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It’s not a fear of officialdom monitoring me doins,  it’s the fact there are those who can and do manipulate the more easliy persuaded in  a relentless pursuit of profit. We can say it doesn’t affect us but it does even, if it’s subliminal.

Who knows how far it will go in the future?

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Catfan, with all due respects, read the article, you'll see where I'm coming from. The popup they keep sending has been "fixed" so when you click on the X, the normal way of refusing anything, MS Win1

I see Microsoft being sued over this issue, a Lawyer could retire after suing a case like this, I'd say this stupidity, or rather greed, could well end up with Microsoft going bankrupt. All that is ne

With all new versions of Widows it's best to let the dust settle before upgrading. If your PC still works most likely many of your programs won't.

‘Spying’ on your online activities comes from various sources. You’re browser, search engine, anti virus monitoring. Ditching Google for something like Duck Duck Go is a start. Always reject cookies except essential ones. Subscribe to a vpn service. 
I met someone a while back and agreed to send them some information. I took their phone number and entered it in my mobile. Within hours I was getting them as ‘people you may know’ on Facebook. I’d not called them or even put their name in the phone, just the number. 
I’m a bit sceptical that Alexa listens to you when not activated but if I was planning to Rob a bank wouldn’t have Alexa anywhere near me.

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1 hour ago, letsavagoo said:

Ditching Google for something like Duck Duck Go is a start. Always reject cookies except essential ones. Subscribe to a vpn service. 

 

All good advice and I've done all that...but  Duck Duck is quite frankly not very good, even when coupled with the Epic browser.  The best of VPN's will  slow the PC down (I've tried both free and paid for).

All cookies are rejected and deleted when closing the browser.

Try as we might I don't think the constant battle can be won by individuals when pitted against an army of specialists and yes, I have a Canute complex..  :rolleyes:

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Tried to upgrade... it crashed but before it did it buggered MS Edge and some other gubbins. Opening Edge will bring blue screen crash, so will opening a PDF file. It takes a day to reinstall my machine so I'll wait until I get a roundtuit

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I use Linux to manage and maintain my server based in Strasbourg, it runs on Centos and the command line interface  is fiendishly difficult. It's for games, website, forum and database.

 

My home system is Windows because like thousands of others I'm an avid game player and gaming on a Mac is very much the poor relation to Windows,Windows is also far more configurable than a Mac which is part curse, part blessing.

You've said many time Macs are more user friendly, I disagree but it's a personal preference and what the user is used to.

The outrageous cost of Macs i also a factor. Linux - free, Windows server - £300. MacServer - almost £2000

 

Millions of home computer users can't be wrong!   ;)

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3 hours ago, Brew said:

But it don't do what Windows do, and Linux does even less!

You may have a point, but just speaking for myself it does everything I bother to do these days.  Quickly, smoothly, without bugs, and all in a windows like environment which I was used to.  It can even run some of my older windows software just as quickly.  Tells you when updates are available and doesn't nag you about them if you choose not to instal them.

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Exactly that. I've always been a Mac user ever since they produced Visicalc, the very first spread sheet program, and I've stuck with them as they are very intuitive. I've toyed with pc's but don't find them as user friendly. As for cars, you name it, I've had it. They're all pretty good now. The days of the lemons are over. My last unreliable car was a Jag but my wife's Jag (different model) has been perfect. I'll lease the next time I change so the problems will be someone else's. I used to enjoy working on cars but there's nothing you can do now other than check tyres, oil and water and even those I can read off on my smartphone.

 

 

 

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HEH... you've got the MercedesMe app... and no I don't have a pad of any description. I may be a PC addict but at least when a I walk away from my desk I don't carry it around with me and strangely I'm not even tempted.

 

I did vaguely consider one when I fancied the SkyDemon app but there's not a lot of room in a Cessna so didn't bother.

 

LL your right, a friend of mine learnt in a Vauxhall and for the last 40+ yrs has driven nothing else, even when they were the worlds worst rot boxes he remained faithful

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I learnt in a Vauxhall Victor in 1960. Front bench seat and three speed column change. I'm  just teaching my daughter to drive (she's having proper lessons as well) in a Jeep Renegade with a six speed box. It's interesting for me after having autos for years. I'm getting quite good at my racing changes! Who really wants to drive a manual though?

 

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Going back to the Windows question, I’m holding back on Win11 on the laptop. It’s not the newest and struggles a bit with Win10.

 

I dug out my 14 year old desktop PC from the loft the other day. Last used 8 years ago, 4gig memory and 160gig hard drive, and has XP on it. It was intended to go to the dump, but I thought I’d try reviving it. Despite its age and lack of use, it’s now purring along nicely using Ubuntu. The XP is still installed on the hard drive, which means I can access all my old pictures, music, etc, but once I can move them all over to Ubuntu, I’ll be deleting Windows.

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I used to run Microsoft Flight simulator but no longer have a pc. Speaking with a friend who has a full works simulator set up the latest MS stuff is fantastic. I’ve never flown a Jodel in real life but I have got a few hours in on Cessna 172’s. Most of my ‘real’ flying  was in PA 28 Cherokees and a Grumman AA5 Traveller plus a bit on Chipmunks. I keep meaning to take it up again if I could pass the medical. It was £9 an hour when I first learnt to fly!

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On 12/2/2021 at 6:51 PM, philmayfield said:

I learnt in a Vauxhall Victor in 1960. Front bench seat and three speed column change.

 

This reminded me of an experience years ago. My in laws were friends with a lovely couple, Gladys and Ernie. All their money went into a static caravan on a site near Mablethorpe were Ernie could fish and every weekend they would go Friday night to Sunday. Ernie was about 5’3” tall and drove a Ford Zepher with the bench seat. He drove by peering through the gap between the dashboard and steering wheel. It was his pride and joy and polished inside and out. He gave me a lift one time and on the bends we would slide sidewise on the seat. Ernie could hold the steering wheel but I practically ended up on his knee a few times on sharp lefts. 

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