letsavagoo

Pronouncing place names (and how to eat food politely)

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On 12/11/2015 at 8:08 AM, BeestonMick said:

Southwell is Southwell, my sister will kill you if you say it otherwise, which every BBC racing blokey pronounces suthall (and you have Southall in London) and Colwick (COLLICK) which is often pronounced COL WICK. I would say 'Renn oth' and 'Blidd eth' are correct pronunciations. There's a place I have to deal with in Norfolk called Costessey and the locals call it 'kossy'.

Gudinit!

It was Suthell when I lived there briefly as a kid - never heard of 'Southwell' until the 1990s and poncy London incomers!

 

Mansfield friend born and bred insists it is Rennoth!

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Dated a lass from suthell in the 80's totally down to earth..however it was still southwell!

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I have always called it Suthell and shall continue to do so! Have worked with some jumped up types who, having moved there, insist it is South Well. You know the sort...they eat their peas with a knife! :blink:

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The debate about Suthell or South-well crops up now and then. I was born and raised in Radford. my father (born Mapperley but Hyson Green raised) always called it Suthell saying this was the correct way. I moved to just outside Southwell almost 20 years years ago. Most natives of this area use the South-well pronunciation. Nothing to do with Nouveau Riche poncy southerners moving in or 'not sounding posh enough' as some have posted here. Simply the way it is. I'm not jumped up but do now use South-well as after 20 years I'm allowed to. I don't use a knife to eat peas. I use a spoon!

Nearby Norwell (North Well from Roman times I believe) is pronounced Norrel by locals not as logic dictates Nore -well.

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As long as we all know where we mean, does it matter?  As to peas, if you squash them flat they stay on the knife more easily! :rolleyes:

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I’ve lived in the area for 56 years. I can see the tips of the twin towers of the Minster from my bedroom window. I came from Woodthorpe where we knew it as Suthull. I still call it Suthull. The indigenous people call it Southwell. That’s both the posh and not so posh. They do take a pleasure In correcting you though!

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56 minutes ago, Jill Sparrow said:

I have always called it Suthell and shall continue to do so! Have worked with some jumped up types who, having moved there, insist it is South Well. You know the sort...they eat their peas with a knife! :blink:

A Scottish doctor friend of mine always ate his peas from a knife. I marvelled at his dexterity. Is this a Scottish custom?

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No. That made it all the more remarkable. I’ve never seen peas eaten this way before. I have seen tea drunk from a saucer.

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I never have a problem with peas though. I just slurp them off the wooden fork provided.

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Should you eat them off the back of a fork or should the fork be used like a shovel. Or do you skewer them on the tines. What does etiquette dictate?

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1 hour ago, Jill Sparrow said:

As long as we all know where we mean, does it matter?  As to peas, if you squash them flat they stay on the knife more easily! :rolleyes:

No Jill. It doesn't matter but when I hear the news readers on the BBC say Wol at on or bas ford it erks me. Maybe they're right. Who knows. Still cringe though. I love listening to Radio Nottingham coverage of Notts County matches where they often 'tek a corner' or 'ge the ball away'. Priceless. Feel right at om.

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It all depends Phil, whether you have garden or mushy. Garden peas, the only way is fork/shovel. That way you know you can get a decent mouthful. Mushy peas, that's another story. I prefer mine with mint sauce and a slice of bread and butter. When we first moved to East Sussex, used to take great delight in asking for fish and mixed ! (Our local chippy was 12miles away) They hadn't a clue what I was asking for ! Another one was " pie, chips and gravy". I always got a look of horror. Pies down here always seem to be sold still in the wrapper. B.

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Thanks Beekay. It’s good to have an etiquette advisor on this forum. I’ll feel more at ease when I’m next sampling the Sat Bains tasting menu. Don’t want to let the side down.:biggrin:

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I eat my peas with honey

I've done it all my life

It makes the peas taste funny

But keeps them on my knife

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My father in law used to eat marrowfat peas in a sandwich. Solves the problem! He came from Newcastle so don’t know if it is a Geordie thing.

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Marrowfat peas ?? They're big enough to eat individually, you can slice them and then they'd fit better on bread. We've tried to improve our social standing and always eat Petit Pois. Always make sure one has one's little finger cocked, with a forkful, (like sipping tea in China cups).

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3 minutes ago, philmayfield said:

Elegance and Newcastle. These are words that go together well!

Elegance and Newcastle, spot on Phil. Where they wash their hands before going to the loo.

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Just mix em in to the spuds (a bit like mixing concrete) they don't go anywhere, and slosh a bit of gravy in for good measure. That's how we did it in St Anns!

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