DJ360

How's your day?

Recommended Posts

How's  my day? Just back from the dentist, after what she calls ' a deep clean'. Thought she were going to numb it, but no, went straight in with the pick axe and plough share, ( at least it felt like it !). Thankfully Mrs.Beekay had prepared lunch so I  had creamy mash potatoes and gravy, so all's well. Off to work at the hospital coffee shop. If anybody offers me a biscuit I'll  scream.  :rolleyes:

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carni an earlier post of yours regarding what you were reading by Philippe Gregory, when my cousins were here from Australia a while ago they left me a book by this author and I thought, " no don't think I'm going to read that" . I felt as though I was being a bit ungrateful not even trying to read it but I started on it and have problems putting it down. It's a thick book called "Three sisters and Three queens"

Ive never been into reading history about royalty and didn't think it would hold me for long. But I'm hooked, it's written like a diary but the base is true. It's the story of Henry 8th and his 3 sisters. Katherine of Aragon ( who married Henry's elder brother Arthur and who died in young age) then married Henry. Margaret who became Queen of Scotland and Mary the youngest who becomes Queen of France.

The book is written as if Margaret is writing her diary. She married at 12 yrs of age had her first child at 13. Wow thank goodness things have changed, they were old at 30.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Beekay said:

How's  my day? Just back from the dentist, after what she calls ' a deep clean'. Thought she were going to numb it, but no, went straight in with the pick axe and plough share, ( at least it felt like it !). Thankfully Mrs.Beekay had prepared lunch so I  had creamy mash potatoes and gravy, so all's well. Off to work at the hospital coffee shop. If anybody offers me a biscuit I'll  scream.  :rolleyes:

Maybe even a broken biscuit  Beekay  save you having to chomp it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nonna, here are some othe Phillipa Gregory titles that Mrs.Beekay highly recommends,

The White Queen,

The Red Queen,

The Bolynne Girl,

The Other Bolynne Girl,

Regards, B.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, nonnaB said:

they were old at 30.

Nonna, from what I have learnt through reading 'The King Makers Daughters', it seems they are lucky to make it to 30. They may be royalty but would  have their own family members executed to get at their wealth and lands. I have about a third of the book left to read, but I will definitely look out for the titles Beekay has mentioned. Phillipa Gregory is a brilliant writer,  she has gained a new fan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for those kind words Mary, does that mean we're back on dunkin biscuits?

Got to work and just my bloody luck ! On my own again as nobody turned in. It's  been manic, I'd  swear it was tourist buses turning up and all wanted tea or coffee. Made mesen a cup of tea at 2.45, it was still there at 5.00, (home time). No bu**er offered me a biscuit, so no Custard Scream.

Ps. Bought meself a Wagon Wheel, can you dunk them?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My last few days have been mostly concerned with the garden.  I've cleared the whole of one corner which was getting too overgrown.  It's also always been a problem, because it faces North and East, plus being overshadowed by next door's enormous Laburnum.  They announced a week or so back that they are having the Laburnum cut down, so that should mean more light and more water for my own stuff.

 

I've moved quite a few plants about and prepared the ground for planting things like Japanese Anemone's and other stuff that can tolerate a bit of shade.  I've put in 4Kg of assorted Narcissus bulbs for the spring, but I'm trying to plant stuff that will grow up to hide the Narcissus leaves after they've flowered.   I've got loads of Aquilegia grown from seed. They can cope with light shade.  I've also got loads of more 'exotic' Narcissus, like pure white varieties etc.  Also about 50 Alliums and 100 or so Tulips.  Also some Anemone De Caen and Fritillarias. The Tulips especially are likely to get 'binned' after flowering, as they never seem to do as well in the second year and they're cheap enough to treat as 'annuals'.  Even Monty Don does that...    I also have a problem with moss growing on the soil surface in that part of the garden.  I'm going to try mulching it with bark or somesuch when it's planted up.

Been lugging bags of compost and grit from the garden centre, because I'm putting loads of bulbs in containers too.

If I can get all of the above sorted out, I can move on to some stuff that needs doing inside the house.  Mostly painting...  Deep Joy...  :(

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a test for you DJ360 must admit wish i still had my garden  miss it, it's like not having a right arm, having said that i would find it a problem to garden any more, just tub's and container's now. When we lived at Anderby village we had very sandy soil, is it same were you are?:Friends:

ps do you live in Linc's or Lanc's if it's Lanc's them I'm sure your soil will not be sandy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Beekay said:

Thank you for those kind words Mary, does that mean we're back on dunkin biscuits?

Got to work and just my bloody luck ! On my own again as nobody turned in. It's  been manic, I'd  swear it was tourist buses turning up and all wanted tea or coffee. Made mesen a cup of tea at 2.45, it was still there at 5.00, (home time). No bu**er offered me a biscuit, so no Custard Scream.

Ps. Bought meself a Wagon Wheel, can you dunk them?

Hi Beekay sorry don't eat bic'cis my love is mar's bar's each morning before we stated work we (I mean all the staff of 4) would always have a mar's bar. I bet when I retired the sale's of mar's fell.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What we tend to do when having a Mars bar is to slice it like a loaf then keep it in the fridge. Being a diabetic, I  shouldn't  really eat them, but my surgery nurse said if I  want one, I  can, but remember I've  had it and not have another next day. Tina and I just have a slice as a treat when watching tv. She says she couldn't  eat a whole as they're  too sickly sweet.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

B, you can still get those packets of mini Mars bars I think, or there's certainly a different manufacturers equivalent, and most likely cheaper, which is a bonus no doubt !

You can push the boat out then, and have half each ! smile2

My current treat for the weekend is a toffee cheesecake, and a caramel tart..... Not for consumption on the same day I might add ! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fly, I  would kill for caramel tart ! Nearest I've  seen is millionaires shortbread, although I  realise it's  not quite the same thing. Had my wagon wheel treat last night. We sell them at the coffee shop and every buyer to a man always say " they used to be a lot bigger" . Now you've  set me craving caramel tart, (used to make it in school kitchen but it was called 'Gypsy tart' but the pc brigade got in and we had to change the name, ( Ticehurst Tart).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, mary1947 said:

It's a test for you DJ360 must admit wish i still had my garden  miss it, it's like not having a right arm, having said that i would find it a problem to garden any more, just tub's and container's now. When we lived at Anderby village we had very sandy soil, is it same were you are?:Friends:

ps do you live in Linc's or Lanc's if it's Lanc's them I'm sure your soil will not be sandy. 

 

Hi Mary,

I live in what was Lancs, but is now technically Merseyside.  We are in St Helens Borough, which along with Knowsley, (Kirkby, Huyton, Halewood etc.) Halton (Widnes), Wirral, (Birkenhead etc) Sefton (Bootle to Southport) and Liverpool itself, all form Greater Merseyside. 

Although I can see Liverpool and beyond from here, we are about 15 miles from the centre and surrounded by farmland. We are only a few hundred yards from the borders of Greater Manchester, and East Lancashire.  Being on a ridge which connects Ashurst Beacon above Skelmersdale, Parbold Hill and our own Billinge Beacon, we have easy access to great views in all directions.

 

Not sure how I'd describe our soil.  It is sort of sandy but the sand is very fine and the soil is quite sticky when wet, and hard when dry.  I've seen much worse though.

This year, I've also declared war on several shrubs. Big Buddleia Globosa an the back fence is a useful screen from the 'Glums' who live behind us, but does need keeping in check like all Buddleias.. It's a balancing act.  A large Fuschia Riccartonnii causes endles rows between me and Mrs Col. Everytime I prune it I get accused of 'killing' it.  I reckon I've 'killed' it about ten times now and it keeps bouncing back.  Same applies to a Callicarpa, and Hibiscus which would each take over the border if left to themselves.  Mrs C doesn't seem to 'get' this. Still.. it's only a garden.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can get a cheaper  Mars at may i say it "Morrison's must say they are quite good.

 

DJ360 Its not just a garden it's your own little bit of our English soil (make the most of it for Boris takes it off you ) I 'm with Mrs C leave the poor Fuchsia and let it grow, but like you say it come's back each year. If you want to keep Mrs C happy treat her to a Fuchsia called Tom Thumb they are a small and compact Fuchsia. I'm sure she would like it. It doe's sound like your soil is the clay type which you can grow quite a lot of thing's in. It also sounds lovely where you live, we too had a nice house with a large garden but due to age, illness  (master had heart attack) we sold up and now live  in a bungalow which is owned by Anchor Association. We do have gardners but i have got my own little plot and share a greenhouse with my neighbour. Must admit it's quite enough. The thing is when we sold up with master feeling a lot better, we gave the kids their inheritance put something in the bank for the grand-kids, then took off around the world in fact we went twice, I'm glad we did it while we were able and we enjoyed our money, don't get me wrong not every body wants to do this.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My son and partner lost their holiday not long ago when the airline folded, but thankfully they got all their money back. As expected a lot of flights and holiday destinations upped their prices making it difficult for people on a tight budget to find alternatives.  They found a caravan holiday just outside Newquay Cornwall for a week, and a flight. The bit that amazes me is that they left Birmingham at 7am and just 40mins later arrived at Newquay. I didn't even have time for a second cup of tea while I was tracking them. Brilliant.  Started my day happy.:biggrin:

  • Like 3
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday I decided to go for a walk up the hill, but by a different route to normal. 

So, I walked in an ever decreasing circle.  Uphill to the top of the village and left along through a little hamlet called Longshaw Common  and big views over to Winter Hill, Rivington Pike etc., to the north.  After a mile or so, left again and uphill past a local pub called the Holt Arms, but known to locals as 'the Foot of the Causeway', the 'Foot'... or the 'Fewt'. Despite the proximity to Liverpool and more than a few refugee 'Scousers' residing locally, the predominant accent is pure Lancashire.  Legend has it that this pub is at the 'foot' of an old pack horse trail (causeway) from Liverpool direction.  On uphill for another half mile or so then as the houses peter out, ..left into the fields and into the bottom of 'Billinge Plantation'... known locally as 'the plants'. 

 

In common with almost all woods in the area, it's not all that old and is basically an overgrown 19th C stone quarry.  If the farmers could be in there ploughing, they would.  Still.. apart from rather too many Sycamores and far too many kids making mountain bike trails and churning up the woodland floor.. it's not a bad wood.  Plenty of Oak, Beech, Birch and Horse Chestnut.  Oddly, despite a lot of recent rain.. there were virtually no fungi to be seen.  I've been going in there long enough now to have a 'handle' on the usual sequence of fungi growth, and not even the 'Blackening Russula', which usually appears early and doesn't rot away quickly like most fungi, hasn't made an appearance.  Absolutely nothing in the small area where I can usually find a few Cepes (Boletus Edulis), usually accompanied by various Russula species, and the odd Amanita Rubescens ( 'The Blusher')

 

I can't work out what's going on.  Some years are definitely better than others for fungi, but this is odd.  Maybe everything came up early and I missed it all in the August rain.. maybe it's not too late yet.  But once we get a few frosts, that will pretty much be it apart from a couple of uncommon species and the usual crop of Wood Blewitts.. (usually in hedgerows rather than woods.)

 

So.. onwards.. still uphill through the woods and emerging onto the last steep slope up to the top of 'The Hill', from the north side rather than my usual southern route.   

 

Plenty to see, as visibility is usually better when the skies are watery.  When it's 'clear', the resulting haze makes at hard to see distant features clearly.  Manchester under some very dark clouds.. Liverpool a bit less so.  Jodrell Bank telescope clearly visible on the far horizon, with its dish pointed straight up, the unmistakable curve of the Runcorn Bridge superstructure etc.

 

Was getting a bit tired though, so after the knee killiing descent of the steepest part of the hill,bI was onto the gentle downward slope towards home.  I was certaly 'cream crackered' by the time I stepped off the fields at the bottom of our street.  My phone told me I'd done 10098 steps.  About 4000 more than my usual daily target, but still only about 6 or 7 K.  A long way short of the 10-15 miles I used to do regularly.  Joys of ageing eh?

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never been in that area, but as you described the walk, I was there!!  Thank you, Col

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Early into Bulwell this morning,,,,had my feet done with Svetlana my Russian lady up the Alley at 9am,,,feel like dancing now,,,.

                Then sat with some old friends in Wetherspoons,,,,, who   i'd not seen for over a year,,,,but they knew about my health issue......Col.360 had told em,,,thanks Col,,i spoke to Brian,,,he told me they had seen you,,,so had a nice catch up with them,,,then sat at another table with some more people from the past,,when i was leaving one of them said,,,,,,'''dont go yet Ben,,,the Shoplifter will be in soon with some John West Salmon'' at £1 per tin''''   anyway made me laugh,,, Bulwell don't change.........lol,,,

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, DJ360 said:

  A long way short of the 10-15 miles I used to do regularly.  Joys of ageing eh?

The distance is irrelevant. The walk sounded perfect - views and weather and a feeling of satisfaction.

Sound a peaceful place to live - the glums and mtbs apart!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As oldphil says the distance is irrelevant, and your walk sounds so lovely, with your description it is so easy to imagine your view. On these dry days we manage to get our cycle rides every day, just home from one. Our routes don't vary much, but just to do a route in a reversed order can give the feeling of being a totally different area.

 

To day we rode part of the  Staffs and Worc, out and across the A449 up towards the prisons, Brinsford/Oakwood/forgot the name of the third one, around the prisons and back down to the A449, down the lanes back onto the towpaths again, and along to Autherley junction.

 

Decided to stand on the bridge for a while watching some poor souls, standing up to their wastes in dirty canal water, trying to recover a trailer from the murky depths. On our outward journey they were trying to put a motor boat on a trailer built for something the size of a small yacht, it looked as if the trailer had broken and sunk! 

 

Like you Col, our trips these days are a lot shorter and gentler around 6/8mph and we are out about 2hrs, still love it. Just hope the knees can hold out a bit longer?

Other prison Featherstone?

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We took our Great granddaughter to a local village where they were cider making today. Of particular interest to me because they use my cider press and scratter. As usual there was a bit of Morris dancing - not by a regular troupe but by the locals having fun. My Great granddaughter had a go at turning the press and assisting on the scratter. She enjoyed the experience that not many kids (or adults) know anything about. I tried a couple of pints of last years cider and it is getting better each year. A simple day but quite precious. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bottoms up PP., would you be able to PM me a picture post of what a scratter looks like? I would be interested to see what one looks and to see if it would be viable to decorate one, or if it would be too big a task. Hobbin irons  and flat irons, no problem. B.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are now in Nottingham after speNding a pleasant afternoon at a friend's house near Leicester (Groby). It was a 60th Wedding Anniversary party arranged by their daughter, who used to be a little playmate to our 3 kids when we lived nearly next door to each other in Leicester.   We really enjoyed seeing them all again.

SatNav directed us to our hotel (Mansfield Road) via Gregory Boulevard so it took a long time as it was heaving with people trying to cross the road to get to the fair and cars were bumper to bumper for much of the way.  I think we'll go and have a wander round the fair tomorrow.... we're too tired to walk there tonight and Paul's watching Athletics on TV anyway (at least he WAS watching but he's  dropped off to sleep now!)

 Feeling a bit sleepy myself. .......zzzzzzz

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Close by then Margie!  We’ve just been in Doctors Orders for an hour or so.   Even though the Fair is only about half a mile away from us we really couldn’t be bothered going this year, must be getting too old for it.

EDIT: The athletics were worth watching, much better than that very tired offering on BBC1. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...