A few random photos - 2


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Ian, 

Don't forget the Forest Hospital on Southwell Rd Mansfield, know locally as the "Fever Hospital" or the Ransom Hospital, below, nearer Rainworth It was called Ransom Sanitorium, it too had patients in beds on the verandahs.

ransomwood-our-history-content-image.jpg

 

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For those seeking an alternative to politics......... Long Row in 1970. The top of Maid Marian Way, the rear of the old ABC cinema just visible on the right. St Peter's Square

I go on a gardening web site where at the moment they are on about Pugh-Ernly- Whippingstool and his programme to try and stop child obesity.   They didn't think much to my comments of feed

Met Mrs PP there.....remember her skipping off the floor after a dance and I thought, hey! she's something special. Could not believe my luck when she asked me to dance for the ladies excuse me. She s

20 minutes ago, jonab said:

The Harlow Wood picture reminded me of Newstead Sanitorium/Hospital (very close to Harlow Wood) which specialised in TB treatment and where my Dad was a patient in the 1950's. At Newstead, not only did they have the beds outside in good weather but also seemed to have the big windows open all year round. Saved on heating bills, I suppose.

 

This was in the early days of treatment with streptomycin, PAS, INH and they worked.

 

I remember giving the streptomycin injections - it was not pleasant for the children as it was a very thick liquid and had to be injected slowly, also the oral meds you mention were like horse tablets - very big!  

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17 minutes ago, MargieH said:

 

I remember giving the streptomycin injections - it was not pleasant for the children as it was a very thick liquid and had to be injected slowly, also the oral meds you mention were like horse tablets - very big!  

The PAS had to be continued for several years after the hospital discharge and they were, indeed, like horse tablets but they were cachets made of rice paper (a bit like sherbet flying saucers) which were dipped in water before swallowing. The timing of the dip was crucial so that the cachet was soft enough to swallow but robust enough not to fall apart before it could be got into the mouth. Apparently, the PAS tasted foul but one side effect it did have - which affected all those around the patient was that it caused very severe smelly wind.

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I never noticed the smelly wind - perhaps I wasn't around at the right time (although I did have to do the bedpan round for those who were on bedrest)

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Never had much to do with ambulances or their bllankets, Ian, so no idea what colour they were...

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I remember it well. I was a regular visitor to Forest Dene every winter with a hacking cough.

 

Forest Dene was a lovely building and, I think, should have been left alone. On the opposite corner were the prison railings of The  Manning Penitentiary for Silly Girls too dim to fail their 11 plus exam! Yes, NBL, my alma mater or my nemesis, for want of a better description!

 

You won't find me lamenting its obliteration!

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I had a course of sunlamp treatment, don't know what for but can remember sitting in a circle on the floor in my shreddies with other kids. Dark glasses on and an attendant nurse to make sure they stayed on until the lamp was switched off.

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1 hour ago, IAN123. said:

In the early 70's i passed the TB test..no dots or rash on arm/ wrist?

Into Forest Dene on the Monday morning..chest xray ..breathe in and hold.

 

I think the Mantoux test for TB (the little circle of dots you mentioned ) did react positively for you, Ian...as it did  for me.  That"s why you had to go for a chest x-ray to find out if the TB was still active .... I had to have an X-ray as well.

If the Mantoux test DIDN'T react that meant that you needed the TB vaccine to give you immunity..

 

Apparently many children acquired  immunity to TB by being exposed to it naturally.

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NBL, sunlight was part of the treatment for TB....  or I suppose in your case it could have been tried as a preventative measure?

TB  was treated by rest, fresh air/sunlight, good healthy food and, in severe cases, 3 drugs including streptomycin injections over a couple of years.

 

 

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I had two jabs, still got little scars too, probably because the scabs came off loads of times in Arnold Baths as I went swimming several times a week in those days!

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11 hours ago, NewBasfordlad said:

shreddies with other kids. Dark glasses on and an attendant nurse to make sure they stayed on until the lamp was switched off.

Didn't they recommend sun lamp treatment for rickets or vit D deficiency?  My grandmother, apparently, had some light treatment at the clinic next to Hyson Green library in the 1930s but for what reason I don't know.

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12 hours ago, IAN123. said:

How the hell did I escape the jab?... I fell into none of those categories!

 

Your test must have reacted, Ian, for you to have been sent for a chest X-ray!  Perhaps it reacted so discreetly that you didn't see the dots clearly (but the nurse/doctor must have seen them)

 

2 hours ago, Jill Sparrow said:

Didn't they recommend sun lamp treatment for rickets or vit D deficiency?  My grandmother, apparently, had some light treatment at the clinic next to Hyson Green library in the 1930s but for what reason I don't know.

 

Yes, Jill,  sunlight therapy could also have been used as a preventative measure against rickets, as one's body makes vitamin D when large areas of skin are exposed to UVB rays

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^^^^^^^^They certainly were Ian and still are despite all the problems.

 

To some extent they are the victims of their own success to put it crudely folks aren't dying like they used to.

 

I have just watched the BBC programme on the Queens Med and some of the things they can do now leave me gob smacked, growing a woman a new jaw, straightening spines the list goes on.

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I remember one of the surgeons saying 'we could not have done this 15 years ago, maybe not even 10 years ago' which to me says it all.

 

Every year their expertise improves and they will need more money but where that comes from I don't know. However one of the things that shone through was the lack of 'care in the community' on one occasion there were 295 beds blocked across the trust by elderly people who were fit enough to go home but would need care when they got there and there was none available.

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