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Ailments, Aches & Pains. (Let's hear them here)

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Thought I'd had my chips again last night! Time for bed so after my last NS fix, I closed my my Laptop, went to stand up and colopsed in a pile on the floor. When I came round, I had to crawl up stairs to hubbs, (I couldn't talk ne'mind shout). Vertigo or sommat. I had been off color all day, my Beta blockers hadn't worked and i had been tachycardic on and off all day. Immediate thoughts..heart attack. Ambulance, Hospital, all sorts of tests and thankfully not my heart.

Phew, at about 5am i started to feel better, In our panic, we can't even remember what the doc called it. Laden with another box of pills, I was discharged, to drive through Wolvo at 6am in my dressing gown. Strange feeling, my excuse would be Pajama Party! Anyone ever go to one of those? Well again, I live to tell the tale. Having a lazy day today. One grateful Nottstalgian here. :)

Just read your post catfan. Sorry to read of your latest problems. Hope they get you sorted miduck. Pint of Hobgobblin should do the trick. Looking forward to seeing you all on Wednesday as well. Take Care. xx

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Carni so sorry to hear about your passing out attack do hope you're feeling better. We had a scare the other day. My husband had to go on a diet for 2 days to have an exam on the 3 rd day. He had an anesthetic and came home starving. He almost ate me out of house and home. As soon as he'd finished he said he didnt feel too good and a few minutes later passed out in the chair sitting at the table. Called the ambulance and they carried out various tests and sent for another ambulance to take him to hospital. The emercency ambulance went and they carried my husband into the other one. He was there all afternoon and came home about 5 pm. When he'd finished this exam he and his sister went into a bar to have breakfast, so with that and a large lunch his stomach couldnt take it. I'd prepared something light and also the evening meal but he said he was so hungry that he'd have both. Is this another story of "

" I'm right , he's wrong. End of story"

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Thankfully, he is alright now nonnaB. Sometimes sadly, we find out what we can and can't do the hard way. My best wishes for good results from his exam.

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Carni, very glad to hear you're OK.

That sounds like some form of 'Syncope', which is the fancy word for fainting. It can happen if you're on Beta Blockers, or other meds, or if you have a Heart condition, or for lots of other reasons. I'm not an expert. I just happen to have read a lot about it in the last few days as I've been having 'coughing syncope'. Am still full of a head cold and am coughing up rocks and pebbles, especially first thing in the morning. Unless I sit down or hang on to something I just flop to the floor. All to do with blood supply to the brain I think. I don't pass out completely, but I've seen it happen. Big massive bloke at the bar in my local. Coughed a couple of times then went down like a sack of spuds. Took us a while to get him up but it turned out he had a chest infection and heart issues.

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Fainting/Pages/Causes.aspx

Take care!

Col

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Thank you for that info DJ360. We asked the Doc twice what it was called and it sounded like Watigo???. He explained about three little channels, so small that you can't see them(I imagine the professionals can), filled with fluid and sometimes with movement it can make the fluid tilt, causing all sorts of problems., added to it, heart problems and meds to make it worse.

We have looked up Watigo and can't find anything resembling it, the Doc was a foreign Gentleman, so perhaps his accent threw us. He may have said Vertigo? Let me know if anyone has heard of a variation to Watigo?

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He didn't say Watigo, he said 'What a way to go!'

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Ayup Chulls, You're probably right there! You made me laugh now. Chris just yelled from the back ground Well Done Chulla, no mean feat there.

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One of the unexpected benefits of Nottstalgia ........ if you aren't feeling too well, you can come on here and talk about it; and within a few minutes someone else will be along who is suffering worse than you, so then you feel better.

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Good bit of logic there CliffTon, and very true. Makes you count your blessings.

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Glad you are o-k, Carni. Very unpleasant experience. I would be willing to bet that the dr. said, vertigo.

Some of yers 'avin a rough ride just now. Hope you and those you love are all soon back on yer feet.

Edited to add. Maybe the docs trying to learn Nottinghamese and what he actually said was, wasupwiyo?

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Hope you'll soon feel better Carni, and back to your old self - don't mean 'old' old btw....

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Carni hes fine thanks and back and slaving over a hot stove.!! He got the results immediately and everything is perfect.

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Bit late responding to Carni's account of a worrying night. Rest up and get well soon. Hope you will be fit enough for a quick trip to Nottingham on Wednesday duckeh!

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Hopefully you'll be better soon Carni. Just lay off the cream cakes for a day.

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Would you believe it catfan; that is exactly what we have had! We did share and didn't eat all of the chips. Now the Cadburys Fruit and Nut, that is a different matter. I let Chris look at a square. :biggrin:

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Sorry to hear your poorly Catfan. fluff up your tail n clean your whiskers. Take care of yourself.

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Just had a phone call from QMC if I can attend tomorrow for a neurophysiology test ! Where needles & electrodes will be fixed on my legs etc. to check for extent of nerve damage.

Mrs Catfan outside in the garden having a giggling fit, she says tomorrow I get plugged into the mains noblue

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Better hope the voltage is low or yer fur will stand on end and you'll arch yer back.

Sorry! Couldn't resist it.

Hope it goes well for you.

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Catfan, hope everything will go well for your neurophysiology test tomorrow. Is it going to tickle I wonder!

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Apparently yes Margie ! noblue

Electromyography, or EMG, is used to diagnose nerve and muscle dysfunction and spinal cord disease. It records the electrical activity from the brain and/or spinal cord to a peripheral nerve root (found in the arms and legs) that controls muscles during contraction and at rest.

During an EMG, very fine wire electrodes are inserted into a muscle to assess changes in electrical voltage that occur during movement and when the muscle is at rest. The electrodes are attached through a series of wires to a recording instrument. Testing usually takes place at a testing facility and lasts about an hour but may take longer, depending on the number of muscles and nerves to be tested. Most patients find this test to be somewhat uncomfortable.

An EMG is usually done in conjunction with a nerve conduction velocity (NCV) test, which measures electrical energy by assessing the nerve’s ability to send a signal. This two-part test is conducted most often in a hospital. A technician tapes two sets of flat electrodes on the skin over the muscles. The first set of electrodes is used to send small pulses of electricity (similar to the sensation of static electricity) to stimulate the nerve that directs a particular muscle. The second set of electrodes transmits the responding electrical signal to a recording machine. The physician then reviews the response to verify any nerve damage or muscle disease. Patients who are preparing to take an EMG or NCV test may be asked to avoid caffeine and not smoke for 2 to 3 hours prior to the test, as well as to avoid aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for 24 hours before the EMG. There is no discomfort or risk associated with this test.

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Best of British tomorrow Mick,tell 'em not too many puncture holes..might spring a hobgoblin leak!!

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Straight back to the Kiln for some proper treatment afterwards ! hellothere

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