nonnaB

Recipe exchange

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I'm going to a memorial service this afternoon, with food to follow. There will be a big crowd, and many are bringing a dish to share. I've made this to take, but I've tripled the recipe. 

 

CREAMY CUCUMBER SALAD

1 cup sour cream

2 tablespoons white vinegar [I used white wine vinegar]

1/4 cup sugar

1 teaspoon dried dill weed

salt and pepper to taste.

 

Whisk all these ingredients together.

 

Peel and thinly slice 1 large English cucumber [or 2 American [smaller and fatter]]

Skin and thinly slice 1 red onion

Pour sour cream mix over cucumber and onion, stir to cover everything. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.  

 

A great side dish. 

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That's going on my list to do Katyjay,sounds lovely, thanks

 

Rog

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Our friend Mary from Edinburgh is coming to stay with us for a few weeks and she is gluten intolerant,does anyone have any recipes for gluten free lemon curd or jam tarts,yorkshire puds,sponge cakes etc,I have tried using gluten free flour to make some lemon curd tarts as a  practice but when I roll out the pastry it is very flaky,I use 4 oz plain flour (gluten free) 2 oz margerine,pinch salt and 3 tablespoons cold water but as I said the pastry is very flaky and hard to work with,any help will be appreciated

 

Rog

 

ps,The ones I have made have just come out the oven and the pastry seems quite hard

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Tesco does a ready-to-roll block of pastry, gluten free. Might help you a bit.

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Thanks Katy, that'll do for me,I should imagine for the Yorkshire pudding mix just substitute plain flour for this gluten free flour so should be all sorted for when she arrives

 

Rog

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Just made Mrs P some spinach and feta turnovers for her lunch

P1060293.jpg

puff pastry,wilted spinach,crumbled feta, in the oven for 20 minutes,these have just come out the oven and smell lovely

P1060294.jpg

on her plate with some potato salad, saved some salad and spinach and feta turnovers for tomorrows tea for her,  (points in the bag Rog,points in the bag)

 

Rog

 

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Down at the village coffee morning in Bassingham today I was asked if I'm going to bake a cake for the Macmillan appeal,they are having a cake sale next Monday and instead of the money's going to the "friends of Bassingham" it will go to the Macmillan appeal instead, think I will bake a lemon or orange drizzle cake with wiskey added to the drizzle,what do you think?

 

Rog

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I have been using Gluten Free sausage meat to stuff the marrows.

Fry off a large onion in butter..until transparent..add wine to strip the pan..then add sausage meat..some sage..pinch of thyme and fry until cooked but not browned..i add YR brown sauce..but HP is fine..and also the water from a tin of sweetcorn..optional but i fold in half a packet of country stuffing...pack filling into the hollowed out and peeled marrow halfs.Place in oven ..loosely wrapped in tinfoil in a meat tin..with water..and a drop of cooking wine..medium oven for about an hour.

Serve with creamy mash and a cheeky white vino.

Seasoning to suit ..as preferred.

Bon Appètit.

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The other day talking to my neighbour we got talking about garden plants. They have 4 huge lemon trees in plant pots and during this time of the year I can be sure that she hands me a few. She invited me to go and look at them. ( in the winter they go into the garage out of the frost and ice) When I got there I was amazed at the amount of lemons they had produced this year. She had a basket ready and proceeded to cut off some lemons for me. They were small ones but so full of juice. I took off the zest and put them into 96% alcohol to macerate for a week when I will strain them and make some Limoncello and Limoncello cream. I have a small jar macerating to make lemon extract and another small jar under salt to preserve them. ( never preserved them like this before but it will be interesting to see the result) The rest of the lemons are in the fridge and the whole litre of juice is in the freezer. Now next Tuesday will be bottling day.

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I think it's a good year generally for citrus fruits at the latitude we live, Brenda. The orange crops here are enormous so it will be a busy Fete de L’Oranger at Easter. Is it global warming, I wonder?

https://www.google.com/search?q=easter+festival,+bar+sur+loup&rlz=1C1CHBF_en-GBGB867GB867&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=IJSa4OCZuknhpM%3A%2C3IOBNuKKPVCDbM%2C_&vet=1&usg=AI4_-kSXQ6vhzZQGzBFz-u1AHKOFVW405g&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjmkKqhh7_nAhUGTxUIHc-TDXgQ9QEwAXoECAkQBw#imgrc=IJSa4OCZuknhpM:

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Some cracking pictures Jonab, is that where you reside?

PS, why is the bloke peeling oranges and hanging the skins on a line?

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That is where I live, Beekay. My villa appears on several published pictures of le BsL. I'm not going to locate it precisely as I did that once and was then deluged with visits from all sorts of undesirables - not that I'm saying Nottstalgians are undesirables but this forum is open to public scrutiny.

 

The peel is the most valuable part of the oranges that are grown here. They aren't sweet to eat - they are called Bigarades, very similar to Seville oranges used for marmalade. An explanation of the uses of the oranges is given in this article https://loumessugo.com/orange-festival-on-the-french-riviera-la-fete-de-l-oranger/ (which, incidentally, I had a part in writing). The juice isn't wasted, it makes a very nice, very alcoholic 'wine'.

 

Almost all of the dried peel is used in making Cointreau, Grand Marnier and Triple Sec where is it the major flavouring agent and in loads of other drinks where it forms part of the overall bouquet.

 

Oranges aren't the only crops here. There are a number of vineyards and lots of fields of plants used in perfumery and flavours (Grasse, the worldwide centre of the perfume and flavour industry is only a few Km away and is where I used to work and how I came to live here).

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Beekay, there are loads of things in foreign parts that have you wondering. dried tomatoes are a thing I learned years ago, in Sicily especially in the villages you see long planks covered in half tomatoes that are drying outside. They are cut in half covered in salt and left to drain and eventually dryout ready to save in jars for aperatives or whateverThey also make tomato puree in the same way. This way everything tastes better. Pity we can't do these things in the north although I have tried fairly successfully but the sun isn't as strong as it is in Sicily.. 

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Jonab, Think those oranges are the same as they are here and they are called Chinotto . It must be a lovely festival to see. WE have the wine festival in May and you have your orange festival at easter. We have Carnival coming up and at the moment we have the San Remo song festival.

My lemon trees have TWO lemons on them, but they are only young and one of them ( tree) has had a bit of a rough time.They are still covered over from winter, the weather some days is like an early summer and others we fear a severe frost.

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Thank you Nonna and Jonab, for your insight into oranges.

Nonna, how's your cactus doing?

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The big one is fine , maybe got a bit of frost bite but the others ( gggchildren;)) are still in the shed out of the frosty mornings.

 

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Brenda, I was going to ask about your lemon tree. I assume it is the same one as last year whose leaves dropped off just after you acquired it.

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Yes it is the same one but the leaves dropped off after it had been through the winter but it recovered very quickly. Last year I bought 2 more twigs from Lidl. They were only €1.99 so I thought if they die off I haven't lost much. Well they are flourishing. They are still wrapped up but through the cover I can see they are ok. Can't see though if they have any blossom or not. One is a Mayer lemon so interested to see the difference.

Must go to shake my lemon peels in alcohol. It has to be done everyday and sometimes I forget. "Alexa remind me to shake my lemon peels"

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That could come across as soon sort of euphemism Nonna !

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I am not going to make any comment about shaking NonnaBs lemons.

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Waldo & Trogg. After thought......shouldn't have written that and expected some reaction. :Shock: Lemons in alcohol need to be shaken every day so they release all the whatever you call it, perfume, essence etc. :wacko: just the smell is inviting. Can't wait to finish it off with Limoncello and Limoncello cream. Shall have to watch what I write in future. smile2

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mmmmm Limoncello got a taste for it when I was in Italy last year:biggrin:

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