Ailments, Aches & Pains. (Let's hear them here)


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Sorry you're still feeling rough, Catfan.  I reckon it's better to go without food completely when you're feeling grotty - just drink plenty of fluids and sleep a lot!  That's what Paul did when he felt nauseous last weekend and he is now better (although he lost 3 Kg in weight). 

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Glad Paul feeling better Margie.........only met him the once......but he looks as if he's same as me,.....don't put weight on easily ?

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Actually Ben, Paul does have to be careful what he eats but he plays table tennis twice a week which keeps him fit.  Also, he is always the one who ends up stacking up all the chairs at church and helping me to clear up for over 2 hours after each of the 2 Toddler .Groups .... and he is still working outside at the moment putting some shelves up in the shed after clearing up the fallen leaves and cutting the lawn.  He is very active!

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Something just popped up on my Facebook newsfeed about macular degeneration, which I have.  It spoke about various hallucinations that can happen to sufferers of this.  It is called Charles Bonnet syndrome and one of the hallucinations mentioned was rats running over the carpet and people walking across the room.  It reminded me of Nonna's mum who 'saw' mice in her bedroom and also  someone walking out of a wall? Door? Perhaps this was the cause?   It makes fascinating reading if you want to google it.  I haven't put a link as there are several sites about it.

I tried  to send Nonna a pm but there was no 'message' box to click on.  Don't know why..

I don't have actual hallucinations except sometimes  in the fraction of a second before I wake up suddenly ....but I can  see gardens - and sometimes people - when I half close my eyes in the dark.  It's quite interesting, so I occasionally try to do it!!

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Interesting that Margie..........must have been what my Dad had........he was convinced he could see little people running all over his bed........we put it down to his medication ,.....they never scared him in fact i think he quite enjoyed it...........i too have hallucinations often just before waking in the morning,and must admit don't mind em...........often think i'm in a house (one of several) that i used to live in........the mind is something i don't think anyone really understands......in fact often wake up with a different wife..........lol.

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Maude my land-lady in Coalville back in the 60s certainly left an impression with you Loppy..............as she did with me............thankfully she's never part of my 'hallucinations''.............bless her..............

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I have a friend whose husband was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. He suffered with it for many years and was taking very high doses of the Levadopa drug, Madopar. Levadopa can be very beneficial for mobility in Parkinson's but can also cause horrendous side effects, including hallucinations, which many people find terrifying. My friend's husband was fortunate. His main hallucination was Jerry, the mouse, from the Tom and Jerry cartoons! Jerry often appeared on the kitchen worktop and danced around! I don't think he was a particularly avid fan of Tom and Jerry but then I don't suppose you can choose your own hallucination! As Ben said, we understand very little about the brain.

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Thanks for bringing up Parkinson’s yes you can get hallucinations but it’s the condition not so much the meds. Also you can get R.E.M. this is when you go to sleep and have vivid dreams. Normal people when they go to sleep there body freezes this is the only way l can explain it when you have R.E.M. you live your dreams. My husband has R.E.M. he has jumped out of bed ran into walls had me by the throat and lots of other bad dreams. 

I also have Parkinson’s 

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I gave you the like Mary.........obviously not because you have Parkinsons........which my Dad had......but because of the REM mention,....i have had really vivid dreams all my life......not often nightmares but dreams that make me think ''why did i dream that''.....they are crazy and cannot think of a logical reason for them........used to sleepwalk a lot into my 20s........so much so when lodging away with co workers they refused to share a room with me..........like i say ,the brain is a funny thing........more to it than we will ever know...............

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Paul and I both used to sleepwalk when we were young children, as did all our children.  I occasionally still jump out of bed in the middle of the night and start walking, then wake up and wonder what on Earth I'm doing!  I also talk in my sleep, which wakes Paul up, but he says that  most of the words are unintelligible.  

I woke up this morning having just dreamt that the Bulwell Wetherspoons was covered with scaffolding.  It was so real, I thought I must have read about it somewhere. ...

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Everyone experiences periods of REM or rapid eye movement sleep.this is a fairly shallow stage but was always thought to be the stage of the sleep cycle where dreams occurred, although recent research indicates that dreaming can occur at much deeper levels of the cycle.

 

We are usually paralysed by our brains when dreaming, to prevent acting out our dreams but, in some people, that doesn't seem to work.  Sleepwalking is, I believe, something which occurs at a dreamless stage of the sleep cycle. My older sister sleepwalked constantly as a child but I never did.

 

My mother, who was misdiagnosed with Parkinson's, was trialled with Levadopa but it had no effect, other than adverse cardiac symptoms. She actually had multiple system atrophy which is untreatable and incurable. One night she fell out of bed and broke her shoulder because, I believe, she was trying to act out her dreams. Parkinson's is really an umbrella term for a great many different types of neurological disease and even the specialists are still whistling in the dark with most of them.

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Our GP who we were with at the time said he would have a meeting with the other GPS. When master went back to see them, GP told us to sleep in separate rooms, this was after he jumped up and ran into the wall, on this occasion I had to fail 999 as he was only semi alert. Changed GP when we moved they did not believe what was happening gave master some tabs that they give children who wet the bed. Changed GPS again when we moved this time ask if master could see someone who specializes in his condition. Saw a professor Jill Baker at QMC. She diagnose REM, straight away. This took 12years to find what the condition was. Before that I have been kicked, got my night dress ripped, kicked out of bed, hit in the face, and much more, I got to the state that I could wake up as soon as master moved, and used to put my arm over him to stop him jumping out of bed, one night he got so violent I put my arm over him and we both fell on the floor together, just one more thing you can not wake master up no matter how much you shout.

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Don't want to scare anyone but I believe there was a well publicised murder trial some years ago where a man strangled his wife whilst he claimed he was asleep. He was acquitted on expert medical evidence. Somehow, I've always had my doubts about the verdict!

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I don't know, but he's certainly got Mary well trained !

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I was wondering if referring to husband as 'Master' was a regional saying. I have a nephew and he and his wife are both in their mid twenties. His wife is from Langley Mill and she has always called him 'Master' since they got married. Can't say I'm keen on it, but I'm not keen on 'Madam' either. Anyone know if it's regional?

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Seems like quite a lot of these forms of address can go back a long way.  I think Master is just a long form of the abbreviation Mr.   I'm pretty sure Mrs. Is a short form of Mistress.  I'm not calling Mrs. L that either.  :biggrin:

 

I always thought Madam, was the term for the owner of a house of ill repute.  ;)

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Living only a mile or so from Langley Mill I've never heard it. I presumed it was tongue in cheek the way some of us call our wives 'she who must be obeyed'. I've heard women refer to their husband 'my mester' and my Grandma called Grandad 'father'... unless he was in trouble and then was named.

 

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Migraine.

 

Used to have a lot of them but this is the first for a while.  I'm trying to type fast while I can still see the keyboard and screen. Funny thing is that most people seem to think Migraine is just some sort of glorified headache.  Trust me.. it is a lot more than that.  In fact I rarely get much of a headache.  What I do get are visual disturbances.. lots of alternate zig-zags of yellow and blue lines which start off flickering in the corner of my eye and then gradually get bigger until they fill my vision then go out of view.  After that I either carry on.. feeling a bit like I've been drained of blood and energy.. or I go to bed.. whereupon I sleep for pretty much exactly four hours and then wake feeling like I've been drained of blood and energy...  The headache is usually only slight, but the 'hangover' is quite unpleasant.

 

In the worst case, I can get numbness down one side, or I can find it really hard to make sense of people's faces.. so that I sort of recognise them.. but don't.. if that makes sense.

 

Thing is.. where Migraine is concerned I think I'm pretty fortunate.  Some people have very severe headaches.. nausea and vomiting and can be 'out of it' for days. Never had it that bad.. touch wood..

 

Anyway, I started typing this when it started and the flashing lights are beginning to go away now.  I suppose I should be in bed.. but I think I'll just work through this for a bit longer and see if it goes.

 

When I was still working.. it wasn't unusual for one of these to start midway through an interview with a client.  Not much choice but to carry on and hope for the best. I have no idea wht I looked like, whether I made sense or whether anybody noticed.. :wacko:

 

The flashing lights have gone away now, but my vision is a bit sort of 'wobbly'.

 

I'm just going to finish a large, cheap Brandy with milk.  It's not likely to cure the migraine.. but it will make me less bothered eitherway...  ;)

 

By the way.... if anyone uses 'Migraleve'.  The pink tablets do seem to help.....  they have Paracetamol plus some sort of 'magic' ingredient.  The Yellow tablets are a total rip off, as they are simply massively overpriced Paracetamol.

 

I can see clearly again now..

 

That was fun....:dry: 

 

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I gave you a like Col, not because I like what is happening to you but because you are the first one who has described symptoms that I get periodically.  Not as debilitating as yours but scary the first time it happened about four years ago.

 

Mine can appear randomly at any time of day.  No headache or nauseous feeling, just the flashing lights and wavy lines.  These can start anywhere in your field of vision then gradually drift to the edge and disappear until the next time.  This can be days or even weeks.  Scared me at first I thought I might be having a stroke.  I've just learned to co-exist with it now.  Never thought of it as a migraine because they are usually associated with splitting headaches.  Just the onslaught of age I guess.  I will not go to the doctors with it.  Probably just result in lots of inconclusive tests and possible pills with potential side effects.

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