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My daughter uses Macs because she is a designer and the Mac graphics packages seem to be 'industry standard'.  Also still true I believe that Macs are less subject to 'attack' by viruses etc..though seemingly not as invulnerable as they used to be.  Main issue with Macs is cost.. and they too have decided that nobody uses 'hard' storage anymore.  Main issue with Macs is cost.

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Catfan, with all due respects, read the article, you'll see where I'm coming from. The popup they keep sending has been "fixed" so when you click on the X, the normal way of refusing anything, MS Win1

The Windows that I liked the best was Windows XP. Everything seemed so easy to do.

Macs are no less vulnerable to attacks than any other computer, the real reason is that there are far more Windows machines out there and hackers target based on volume of users vs their rate of succe

I agree with you about the cost of Macs. I’m sure they could sell them cheaper but have no reason to whilst the demand is there. I’ve not looked at Microsoft for some years but I’m sure the system is now much better in order to compete with Apple. Most of my stuff is done on my iPad these days.

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I have played with computers since they used Bernoulli disks. Of all the systems I have used Linux, despite what the aficionados say, is not really a domestic system except for the most basic of tasks and Macs are outrageously overpriced for what is in reality pretty mundane performance - they do look good though!

 

Windows,  much maligned it's true, is a victim of its own versatility. With Windows the user can chop and change, add stuff etc. and generally mess it with it until it breaks, that's not so easy on the others.  There are three times more PC's than Macs so it's understandable there will more reported problems, there would be far fewer if users didn't think they knew better than MS and made changes and alterations to the system then suffered breakdowns of their own making.

 

Software and programs for Windows vastly outnumber the competition so it's easier to find stuff you want or need, often for free.

 

There's no denying there are more scams for Windows but in all my years of buggering about the only attack I've suffered is on my Linux server. Macs are just as vulnerable but less likely as there are fewer of them so bad boys don't normally bother.

 

The moral is obviously if it 'aint broke...

 

 

 

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Most people aren't computer buffs though. They just want to take it out of the box and use it for their particular applications. I'm typing this on a 2008 Mac desktop which has been totally trouble free. Being 'belts and braces' I have another Mac on my desk, a 2014 Mac mini coupled to a large HP monitor. Most of the time I use an iPad. Macs are incredibly user friendly for 'non-computer' people. 

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When I first tried Linux it was a black art but recent distributions are pop in the installation media and it works. Very little user input required. In fact as drivers for many common graphics and sound chips are included in the kernel, it’s easier than windows to get up and running with a working system. It is basically a unix operating system similar to macs and fundamentally more secure than windows has traditionally been. Many hardware manufacturers provide Linux drivers for their printers etc but I’d agree it can take some faffing where Windows tends to be a more friendly experience. However linux is much better in recent years and arguably if you’re prepared for a learning curve it’s fairly straightforward.

The fact windows more or less had the monopoly on personal computers was essential and made software easier to develop as they only had to worry about one platform.

I think the main objection to Microsoft by many is their spying on users. The latest news about windows 11 only working on certain new machines has done them no favours in the popularity stakes although their market share is such I don’t think Bill will be too worried.

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8 hours ago, letsavagoo said:

DJ360.

You could always get a usb external cd/dvd writer. I don’t know for sure but I think a new laptop with a dvd/cd writer will be hard to find.

 

Yep. Don't use a laptop.  Current PC has two DVD/CD drives, both still working, but I used to use Exact Audio Copy..which seems to have died recently...as has all Windows Media stuff.

One thing I do is make CDs for my ancient car. I presently have no burning software.

The other thing is that I use a CD recorder in my hi-fi system... mostly for 'digitising' vinyl. I then burn to CD on my CD Recorder.  Due to the extortionate cost of Recordable 'For Audio' CDs, I use a rewritable disc, then rip to my Hi Fi Server (Innuos Zen Mini)and re-use the disc.  For giving discs to friends, I have to use the 'For Audio' recordables, whereas when the PC would still copy and burn, I used to use a re-writable then copy to a blank standard Data Disc on the PC.

 

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Looks like it may well be Jim.  I'll have a proper look tomorrow when I'm more awake, but thanks.

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12 hours ago, DJ360 said:

Also still true I believe that Macs are less subject to 'attack' by viruses etc..though seemingly not as invulnerable as they used to be. 

Macs are no less vulnerable to attacks than any other computer, the real reason is that there are far more Windows machines out there and hackers target based on volume of users vs their rate of success.

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OK, I surrender.

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DJ.

You’ve lost me on the ‘for audio’ cd’s that are expensive.

A cd/dvd is a digital stream. If that stream is readable by your playback device there will be no difference in the quality of playback whatever the disc used. Am I misunderstanding something here.

Incidentally I have copies of Nero and another program I can’t recall the name of, InCd or similar. I’ll send you the disc if you want. There is a free program, Image burn which I use on Linux but think there is a windows version. Simple but works well.
I still have my Terratec 24/96 sound card and front panel mount box for digitising audio but it works best with windows 98. Came with some software to reduce hiss and pops from worn or early discs.

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3 hours ago, letsavagoo said:

You’ve lost me on the ‘for audio’ cd’s that are expensive.

 

It's not complicated. Most  (maybe all) CD recorders, intended for use in hi-fi systems, are configured such that they will not recognise a standard data disc, which costs roughly 5p.  They will only recognise 'For Audio' discs, which are exactly the same as data discs except that they carry some sort of 'flag' or 'code' which the CD recorder recognises. These typically cost around 50p each and are a more modern extension of the old idea of a 'Tape Levy'. which was attempted when the music industry was getting all exercised about 'Home Taping is Killing Music'.

Apart from the cost, these discs are getting harder to find, because fewer people are using CD Recorders.  The thing is that I mostly use my machine for recording from vinyl, for two purposes.

1. To make a CD copy to play in the car.

2. To make a CD to rip into my music server.

When my P.C. and Win7 were still working properly, I would make a CD from my recorder, but on a CD 'For Audio' Re-writable' disc, which cost a couple of quid each, and copy that to a common or garden data disc, using my P.C.

 

If you like, you could also consider this 'levy' as similar to the old 'regional' DVD players.  Most are multi-region nowadays I think, but in the early days when we sold DVD players out of Audio Excellence in Preston, they were single region.  We offered a service whereby our in house engineer would 'chip' the machines to make them multi region. Cost £50.

 

I've often wondered if my CD recorder, (Yamaha CDR HD-1500) is also capable of being 'chipped' to make it recognise plain data discs.. but I've had no luck so far.

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I'm having a problem trying to organise some music to play in my car. All I've got is a dab radio and a USB socket. I thought all I had to do was load some mp3s onto a flash stick and it would play like my previous car. But no joy, the screen just tell me no signal or not recognised. Tried mp3 and wav but to no avail. Must be doing summat wrong.

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Yes CF. Don't know what else to try. Can't even find how to switch the radio off ! When I rang the salesman he said just turned the volume right down. (I've just put it on mute, can't find an off/on switch.

 

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