mick2me

Map Requests.

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I have a number of old maps of going back to the 1800's

If there is an area of notts you would like to see, and I have it, I will scan it and post it in this area.

If you have an old Nottinghamshire map please post it here. (See Pinned topic on uploads)

PLEASE INCLUDE THE DATE OF THE MAP IF KNOWN?

If you have problems resizing images or cannot copy a map please let me know.

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Ayup Mick, I have coal authority "overlay maps" for Clifton Pit, ie the workings superimposed on surface maps. Both the Tupton and Deep Hard seams show Wollatons workings.

To the west and slightly north of Wollaton Park and north of Bramcote Moor are "old mine workings" Do any of the oldest maps around that area actually show any old collieries?? They weren't Wollatons as there are a line of boreholes, obviously driven for Wollatons safety, and Wollaton kept to the east of the boreholes.

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I will have to look at the maps I have.

I am pretty limited north of the city. I do have one colliery map which I can post but dont remember which one?

Any chance of posting that one or sending it to me for upload?

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If you have any images of Nottingham, including maps?

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Ayup Mick, I have coal authority "overlay maps" for Clifton Pit, ie the workings superimposed on surface maps. Both the Tupton and Deep Hard seams show Wollatons workings.

To the west and slightly north of Wollaton Park and north of Bramcote Moor are "old mine workings" Do any of the oldest maps around that area actually show any old collieries??  They weren't Wollatons as there are a line of boreholes, obviously driven for Wollatons safety, and Wollaton kept to the east of the boreholes.

I am working on that, Here is one for starters

Annesley-and-Newstead-Collieries 1921

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I'll have to scan it Mick, it shows Ballon Woods when it was a wood and not a housing estate!! The maps I have were made before Clifton Estate existed!! So thats pre 1950, although the workings are up todate as when they finished.

There is an old pit marked next to the old brick yard at Balloon Woods, but thats not the workings marked to the west of Wollatons.

I'd assume it was a colliery just over into Derbyshire?? Impossible to say without those abandonment maps.

I also have Cotgrave Colliery abandonment maps too, amazing how much they had extracted in the short life of the pit!

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Newstead, where ROLF was tried out and proven to be a failure..LOL (Remotely Operated Longwall Face) Coal Board spent millions on that white elephant, made many companies pretty wealthy too!

We had a system installed at Angus Place Colliery in NSW that utilized operating a "block" of chocks, six in all, from one station along the face. The operator then only had to walk forward every six chocks and remain in a safe postion at all times. It was designed by a brilliant Australian electronics feller by the name of John Smith who lived in Wollongong. That technology was exported to the UK by it's Australian Dowty subsiduary.

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.......There is an old pit marked next to the old brick yard at Balloon Woods, but thats not the workings marked to the west of Wollatons. I'd assume it was a colliery just over into Derbyshire?? Impossible to say without those abandonment maps..

Trowell Colliery rings a distant bell.....

Cheers

Robt P.

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.......There is an old pit marked next to the old brick yard at Balloon Woods, but thats not the workings marked to the west of Wollatons. I'd assume it was a colliery just over into Derbyshire?? Impossible to say without those abandonment maps..

Trowell Colliery rings a distant bell.....

Cheers

Robt P.

It would have to be a prior to the law requiring up to date working plans and abandonment plans Rob, as the workings state "believed worked" on the abandonment plan of Clifton Colliery's Deep Hard Seam. That would be prior to the 1860's??

They are about 200 yards west of "The Balloon Wood"

There are also old workings dated 1789 under Bramcote Moor, which today will be a built up area?

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Ayup Mick, I have coal authority "overlay maps" for Clifton Pit, ie the workings superimposed on surface maps. Both the Tupton and Deep Hard seams show Wollatons workings.

To the west and slightly north of Wollaton Park and north of Bramcote Moor are "old mine workings" Do any of the oldest maps around that area actually show any old collieries?? They weren't Wollatons as there are a line of boreholes, obviously driven for Wollatons safety, and Wollaton kept to the east of the boreholes.

I have now located pits mapped northeast of Wollaton Park

Posted HERE

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hi mick, i was wondering is there an easy way to overlay old maps over current maps? over than physically drawing the older map onto tracing paper (too much work!)

cheers, phil.

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Sorry Phil, I missed this post.

Someone who is a wizz with photoshop, might be able to do it with Layers?

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Hi

Have you posted the map of Cotgrave, if not could you please

Cheers

Paul

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I'll be scanning the maps during winter when I have time, as the maps are rather large, I'll scan them from the north west to east as seperate pages for my website. I have the ones for deep soft, first workings, deep hard and the developments in the Parkgate seam.

The deep hard seam was well worked and takes in two maps.

When both Cotgrave and Clifton maps are scanned and uploads to my site, I'll post a link from here.

John

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I just found this thread.

The mine workings around Balloon Woods were 'Bell Pits'. The seam here was close to the surface and they simply dug down about 10 to 15m and worked outwards from the shaft until it got too dangerous to go any further, 18th century I believe.

The one's I particularly remember as still being fairly well marked were next to the old brickworks level crossing, which is one I reckon had collapsed, and in Balloon Woods opposite the old Rolls Royce testing station. Our top playing fields up at Bilborough Grammar were full of the things, I always thought that the rugby team might vanish underground one day.

The mystery was in the small wood to the north west of Balloon Wood crossroads. For many years it contained a small headstock over a sealed shaft, we always assumed it was some sort of pumping station for Wollaton Colliery.

If you walked up the bridle road from here to Cossall, on the left hand side of the path opposite Catstone Hill was a deep stone lined shaft, surrounded with a rudimentary barbed wire fence, I wonder whether thats still there, looking on Google Earth, theres a wierd shape in a field that could be it's overgrown site.

Where the path came out near Cossall, there was a branch of the Nottingham Canal that went to a horizontal shaft that dissapeared into a hill heading south east. I clearly remember when I was very young seeing miners going into there. Many years later we attempted it ourselves after it had been abandoned, we were stopped by the local farmer who said it was full of methane gas and too dangerous to go in, he was very pleasant too, I recall. You can still see some sort of buildings on the site now.

We discovered the remains of Trowell Moor Colliery in the late 50's early 60's. At that time the winding house was more or less intact, it was a brick building with large windows and a huge brick and concrete structure in the middle that must have held the steam winding engines. One shaft had been capped off level with the ground with a concrete slab and a steel vent pipe. The other shaft had a big structure over it built of brick, about 2m high with the usual concrete slab and steel vent pipe. The slag heap had been hollowed out and was used as a dumping site for liquid slag from Stanton Ironworks. This was delivered at regular times by noisy Commer two stroke diesel tankers, we could hear them coming and hide. The liquid slag cooled then dried, it stank, I can still smell it now, it formed a light grey hard but slippery pool that was good for sliding on.

Some kids demolished part of the wall of the brick cap, you could look over the edge and see this huge shaft dissapearing below, the winding cables were embedded in the concrete slab and a dodgy steel ladder dissapeared down one side, you could smell the gases wafting up from below, chuck a brick down and it took ages before there was a bang and a splash, we assumed that the lift was still down there and that the workings were flooded up to the shaft.

We tried dropping fireworks down in the hope of lighting up the bottom, but it was too deep, they went out before they got there, even when you tied them to bricks.

One day, a whole gang of us rebuilt the wall in bricks from the engine house, when we had finished, we pushed the whole lot down the shaft, the resulting bang from below shook the ground.

I suspect that they bulldozed the slagheap down there, apart from the bridge over the railway from the canal, there's nothing to show that this place ever existed.

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It's a good job you were stopped, methane was the least of your worries, try blackdamp! Not really a gas as such, but absence od oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide! Only ever seen it once when I was on my way to examine a couple of pumps escorted by a Deputy with an oil lamp. The flame kept "lowering" every crosscut we passed until it went out completely and he couldn't relight it, we beat a hasty retreat outbye to fresh air!!

Many a mineworker has been overcome and died from that silent killer.

Just a few weeks back a stupid caver was being lowered down a disused coal mine shaft and died from blackdamp. Stupid, because all old coalmines have dangers not found in caves.

To the west of Wollaton Colliery workings is an old slough, was driven to drain the shallow workings of a colliery probably working in the 1700's. There's a "barrier" that was left between it and Wollatons workings, the area was well drilled to locate the old workings.

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Just checked the plans and tried to fix it on a modern map, scales are different and on the plans there is no built up area, but there is an old colliery with a slough somewhere under the Wollaton Rd under Fernwood Crescent area dating back to the 1780's. The slough runs approx north south and would come out just north of Derby Road around Sandy Lane or thereabouts.

Wollatons safety barrier in the Deep Hard seam would be around Glaisdale Drive to protect it from the flooded old 1790's pit, and runs north south and approx 300 metres thick.

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No wonder me mothers house on Park Crescent has a bulging gable end, the ground under that area must have been dug over and under so many times it must be very dodgey, I doubt whether they cared about that when it was built in the 1930's, I'm surprised it still stands.

With regard to our attempts to enter Cossall drift mine, quite right, we could have been newspaper headlines, when you're 10, you think you know everything, but it was lucky that the farmer was about.

We even had a cunning plan to tie ropes together and attempt to climb the ropey steel ladder down into the depths of the Trowell Moor shaft, no doubt Mr Daredevil here would have been the one to unwisely try it, a good job it was away from the demolished side of the capping structure.

Sometimes I wonder how I survived those days, my attempts at scaling the Hemlock Stone almost ended up with me being impaled on the railings, there was only one way up and I was too small to reach for that vital hand hold at the overhang, try and try, oh sod it, bang.

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Is there any chance of any old maps of the Bramcote n Chilwell Areas...Thanks.

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Newstead, where ROLF was tried out and proven to be a failure..LOL (Remotely Operated Longwall Face) Coal Board spent millions on that white elephant, made many companies pretty wealthy too!

We had a system installed at Angus Place Colliery in NSW that utilized operating a "block" of chocks, six in all, from one station along the face. The operator then only had to walk forward every six chocks and remain in a safe postion at all times. It was designed by a brilliant Australian electronics feller by the name of John Smith who lived in Wollongong. That technology was exported to the UK by it's Australian Dowty subsiduary.

[/

I wondered where that ROLF system went after it's original installation at Ormonde Colliery near Ripley. I saw it in operation there in 1957.

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I have a number of old maps of going back to the 1800's

If there is an area of notts you would like to see, and I have it, I will scan it and post it in this area.

If you have an old Nottinghamshire map please post it here. (See Pinned topic on uploads)

PLEASE INCLUDE THE DATE OF THE MAP IF KNOWN?

If you have problems resizing images or cannot copy a map please let me know.

Hi there mick2me.

Im new to these forums but very interested in old maps of nottingham.

For the past few days i've been trying to locate a 'providence street' in nottingham. It existed in 1891 as its on the census.

Also 'ropewalk street' which i found in an 1862 wright's nottingham directory, as my great, great grandfather has a shop listed there.

Not sure which areas these are in but hoping you may be able to help.

I look forward to any reply off you,

Thanks, pat

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Welcome RedPat

Thanks Fynger. I've lived in nottingham all my life (clifton.)

I've recently become very interested in its history whilst researching my family tree.

Strange when i think i know more history about other country's than the place i live!!!!!!!!! lol

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