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I never had elocution lessons at Arno Vale - obviously I wasn't posh enough...  

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I never had elocution lessons either Margie ......... although at the first Parents Evening at C-Le-W my English teacher Mr Knowles, told my parents he thought I’d had elocution lessons!   Crikey, were they proud!  That posh talk soon got knocked out of me at Grammar School though :wacko:

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I learned Australian in 79, they called it "Strine". My teacher was a fellow electrician who corrected me often, until I got the hang of it....LOL

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5 hours ago, IAN123. said:

Beaut Oz..me duck.

Never knew you were bilingual Ian. That must be a first Nottinghamese and Strine in one sentence

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ill gotten-gains,   just sayin.

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Thanks for putting me straight. I'd never heard the word gotten( obviously haven't lived) until I had a penfriend and she always used it. Oh well you live and learn.

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Americanism or not, in many instances of its usage, it's not necessary and neither is 'got'.

 

(Note my use of, and lack of use of, the apostrophe with the words spelled with the letters i, t and s.)

 

(Note also my use of 'spelled' rather than 'spelt' - which, to me, is a type of ancient wheat - and I strongly object to my spill chucker telling me I'm wrong in this.)

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Not about to discuss religion, just the word 'Gotten'. I believe it is used a lot in the Bible. 

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I use spelt often. Wen i mek bred

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Many of the "shortened" words we use today, didn't exist just over 100 years ago, like "couldn't, can't" etc, even the movie makers making westerns now use the correct English of the day.

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I know we are now straying away from the title subject but, a recent dreadful usage I have noticed recently in the British press and TV is the word 'pled' when what is actually meant is 'pleaded'.

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It is terrible here..Dove for dived.

Another pearler is "next Sunday"..not tomorrow- i turned up one week early for a job interview with that one.

Next Tuesday fortnight is another perplexer!

 

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1 hour ago, jonab said:

I know we are now straying away from the title subject but, a recent dreadful usage I have noticed recently in the British press and TV is the word 'pled' when what is actually meant is 'pleaded'.

Alas, most people in this country have been seduced by Americanisms. I try to maintain my vigilance against it. I would rather resort to the middle English of Chaucer than follow their lead.

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15 minutes ago, Jill Sparrow said:

Alas, most people in this country have been seduced by Americanisms. I try to maintain my vigilance against it. I would rather resort to the middle English of Chaucer than follow their lead.

Whan that  Aprille with his shoures shoote? Really - in Mansfield Market - c’m on! :(

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17 hours ago, MargieH said:

I never had elocution lessons at Arno Vale - obviously I wasn't posh enough...  

I’m sure you never needed to Margie. Arno Vale was in Woodthorpe, we all talked posh there. 

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I don't talk posh, do I?   Oh, I forgot .....you wouldn't know, would you Phil, as I've not seen you for nearly 66 years!   

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4 hours ago, carni said:

Not about to discuss religion, just the word 'Gotten'. I believe it is used a lot in the Bible. 

That's 'begotten' Carni...

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9 minutes ago, MargieH said:

I don't talk posh, do I?   Oh, I forgot .....you wouldn't know, would you Phil, as I've not seen you for nearly 66 years!   

 

You’ve probably picked up the Lincolnshire/Fenland brogue. It’s quite similar round here in the indigenous agricultural communities. Can’t understand a bloody word they say! It’s all oo’s and arr’s. I unconsciously adjust my speaking to the people I’m with. I suppose that can be deemed to be condescending but I think you’ve got to be at ease with people and don’t come over as a pompous bastard (which has been said!)

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1 hour ago, IAN123. said:

It is terrible here..Dove for dived.

 

 

....but we say 'drive' and 'drove'    Our English language has some strange rules, or rather the exceptions to those rules

 

e g. 'sit' and 'sat'  but not 'knit' and ' Knat'.     Fascinating stuff....

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You will never see "pled" in our stateside media, but plead, which can be read as "pleed or pled" as in lead, as in dog lead and lead, as in lead the metal.

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Again Dove as in dived, derives from the old English that American's kept. It was we Brits that changed "dove" to dived.

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Ha, this reminds me of my topic on words with multiple meanings, but spelt (Or is it spelled) the same.

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