letsavagoo

Pronouncing place names (and how to eat food politely)

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Can't forget the classic on Candid Camera with Jonathan Rouse asking folks where Chee-ap-si-dee was [Cheapside]

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Just though of another, the locals in Llanelli pronounce it 'lesh ly' - go figure.

Close but no cigar. Klan-ech-ly is more like it; but you'll find that the Welsh only do that when talking to an Englishman as it gives them a good excuse to spit on him!

Closer to home; the local pronunciation of the Lincolnshire village of Folkingham is always good for a bit of a laugh.

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In Devon there are two places called Woolfardisworthy, and believe it or not, they are pronounced differently, even though they are not 25 miles apart! One is pronounced Woolsery, but don't ask me which one!

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Not forgetting my non-favourite place ASPLEH !

TV reporters say Bass-Ford not Basford !

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I once had a friend tell me of someone who kept telling her that she had 'pierced stairs' - and she kept saying sorry, don't understand what you are saying! - eventually it came out that the girl was telling her that she had 'pierced ears'. And this friend is a Nottingham girl......!

Yes - Bass-ford winds me up too!!!! If only they would ask.................

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Two villages away is a place called oola,which means apples as there were many orchards in this place years ago.

Some years ago an American pulled up and asked me if -

"Zero zero LA" was down the road?

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Now not let us all forget the TV series called Paradise Heights (Later revived as (The Eustace Brothers IMMSC) which was set and filmed in Nottingham, where Ralph Little's character keeps referring to Sneeenton as opposed to Snenton, obviously because in his script he's seen it written ''Sneinton''!

Whilst I'm at it, when I worked for the RAC back in the late 80's early 90's I was on Leicester Forest East services and got asked by some Aussies if I could tell them how to get to Loogaboorah.................. I'll let you work that one out for yourselves.

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In Oz they pronounce Derby as Durrby, and maroon is maroan, I usually come back and say Oh so the Moon is a moan too !

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Bool......................for bulwell

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A few years ago I had an op on my knee at the hospital of "Bra" no joking.

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In Northumberland you have to know when the letter L is silent. Ulgham is pronounced 'Uffam' and Alnwick rhymes with 'Panic' - but 5 miles down the river from Alnwick is Alnmouth - and there you do pronounce the L.

My son lived for a while in Huddersfield - near there is Slatterthwaite - pronounced 'Slow (to rhyme with cow) - it'

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I was told by the Dean [I think] inside Southwell Minster that locals pronounce the name as South-well, but everywhere else in the county it's 'Suthel' and everywhere else in the country it's whatever you decide....and the racecourse is always pronounced as 'Suthel', even by locals.

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Welcome Danum.  When I was growing up we always pronounced it South-well.  Only in Later years did I hear Suthall.

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I've always understood it that the locals call it Suthull but immigrants to the area call it South-well because Suthull doesn't sound posh enough for them. 

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I think the genuine locals do  call it Suthull as you say Malcolm. It's just the influx of the 'Nouveau Riche' that like to pronounce it Southwell.

You know the sort, pristine wax jackets, Terry Pratchett style hat, Hunter wellies and a 4WD that's never seen a speck of mud !

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Re #62, the village near Huddersfield is Slaithwaite but as Tim says, pronounced Slough- it although locals also refer to it as Slath-wate;  ya pays yer money an teks  yer pick!

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I've lived within three miles of Southwell for 55 years. In my experience the "proper" locals call it South-well as do the rustic population of the surrounding villages. Suthull is "Nottingham speak". That's what I call it as I'm a townie from Woodthorpe.

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1 hour ago, FLY2 said:

I think the genuine locals do  call it Suthull as you say Malcolm. It's just the influx of the 'Nouveau Riche' that like to pronounce it Southwell.

You know the sort, pristine wax jackets, Terry Pratchett style hat, Hunter wellies and a 4WD that's never seen a speck of mud !

I live, as I previously said, close to Southwell. I have a wax jacket (but not pristine), a flat cap, cheap green wellies and a 4x4 which is filthy. I'm a country dweller - that's what we do. Am I nouveau riche? - I'll leave that to others to decide!

 

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No Phil, you're normal !

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#65

 

I'm with you on that one, Pianoman. I've met a few pretentious sorts who live there...you know the kind...wipe their noses on their sleeves when they think no one's looking!  :wacko:

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Many years ago, I worked for the senior partner at Rotheras, Solicitors, Peter Howard Mellors. He was also Registrar to the Diocese of Southwell and lived in a house on Burgage Green.  He wasn't a native of the place but he loved it very much.

 

Peter graduated from Cambridge with a First in History, a subject he adored. I've seen him sit with the cleaner's grandchild after the office had closed for the day, helping with their history homework and he would hold them spellbound with his knowledge of Nottingham's past in a way that few teachers can achieve.

 

A truly lovely man who was a gentleman in every sense of the word. He looked so distinguished in his black gown and 'tea cosy' as he termed his lawyer's wig! Passed from this life far too young at only 63.

 

He'd be horrified at the wholesale destruction of Nottingham's buildings.

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Phil, I'm pleased you've written a description of what you usually wear - we'll all be able to recognise you easily at the next meet up!

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