Paul Robey

The People's History of Pop

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Missed that Cliff!!

Europe Endless,showroom Dummies,Trans Europe Express etc..very good driving music as well!

Did Tangerine Dream play the Albert Hall..'75-'76 sure I saw them there.

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I did see Barclay James Harvest there in 1975. It was my first night in Nottingham and I'd seen them the night before in Ipswich too.

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Hippo Girl mentioned Dawn Trader. They're still performing the occasional gig. Mick Preston, the lead singer, is an old workmate of mine.

As well as all the venues mentioned, don't forget the university. I went to many a memorable gig there in the 70s, including the aforementioned Gary Glitter, Curved Air, Babe Ruth, and many others.

This site lists but a few - http://wonkhe.com/blogs/university-of-nottingham-gig-central/

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I've now been away from Nottm. since late '71. but still have so many memories of the music scene and my own developing awareness of music.

I was into music since my earliest memories and can still see in my minds eye, my Mum singing along to the Rediffusion radio set as she did the housework. All those 1950s hits by Mitch Miller, Guy Mitchell, the Stargazers etc., followed by Elvis, the Everlys, Little Richard, Chuck Berry, Holly etc..

But the only place a young lad like me from a working class background heard any of this was on the BBC 'Light Programme'. They rarely played 'pop' records, except on the 'Uncle Mac' Children's Favourites programme on Saturday and the odd 'pop' song on 'Two Way Family Favourites' around Sunday Lunchtime. I suppose if you had a 'proper' radio that could pick up Luxembourg, you heard more. But we didn't.

TV wasn't a lot better., but programmes such as the 'Six-Five Special', 'Oh Boy!', 'Boy Meets Girl' and 'Thank Your Lucky Stars' all helped me to hear at least some music.

In the early 1960s I was hearing some of the more 'with it' kids at High Pavement talking about 'The Dungeon Club' and singing what I now know to be R and B/Soul stuff. A couple were even getting into bands and at least two were later working with nationally known outfits.

My first proper 'Gig' was going to see Ray Charles around 1962/3 when I was 13 or 14. I went along with a school friend and we attended the 'First House' because it was cheaper.

I think it was at the Odeon. Not too far from the Nottm Albert Hall? Memory fades and Nottm has changed a lot since I left. I was struck by the way that Ray, this man who came across as big strong and muscular in typical album cover portraits actually had short legs and feet that barely touched the ground when sitting at his piano stool. Unsurprisngly, he also had to be led out onto the stage in what I thought was quite a casual manner. I can also still see his backing singers, The Raylets, in bright yellow dresses. The First House wasn't full and I recall being a bit upset that Nottingham didn't appreciate Ray. That's until we came out and saw the queue for the second house. A massive queue running up the road and round the corner to (I think) where the old Albert Hall and cathedral used to be. (Maybe still are)

After that I saw the odd 'group' here and there, but was too interested in motorbikes and those other exciting things... what were they?.. Oh yes.. Girls!

It all went a bit quickly after that... First foray into the Beachcomber would be late '66, I was captivated by the music. So fresh and new to me, but also the smell of the place. A combination of stale booze, perfume, tobacco etc., which was so evocative of pure hedonism at the time.

Saw Cream at Nottingham Tech.. way up on the top floor of that building which is now part of Nottingham Trent Uni. I remember seeing it being built in the 1950s. I spent most of that concert half way up a PA stack actually trying to see something. What I saw Ginger Baker's head rolling back and forth. What I heard was rendered unintelligible as my ear drums gave up.

Around the same time I also saw Pentagle at the Nottingham Albert Hall. Very different. Most people struggled to hear them. We all had guitars way back. All desperately trying to learn to play like Bert Jansch or John Renbourn.

Back to the Beachcomber. It became at least a weekly haunt. I saw many bands which are now probably forgotten, but were usually entertaining. On the other hand I saw Jeff Beck a few times, with Rod Stewart singing and Aynsley Dunbar on drums. Also Chris Farlowe and the Thunderbirds at an 'All Nighter'. Georgie Fame, who had been playing elsewhere, came along and mercilessly heckled Farlowe. Later, upstairs in what would now be called the 'chill out' area, I was having a coffee and watched Farlowe and Fame playing pinball. Fame won, and as I recall the girl who arrived with Farlowe, left with Fame. By now, I was gasping with thirst after booziing all night until the bar closed. But I had no money left. So, when a sixpence (Good for a coffee) was dropped by Fame's Bongo player, and I spotted where it went, I strolled over and picked it up, only to be descended upon and relieved of it with a big 'Fanks mate!' I remember thinking 'I thought these were rich musicians?'

One night.. it could have been the same night.. I was sitting in a stairwell that led up to the groundfloor 'hatch' which served as an entrance for musicians bring 'gear' into the basement. I was there because it was generally cooler. I heard an 'Excuse me mate', and turned to see Zoot Money in his 'Yeti Suit'. I naturally moved aside.

Most weekends we also dodged around between the three Boat Clubs.

The Nottingham and Union Rowing Club' The 'Union'

The Britannia Rowing Club The 'Brit'

The Nottingham Boat Club The 'Boat'

Saw loads of people at those three, but it's late. I'll add more later.

Col

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Hippo Girl mentioned Dawn Trader. They're still performing the occasional gig. Mick Preston, the lead singer, is an old workmate of mine.

As well as all the venues mentioned, don't forget the university. I went to many a memorable gig there in the 70s, including the aforementioned Gary Glitter, Curved Air, Babe Ruth, and many others.

This site lists but a few - http://wonkhe.com/blogs/university-of-nottingham-gig-central/

I can confirm that Episode Six accompanied me in Hugh Stuart Hall of the Uni when I did a few DJ spots around 69/70. ;) I believe some of them later became part of Deep Purple or something.....

Col

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Re post 62.... Hi Rob, yes I believe Dawn trader with Mick Preston back on the road, Andy and Keith are now in Tristram shandy, which was Andys band from Palais days ......

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DJ360. There were some pop-record programmes on BBC radio, other than those you mention. In the early 1950s (1950 to 1954) there was Jack Jackson's Record Roundup. His was a lively presentation, copied in later years by Kenny Everett and Terry Wogan and others. I believe that there was a policy at the BBC in those days that a particular record could only be played on air once a day. I suppose it didn't want to be accused of plugging.

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On 12th July 1969,went to a concert called '12 hours of happiness' it was on colwick race course.The compere was John Peel.Bands were,status quo,the nice,Edgar broughton band,idle race,juniors eyes,king crimson,I think there were more but I've forgotten.Tickets were 17/6 from the birdcage boutique in Nottingham.

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Peoples History of 60s music just started on Radio Nottm.

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I'll put it on immediately.

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From a previous topic:

I saw Led Zeppelin, Juicy Lucy, Uriah Heep (I think) Canned Heat and lot's more at the Boat. As I recall it was rock at the Boat, soul at the Union and crap at the Brit (pop stuff)

My favourite was the Beach though, always there on a Friday and Sunday. The Dungeon was good as well especially the all nighters.

I loved Juicy Lucy - after seeing Glenn Campbell (not the Wichita line man) play I was hooked on steel guitar for life.

There was a lot going on at the Albert Hall as well, I saw Wishbone Ash, Black Sabbath and T-rex there.

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Hi crankypig, I was at the '12 Hours of Happiness' festival. It is mentioned in my blog. You've missed off the artist list Eclection and Yes.

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I remember Juicy Lucy at the Boat, I saw many great performers there late sixties, early seventies but missed out on Led Zeppelin both times. Spent many, many evenings at the Union but never a big Brit fan. The boat clubs were my most used haunts, only a couple of hundred yards walk from my house.

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I remember us getting in a fight in the Union with some young army cadets who were in uniform and throwing their weight about. One of my mates was a sailor and hated the army so he just couldn't help stirring it. He was a big lad and ended up throwing two of them in the Trent, uniforms n'all, the others cleared off, twas a glorious night!

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Yes Mick,there were some Daft Buggers about,.......came out of the 'Boat' one night and a Forest player of the 60s offered to race me over the Trent for a 'Fiver'......him swimming and me running,.......I thought 'Nice one' easy fiver here,.........anyway I was half way over Trent Bridge and saw him climbing out the other side,in his 'Y' fronts.............I kept running all the way to Town.......I didn't even have a Fiver......lol.

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DJ360. There were some pop-record programmes on BBC radio, other than those you mention. In the early 1950s (1950 to 1954) there was Jack Jackson's Record Roundup. His was a lively presentation, copied in later years by Kenny Everett and Terry Wogan and others. I believe that there was a policy at the BBC in those days that a particular record could only be played on air once a day. I suppose it didn't want to be accused of plugging.

I'm sure you're right Chulla. I remember a few other BBC progs such as Briam Matthew's 'Saturday Club', which featured the odd record, but mostly live performances by assorted folk. The only thing I definitely remember hearing on that was the Yardbirds singing Howlin' Wolf (Chester Burnett) 's 'Smokestack Lightnin', Though I vaguely recall the Beatles etc., being featured along the way.

There was a Tuesday? evening prog around 5:00 pm which featured a lot of Merseybeat. Definitely remember the Beatles doing 'Kansas City' on that plus the Cryin' Shames doing something. Lot more. but it's all a blur now. Also a lunchtime prog which featured 'Bernard Rabin and the Rabin Band', along with a young Clodagh Rogers and others, usually doing covers of current hits.

Col

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#76 Col. Bernard Radin? For years there was an Oscar Rabin Band. Did he have a son who took over?

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The lunchtime show was Go Man Go which included the Oscar Rabin band till his death in 1959 when it became Dave Ede and the Rabin band. There were different comperes used like Alan Freeman, Diz Disley and Dan Moss. It ran from 1959 to 1963.

The Bernard was probably Bernard Hermann ( not Rabin) who conducted the BBC Northern Dance Orchestra for Make Way For Music, another lunchtime show. Also Parade Of The Pops featured Bob Miller and The Miller Men.

The Musicians Union had a strict policy about the amount of music that they would allow on radio from records rather than live bands.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Go_Man_Go_%28radio_show%29

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Wasn't there a piece of music played by a band, and every now and then they'd all stop playing and yell Go Man Go? Also seeing A lan Freeman's name mentioned immediately brought back his signature tune to his show and him saying Welcome, Pop Pickers.

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About 1990-1,i went to see Chuck Berry at the Ice Stadium,in suitable attire..obviously! I stood right at the stage and watched an amazing set,towards the end he called myself and herself up to dance with him!!

'Sweet Little Rock n Roller' became memorable.. as he then backed off stage leaving us on stage with the band,there was a huge punch up between the Teds and bouncers...what a night!!

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