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No litter, no vandalism, no graffiti. Great days.

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Found a few more glass negatives for sale on ebay, with some good Nottstalgia material. This is the bottom of Beastmarket Hill; the Market Square is on the left, and the Tudor building is at the bott

On one of the ebay photos, there's a street name clearly in shot. The pub behind must be either the White Hart or Isaac Newton which have both been mentioned here at various times.

I'm glad I grabbed a copy of them before they disappeared. And of the ones not seen before............. if only the ring road at Middleton Boulevard was like this now.

The picture of the bus in Long Eaton appears in the book 'Barton Part One - 1908-1949' by Alan Oxley, published by Transport Publishing Company in 1983.

The caption to it includes:

'During 1925 Strachan & Brown bodied no. 27, a Morris 1-ton lorry chassis, extended to allow 24 seated passengers and incorporating the Barton patented third axle. It is seen in operation on a Saturday/Sunday only Spinney Road, Long Eaton to Old Sawley service...It is turning out of College Street into Derby Road, Long Eaton'

The photograph is credited to the Barton Transport Ltd collection.

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It's the good old days when everybody had a great time starving........my gran was born in 1888 and earned 5/6d a week for a 16 hour day when she left school at 13, she was in service and they were treated like dirt..........

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I lived on Park Street which is the street before College Street. At one time there was an old lady who ran the sweet shop on the corner you can see, she had lots of cats who sat on the counter and used to have to move them off the goods to get at them :)

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Come on Mick! Elvis is often seen in the supermarket. The Earth looks flat to me, I've never fell off. Don't know about the man in the moon. Did anybody ever go there to check it out. Lol.

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Going back to ebay, one of the other negatives for sale was this of Friar Lane. It's the offices of the Nottm Building Society, and continued as that until somewhere around the late 90s. The empty space on the right is where Toby's had not yet been built.

friar_zpsu9gizfcl.jpg

The building is still there today, as well as the one on the left; and the gap on the right has now been filled by the ex-Toby's.

friar1_zpst7aufb9j.jpg

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I don't understand much of the technicalities behind it, but it's a glass negative which was something used in early photography. They produced much higher quality results than film of the time, but they were very expensive and cumbersome.

People back then would never have dreamed how easy it would become to take a photo of anything, anywhere, anytime.

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The Nottingham building society is no,longer in that building, they closed it down about 5 years ago and moved everyone up to the upper parliament street branch and then they moved their head office to Huntingdon court on Mansfield rd

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A couple more from the same batch.

I'm fairly sure this is Parliament Street - judging by the route board on the side of the bus.

busparl_zps5qr3y8xk.jpg

And this is on the service from Nottingham to Derby. I can't decide exactly where, but in the background there appears to be a policeman on point duty in the middle of the road; that might be Lenton Boulevard / Derby Road.

bustrent_zpsezo8rwgt.jpg

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Re the first photo "White Bros" were hamper makers in 1927 , at 81 Parliament St . Furnishing retailers called Cooper and Foster at number 79 .

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Looking at the hampers stacked outside the shop just wondered what "Fred Clements" and "Sinbad" were selling .

Turns out Fred Clements must have been some sort of theatrical promoter who regularly put out a Sinbad the Sailor pantomime show . So those baskets would have originally been made for props I imagine .

There is also a hamper marked "Frank Pichel" ...he was also a variety artist described as a "comic acrobat" !

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The first photo appears in the book 'Nottingham City Transport' by F. P. Groves and rightly or wrongly the caption states:

'...a proud crew pose in front of their vehicle in Wollaton Street in 1927 - ...a double decker Dennis with a 50-seat body built by Short Bros. of Rochester, fitted with solid tyres as pneumatics were not yet standard for double-deck buses. The bus is on service H to Hucknall.'

The other photo is of Barton vehicle no. 24. Built in 1925 it was a Lancia, with chassis extended by Barton and the addition of a third axle allowing room for 39 seats.

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