend Sunday school there in the 1950s and was to become a choir boy but we moved to Clifton, on line dates it from 1889 to 1975 which is when I assume it was pulled down

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Back to the Radford Folly map...New Street is shown below the Folly. I remember this from 1946/51. It was more of a track then. The area of land between New St and the folly was scrub land borderd by a stone wall. A small steam (not the Leen) ran up against the wall, where I used to play and fish for minnows and newts. My granddad told me that the stream was all that remained of a boating lake. I vaguely remember a small ruin on the Folly side of the scrub land.

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Judging by the picture of the Folly lake, it was bigger than the area behind St Peters and could have well extended to New Rd. The small ruin that I mentioned was just about where something is marked on the map. Granddad may have been right.

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It's a funny old map. The draughtsman obviously worked on a large sheet and could not reach across to write street name the same way up.

I was looking for my old school on street view - the Windley on Forest Rd and noticed that it is no longer a school and also that the area behind the school has completely changed. The map shows Waterloo Prom behind the school but no sign of it now. Continuing across Southey St to join Mount Hooton Rd there is a bit of Waterloo Crescent leading to the old Forest gates, but it all looks so different.

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I was born and grew up just off Churchfield Lane. Next door to me was an old chap, Mr Mayfield who had worked at Players. I remember him saying he'd moved in to his house when it was new and he used to cross Churchfield Lane and there was nowt but fields towards Aspley for miles. I notice on Cliff Ton's map above that Hartly Road was then Churchville. It's interesting that there is a footpath marked running South off Churchville opposite StPeters Church. There is still today a little twitchel running between the houses here. Never realised it was the remnants of a footpath. I used to walk down it everyday when my mum took me to the Croft nursery.

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A wider, better map of the area showing more of the features mentioned by letsavagoo.

I know the area because my grandparents lived at Grimston Road which hadn't been built yet (approx where the words "Grand Hotel" are). I don't remember seeing the colliery but I think it was still working in my younger days; I like the idea of a disused windmill in the allotments over the railway line, in the area of "nowt but fields towards Aspley for miles"

radford-3.jpg

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Do you know the date of the map above and can you help with a couple of the things marked as FB and LB. I lived on Grimston Road Cliff Ton. I think we've mentioned this before. Did you have some connection with a chip shop and Truro Crescent?

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The second map is around 1890.

FB = Footbridge LB = Letter Box and on the railway SB = Signal Box SP = Signal Post

Now you mention it, I think we have previously mentioned the common link with Grimston Road; but as far as I'm aware I don't have any connections with chip shops or Truro Crescent.

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I was interested to see the detail of the junction on the mineral line from Babbington colliery via Newcastle colliery.

Radford Colliery was closed in the early 1960's. It was linked underground with Wollaton colliery for ventilation.

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Radford colliery was opened in 1898 & closed in 1965

Wollaton colliery was opened in 1873 & closed in 1966

The houses in Radford Woodhouse, Gate Street, Vane Street & Levers Street were built for colliers working at Wollaton Colliery,

My maternal grand parents were both born on Gate street in 1887.

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#53 the map shown must be after 1844 because thats when the Midland Railway to Mansfield opened

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That electronics shop was Eddy's, used to sell lots of ex WD stuff, think later it went up market a few doors above Horace Rogers Motorbikes selling Tv's Video's etc, can't recall it's name, NSE? should know it as wife worked there for a while

NSE - Nottingham Scientific Exchange

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Does anyone have a map of where the workings from Radford pit ran in relation to the surface? I've seen some for Clifton and Wollaton. Some of the Clifton workings stretched almost to Beeston.

My parents told me that there was an time when their house at Ainsley Estate shook with subsidence. Radford pit site was levelled by around 1964, as I remember playing on it as a little'un.

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I don't have any abandonment plans for Radford, but Wollatons south workings are shown on Clifton's abandonment workings. Clifton's north westerly workings ended way short of Beeston, the seams rise westwards, so have a limit of workings for safety to the west. due to the Bunter sandstone formation, now known as the Sherwood formation.

To the south, Clifton went under Ruddington, that was as far west as we were allowed to go.

Wollatons last faces operated under the university, they operated short wall faces with pillars left between the faces and ended just short of Castle Blvd?

When you think about it, Radford couldn't have had a large area to mine, too many old collieries around that area, Newcastle and Bulwell are two that come to mind, plus Bestwood not that far away.

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Thanks very much. Yes, I've seen the Clifton ones - I thought I saw one heading that roughly paralleled the railway past the former Freightliner depot at Beeston.

area to mine, too many old collieries around that area, Newcastle and Bulwell are two that come to mind, plus Bestwood not that far away.

Yes, I thought that Radford's workings wouldn't have been that big. However, it was active for many years.

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The closest to Beeston was probably where the outbye plate belt bunker was and delivered coal onto the Cable Belt heading up the Stone Head Drift to pit bottom. That would have been pretty close to Clifton Bridge. I'll double check.

All the north workings on three seams was carried out in the 1800's, first workings south started after the turn of the 20th century, most under West Bridgeford heading south, remember those were all hand worked, only after nationalisation was coal cut and loaded mechanically, the only face machinery pre 1950 was the undercutting machines and the Meco-Moore slicer loader.

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Bet that was some hen night?

B7y80oJCQAArmmS.jpg

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#68. I wonder how many time they had to stop to go back and pick up hats that had blown off?

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Didn't the ladies have hat pins to stop their hats blowing off??

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Yes they did. Because everyone wore hats back then, they were quite adept at keeping them on in windy weather.

My dad use to wear a trilby and I remember a seaside trip on an open-top bus, despite very gusty weather, his hat was firmly planted. Mind you, he looked a bit like that Freddie ' Parrot Face ' Davies comedian.

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In case anyone was wondering about the exact location of that photo, the Jolly Higglers was on Ilkeston Road on the corner of Prince Street (which no longer exists). On this photo the road further up - the Shipstones sign - is Redoubt Street which has survived.

higgler.jpg

The pub was later rebuilt in a modern style, and that modern version has closed down and is now a Tesco. One of many.

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Funnily enough, not far up the road from the Ilko Road Picture House mentioned on other threads.

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