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When I was sitting in the dentist's waiting room this morning there were 10 other people.

 

3 of them were reading traditional waiting room material (housing and travel magazines) and the other 7 spent all the time looking at their phones. The 3 magazine readers were obviously the oldest, and the 7 phone readers were all noticeably younger.

 

In a few years time, there will be no need to have magazines in waiting rooms; no-one would know what to do with them.

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Just got back from QMC again........the last eight days have been a bit Traumatic to say the least,,...blood tests,,X-rays,,and today a visit to a Consultant........cut a long story short......problem

Result........CT Scans all clear......just got letter..been sweating for a fortnight......

Two years ago today..........my life changed forever,,,about this time i was on my way down to the operating theatre for what turned out to be a ten hour operation...........its been life changing in

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Good On Yer Nonna!!

 

Yesterday I met Picko and Daz from Nottm in Liverpool.  We didn't go into the Cavern because Tony wasn't playing and they've slapped a £2:50 door charge on during the day.. which I think is a real mistake.  Had a modest few scoops, in a couple of different pubs, and a nice (and very rare for me ) bit of Cod in the 'Famous Docklands Chippy'.. plus a general wander about.

 

Today we are off to a wedding shortly.  Will be a long day....

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10 minutes ago, Cliff Ton said:

When I was sitting in the dentist's waiting room this morning there were 10 other people.

 

3 of them were reading traditional waiting room material (housing and travel magazines) and the other 7 spent all the time looking at their phones. The 3 magazine readers were obviously the oldest, and the 7 phone readers were all noticeably younger.

 

In a few years time, there will be no need to have magazines in waiting rooms; no-one would know what to do with them.

Maybe CT., in that few years there will be smart phones on chains dotted around the waiting room.

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That's what I'm having. DIY unfortunately, restaurants very very busy and as usual at these times short staffed. Alex stays with me as long as possible then has to dash leaving them all to finish off. So I've just put some Findus breadcrumbed cod in oven. I don't usually like this sort of thing ready frozen but I've had these before and they are quite nice so of course I'm getting a little more exercise which can't be bad.:victory:

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No doubt you’ve lost a few pounds while being in hospital for nearly 2 weeks Nonna, as well as muscle loss through not being to get out of bed.  Take things steady and eat whatever you fancy whenever you feel like it.  Your strength will return but you’ve been through a serious procedure, the only way is up now :bighug:

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Well only 48 hours after our old neighbour’s  body was removed by Lymns his nephew has been up from Herts with a big van and taken what furniture he wanted from the house!    I think the only items still in the house will belong to Red Cross ....... ‘hospital type’ bed, chairs, Zimmer frames etc.  Sad innit? 

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Sad yes, but life goes on Lizzie. 

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Always best to get rid of the valuables before the valuers come in to assess for inheritance tax. This is usual in families. You can only be assessed on what’s there. The only problem is if there are other potential beneficiaries. That’s when the family fireworks start!

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21 minutes ago, philmayfield said:

Always best to get rid of the valuables before the valuers come in to assess for inheritance tax. This is usual in families. You can only be assessed on what’s there. The only problem is if there are other potential beneficiaries. That’s when the family fireworks start!

He came up the day we made the grim discovery.  He found the Will and told me everything is split 4 ways between him and his 3 other relations.  The solicitor is the executor so I’m sure he will drag everything out, time is money!   As for anything valuable, there was very little in the house and I think the nephew has got it now, but it only amounts to Danish retro furniture really. The house will sell for a good price so yes Phil Inheritance Tax will definitely come into play.  

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14 minutes ago, Cliff Ton said:

One way to solve the problem.

 

We could start to follow the old Egyptian practice of being buried with all our goods and possessions to help us in the afterlife.

 

LOL, I put my Dad’s watch and favourite knife and fork in his coffin! 

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They keep telling me I can't take it with me. That was of course before travellers cheques and credit cards!  ;)

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When my mother died the assessor ‘phoned to say they were coming to value her furniture and chattels. She lived in the adjoining granny flat with a connecting door. I asked them what they expected to find? ‘Ah,’ he said, ‘we’ll put the value in at nil then.’ That still didn’t stop me having an eye watering assessment for her house, bank account and investments. I did get the house and land plus a few quid. She was 92, suffering with Alzheimer’s and generally making our lives very difficult. There was enough left in her petty cash for the four of us to have a slap up lunch at the Sagar after the cremation!

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52 minutes ago, philmayfield said:

She was 92, suffering with Alzheimer’s and generally making our lives very difficult.

I don't doubt that there were times when, at a considerably younger age and with all your marbles, you made her life very difficult! 

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Lizzie in hospital I couldnt eat anything. Hospital food is never very good but this consisted of dried up pasta, very sloppy puree and spinach and creme caramel or fruit puree. The pasta was pushed to one side straightaway then just a forkful of potato and the same with spinach. When I was able to get out of bed it wasn't much better. My sil brought me something everyday but the things she liked and thought i would like. She kept telling me to eat but I just couldnt swallow. Its beginning to get better but I havent got the same interest in food that I had before. I know I have to eat so have decided to eat more frequently lighter meals. I soon feel full. Don't know whether I'll recouperate the 4 kg I have lost but will give it a good try.. Trouble is I don't feel hungry.

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Just wondering, In UK is all saints day celebrated apart for Halloween? It's very much celebrated here, being a village many young ones left years ago to more affluent parts and only return to pay their respects to long gone families. Chrysanthemums fill the cemeteries and it's a mad rush to find eateries. Today my son and husband were invaded by mostly ex patriots living in Germany Switzerland etc.  My son is still working now it's almost 7 pm and they have to start again for service this evening. My daughter has just phoned me. She started work at 8am has just sat down to rest a while before she starts her evening service. Tough job but they love it.

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A few years ago, there was a preponderance of candles in jars appearing on graves with Polish names on the headstones, even in tiny village churchyards here in Derbyshire on All Saints.  Presumably, it was the Polish expat community who placed them there and credit goes to those who did the reconnaissance. Must have taken some organising. It seems to have stopped now. Presumably, they've all returned home.

 

I thought it was a very nice gesture.

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Yes Jill it seems to be the catholic population that do it. Personally I think it's a form of expected tradition although I do think it's nice. Our village was overloaded yesterday and now they've mostly gone back to Milan, Turin or wherever their homes are now. Candles in red jars are in abundance everywhere not just for this occasion, even where road accidents have happened.

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My day has been shattered by the link below, an "influencer" on the internet wants teaching of World War 2 to be cut back as it may affect their mental health. Dose he not realise that kids his own age and younger fought and  died for the freedom of future generations, like him. What is happening with his generation.

 

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7638687/Instagram-influencer-22-claims-learning-World-War-Two-hit-millennials-MENTAL-HEALTH.html

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Back in 1990, we were staying in Auffach, Austria for Christmas. On Christmas eve we had a walk into the village about midnight and came upon the little graveyard. In the still of the night we could  hear a tiny tinkling in the air. On investigation in the graveyard we noticed lots of candles burning in little red glasses set on the graves and surrounded by about 10" of snow. We soon realised that the tinkling was coming from the little glasses. Apparently the actual glass was battling  between the heat of the candle and the extreme cold of the air and snow, so was expanding and contracting causing the tinkling. This was happening on all the graves that had lit candles, each had a little clear area around the glass, so in the dark the tiny pockets of light were magical.

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I couldn't agree with you more, young Trogg!

 

Only last night, I watched a DVD of The Dambusters filmed in 1955, before the pc brigade got in on the act.

 

History is history. It cannot be changed, it should not be rewritten and God forbid we should start apologising for it! The young men who risked...and in many cases gave...their lives to defend this wonderful country of ours from the Nazi menace should be remembered with pride, revered for their courage and regarded with gratitude. Without them, we'd have been slaughtered.  Their stories deserve to be told. To brush their deeds aside for fear of upsetting the, apparently, fragile emotions of some of today's younger generation is to dishonour the memory of individuals without whose selfless dedication and bravery our country would have been well and truly sunk without a trace.

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