Victoria Station & Great Central


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  • 10 years later...

The latest issue of the magazine 'Steam Days' (September issue) arrived in the post today, and although I haven't read it yet what looks well worth checking out is an article 'The Last Weekend of the Great Central's London Extension' by a David Pearce. 

Several good photos of Victoria Station are included along with some at Wilford and the bridge over the Trent. Also a good map centring on the GC line through West Bridgford.  The article seems to consist of memories of someone who lived in sight of the line there.

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  • 2 months later...

I purchased it MI, and didn't learn much I didn't already know. However, some of the pictures were new to me. Quite a good read all the same. A bit on the GC is better than nothing at all.

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Yes, it was a good article seen through the eyes of a local lad whose house overlooked the GC through Wilford.

A favourite haunt of mine during the same period.

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  • 6 months later...

When I was about 8, and at Patrick Road WB infants' school, the GC embankment was on a level with the upper floor classrooms. That, plus when our family moved to Colwick, we lived in a cul-de-sac with the LNER(?) and Midland lines at the end of the road, is why I love steam trains to this day.

 

On a tangent, I have spent the last year trying to stop the Education Funding Agency from knocking down an Edwardian school with far better architecture than Patrick Road - no justice!!

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On 13/05/2017 at 11:38 PM, LongJohn said:

When I was about 8, and at Patrick Road WB infants' school, the GC embankment was on a level with the upper floor classrooms.

 

And this (I think) might be the closest you'll get now as a reminder of what you are referring to. The school is in the background beyond the tunnel which goes under the railway line. The embankment is now cleared and replaced by housing.

NMtqDwY.jpg

 

And I think the line was not the GC; it was the Midland line to London via Melton.

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Cliff Ton: you are a star! When I was in WB a couple of weeks ago, and walking along Rectory Road, it was obvious where that embankment had been. In your photo, the building you can half see in the foreground was a sweet shop. Yet sweets only came off ration in '53.

 

You are right about the line.

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  • 3 months later...
  • 2 months later...
  • 2 months later...

As Wembley was nearest to the ex GC main line, it was always favourite for special trains to use that route. 

Always a good chance of seeing some rare locos on them too. 

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Nah mate never went to the Zoo with Gussies .............I suspect that in my day you (the school that is)  couldn't ask folk for the money for the trip with voluntary or otherwise contribution. My recollections of steam train jaunts was the weekend ramblers trains from Victoria Stn out to Derbyshire in the mid 60s........ Lovely

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  • 6 months later...

.....and a few more. Who can forget the stairs leading down to Great Central island platforms?!

 

29480293271_7f0ee49c3e_b.jpg

 

The Signalbox

 

29560881905_80a0600231_b.jpg

 

The workshop

 

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Nice signage:

 

29527236706_47377a29fe_b.jpg

 

Who are you calling "Big nose?"

 

29480416641_4cea81e705_b.jpg

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Great stuff Compo. We often have a drive down to Rothley on  a Sunday morning. Park at  the station, coffee and a bacon cob. Followed by a walk to Swithland reservoir, through the next village and back to Rothley for a tea and cake session. 

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I visited the station with my brother and his wife back in September 2016. His wife was not interested in trains but when we got there she was taken aback and enthralled by the variety of stuff and the memories it triggered for her- which was nice.

 

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My neighbour, down the lane, Bill Brazier, (formerley of the ‘Fabulous Beatmen’ many years ago) is a regular driver on the Great Central. I remember years ago when he joined as a fireman and took the necessary tests to work up to driver. He used to drive on the Bluebell railway as well. Coincidentally  we were at Mellish together but he’s three years older than me. He does have to take an annual medical to qualify but it’s very similar to the HGV one.

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13 hours ago, Deepdene Boy said:

They'll have to finish mending Tornado first.

It seems like Tornado is now back together. They have announced five runs between Edinburgh and Aberdeen for next year - this may be my chance to see it in action.

 

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Like the Flying Scotsman Tornado's sound is all different to some of the old loco's that are preserved and what I remember of steam when they were running on the mainline, I think it must be something to do with the boilers being welded as opposed to being riveted, they seem to lack that whoomph when pulling away, a much more subdued sound, a welded boiler can't expand and contract like a riveted one, they seem more tame somehow, they still have all the power but sound different, let me know what you think after you've heard it

 

Rog

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One of the most depressing places I have ever visited - the area surrounding Blaenau Ffestiniog. It's grey and grey and more grey. Every time I've been there the colour of the sky has matched the slate spoil heaps - grey and it's very often foggy as well. If you ever find yourself there, get on the train and escape as fast as you can. The town itself is not too bad, it's the surrounding area. Make sure you're well topped up with Prozac before you go.

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Have to agree jonab and the natives are not too friendly either. My son and his classmates spent a week as volunteers working in the morning on the railway and free in the afternoon. They couldn't go anywhere after lunch without being attacked and chased away by Welsh speaking yobs.

When I went to collect him and went for something to eat there was a sudden silence when we entered the café and it was more than obvious we were not welcome.

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