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There’s a young fox wanders around Mapperley Park at night just recently.  We used to get foxes regularly, going through bins but didn’t see any for several years.  This young one seems fearless, he just sits and observes what’s going on, not timid at all.

At our previous, (rural) home we bought a dozen guinea fowl And one by one they were killed by Mr Fox. When we’d lost 6 we bought another dozen.  Eventually every single bird was killed by the fox.  Of course guinea fowl roost in trees, you don’t put them away at night so it’s pot-luck whether they remain safe.  They laid eggs all over the place but we never once tried one as we didn’t know how long they’d been lying in the middle of a flower bed or wherever!  
A friend who came over to do tree work for us would always bring his Border Collie along.  The dog kept himself busy all day by rounding up the guinea fowl and moving them all over the  garden.  

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10 hours ago, Brew said:

If the dining room light is just a switch wire  (no neutral), the fitting or a lighting junction box is probably used in a 'loop in loop out' configuration, there are other ways but that is the most common. Finding and identifying  a neutral will be messy.

 

You have a message Jim. :)

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Yesterday my daughter's little pup ate a fag end whilst out for a walk.  Stef managed to recover the filter tip, but he swallowed the 'baccy'.

 

Some hours later she found him shaking and 'weird'..so she took him to the emergency vets. 

 

Afer taking him into a closed room and allegedly examining him.. they declared him 'fine' and charged 150 quid.

 

Hmm.

 

I suspect he got a bit of nicotine poisoning and reacted much the same way as any of us did to our first Ciggy..  but since there's not enough of him to make a decent Butty.. he probably felt pretty ropey for a while.

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16 hours ago, mary1947 said:

maybe have a fleet of race horse's  with trainers's

Mary, horses come in stables, boats or cars etc, come in fleets, anyway my advice is go for it,  the feeling you get when your horse is first past the post is amazing. There are also the privileges you get at the meetings by being an owner, well, there are here.

15 hours ago, Beekay said:

Shouldn't imagine you'd get much change Mary, if you bought a decent racehorse.

Hi BK, There is a horse in racing here in SA called BEEOKAY makes me think of you everytime it runs

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Sorry for upsetting you Margie. Charlie and son did have a few good years and I like to remember them enjoying our shared territory. Charlie used to sit under a stand of tall cherry trees, listening for a ripe cherry to fall. The day after I would find little piles of cherry stone poo. The first time I saw Charlie jr he was playing with the apples that were hanging low on the branches. He was just full grown and a lovely colour. His dad had gone a different shades of brown and looked a bit dusty. He was probably quite old. So happy memories too.

Jill - how do you stop your cats from killing the wrens?...or other birds?

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PP's post reminded me of mums Freddie fox. Whenever I visited her in Scotland there was always scraps of meat left on the worktop near to the back door. He came every evening always at the same time. He'd wait at the top of the path looking towards the kitchen window. Mum would take the food out and Freddie would dash behind the shed only to pop his head round to see if she'd gone in. Mum loved him as she loved all sorts of animals. She would buy the multi packs of sausages from Aldis or Lidl and he would get two every evening plus the scraps so he was a very well fed fox. One day while I was there I managed to stay outside while he came back for his food and I managed to get quite close to him and managed to take a lovely photo. ( which I've posted before somewhere)  He even brought his wife with him once. When mum came to live here she worried about him saying that he wouldn't be welcome by the new owners and he would be shooed away. Every evening she would say " wonder what Freddie is doing, hope he's not hungry." I would spend hours just watching him and taking photos. He had some comical poses.

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Hi Oz, Beeokay is a bloody good name for a hoss  ! If I were there I'd put a bet on him for sure. You can't  beat

a 6d each way, now and again.

Sorry to hear about the curfews etc down there, it sounds awful. When I said 'Martial Law' it was tongue in cheek but now I'm not so sure. Take care mate. Gudday! 

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Some will laugh ...and let them...but I reckon your mum has found Freddie waiting for her, Nonna.  Those we love, be they human or animal, are linked to us always, in my opinion.  Doesn't apply to gold bars and money. Those you cannot take with you, love and kindness you can take with you.  We shall all find out, shall we not? ;)

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2 hours ago, PeverilPeril said:

Jill - how do you stop your cats from killing the wrens?...or other birds?

PP, two of my cats don't go outdoors. That is their choice. They aren't interested. My two older cats go out on a lead and harness. I live on a busy road and their safety is paramount. They have done so since they were kittens and are quite happy. The eldest has caught birds in the past but now just likes to look and doesn't seem bothered although I watch her carefully.

 

The killer in my garden is a sparrowhawk who regularly strikes and often leaves piles of feathers or an abandoned prey at the foot of a particular large tree.  It is distressing but that's nature, red in tooth and claw.

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Before I moved out here to the ‘sticks’ I lived about 2 miles from the market square in Radford. A small cul de sac off a cul de sac so it was pretty quiet. My garden was quite large and behind the fence at the bottom the ground dropped away sharply with a steep bank and retaining wall holding the ground back so that bank was quiet. Frequent visitors to my garden were badgers and a fox. The badgers were very timid and rarely seen, only at dusk. The fox was quite timid but did occasionally look in through the patio. I recall one day looking out to see about 3 or 4 fox cubs on the lawn play fighting with a local cat. They rolled and played for some time with ‘mum’ fox just sat quietly nearby watching. If I hadn’t seen it I wouldn’t have believed it.

When I worked through the night in the city I would often see a fox walk across the market square. I saw more wildlife in the garden in the heart of Nottingham than I do out here in a very rural village. The most memorable sighting I’ve had was seeing a pair of hares boxing as the mist rolled around them in the early morning.

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He’s right. I’ve seen more foxes driving through Mapperley Park at night then I ever see here in the countryside. Perhaps urban foxes are tamer. I’ve got a night view infra red motion sensor camera which I used to set up in the garden and that revealed lots of activity where foxes, badgers and hedgehogs could be seen picking up the dropped seeds from the bird feeder. 

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Back in the 1950s, the view from my Mum's bedroom window was straight out over the fields, with the old Rigley's Wagon works slightly left.  Straight ahead was the area which Rigley's later used for quarrying sand. but at that time was just rough heathland.  We often saw 'Mad March Hares' 'boxing' on that patch. They were usually right on the skyline so stood out dramatically.

I've spotted a few foxes around the Phoenix Park area when travelling to and from the M1 at Nuthall.

 

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I read somewhere that boxing hares were normally females fighting over a fella. Never had anybody fighting over me though.

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The only time I’ve seen hares boxing was from the window of a property we were staying in in the south of Sweden.  An amazing sight, to me anyway.

In our 5 acre wood in Hertfordshire we had a badger sett, possibly more than one.  I got a call from the owner of a neighbouring field who’d seen men from what I assumed was a Badger Protection League in our fields.  We’d got post and rail fencing, dividing 3 paddocks from the wood and fixed onto that we had sheep wire to keep livestock in.  Bravely I got our beautiful docile but scary-looking Rhodesian Ridgeback on a lead and went to investigate.  These men were cutting big holes in the wire-fencing, to allow the badgers to roam all over the fields.  I told them they were trespassing and to clear off, they went away without uttering a word! 
One moonlit night I got up for the loo, looked out onto the lawn and saw several badgers playing and having fun, little devils used to dig the lawn up regularly.  

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They're especially cute in the autumn when they've been scoffing fallen fruit and they fill the holes they've dug in the lawn with badger doo doo!  Still love them, though. Prefer anything to humans! :P

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Jill, not ALL humans are bad!  Many people do care for the flora and fauna in this world, and work towards making the earth a cleaner and more sustainable planet, albeit in a small way.  

 

Unfortunately there are big businesses,, which perhaps see things in a different way.  And of course there are lazy greedy individuals everywhere who are just out for what they can get for as little effort as possible.  

 

I've just re-read the last sentence and that actually applies to cats as well  :Shock:

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Of course it does, Margie! They make no apologies for it. They don't need to. ;)

 

Of course not all humans are bad. I just find the vast majority of them hard work! :P

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7 hours ago, Beekay said:

I read somewhere that boxing hares were normally females fighting over a fella. Never had anybody fighting over me though.

I have a ‘Google nest‘ in my bedroom. If you aren’t aware it’s a voice operated device connected to WiFi, ie “Hey google what’s the weather going to do Tomorrow” etc.

I have programed it with my name as ‘Darling’. So if I say hey google goodnight, I get a nice female voice saying goodnight darling. I do believe my wife is a tiny bit jealous. I recently overheard her plotting with my tech savvy grandson to change my Darling to ‘old man’

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16 hours ago, Oztalgian said:

Mary, horses come in stables, boats or cars etc, come in fleets, anyway my advice is go for it,  the feeling you get when your horse is first past the post is amazing. There are also the privileges you get at the meetings by being an owner, well, there are here.

Hi BK, There is a horse in racing here in SA called BEEOKAY makes me think of you everytime it runs

Hi Oz would love to own a race horse, but the nearest i have got to any race winner was after master and i married master's father was a race goer, and we went down to Newmarket. plus my uncle was on the gate, we went in best side thanks to my uncle. We waited for the horse's to parade around the ring, when they did start parading who should appear but the Queen, she gave us all a little wave then she was gone, (no not for tea an cake's) she had two horses running and she had come down to see them. My father in law told us to bet on both the Queen's horse's as seeing she had come to watch one at least would win. He was right one did come in first, can not remember what odd's it was though.  We still like to go to race meetings even though my father in law is no longer with us. 

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9 hours ago, philmayfield said:

He’s right. I’ve seen more foxes driving through Mapperley Park at night then I ever see here in the countryside.

 

Have they passed their driving test?

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We owned a leg of a racehorse once upon a time and went to Windsor to watch it come in nearly last.  I enjoy a little gamble now and again and have a Paddy Power account but haven’t let gambling get the better of me!   We used to go racing a lot years ago, but in the comfort of a box at the south-east racecourses, courtesy of the friend who persuaded us to invest in THAT LEG.  We had great times and met some really interesting and well-known people In the box, my favourite was the late George Martin, a lovely man, his missus was up her own though! 

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Talking of racecourses, for a short while I used to drive a St. John's ambulance on a voluntary basis. On the odd occasions,  I used to be in attendance with ambulance on the course at Colwick racecourse. My job was, when the race started, I would have follow the runners on a parallel course round the track, between two designated points. I would sit with engine running until the horses were nearly level and then off I  went to the end of my section, then another vehicle took over and I went back to my start. The idea being, if a jockey took a tumble,I would be there to pick him up and take him to the first aid station. There was always about 4 blokes next to each of the fences.

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Mary1947, Beekay and LizzieM

I hope you all manage a flutter on horses that manage to beat the ambulance home.

Seriously though, admiration to all involved in riding these magnificent animals, 60kph on a 600kg animal with a mind of its own and no brakes is a dangerous way to earn a living.You don't get a full sense of how fast, or how close they are together and how powerful they are until you stand on the running rail as they approach the winning post. You first hear the pounding hooves, the shouts of the jockeys and the breathing of the horses. We were regular race goers until covid 19 came around, it is just starting to open to spectators again but we are still being cautious. 

 

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Hi Oz   did have a few rinding lessons and did enjoy it, Then my father became ill and mum needed us, as we were  at that time liveing  .at rhe coast,  We also like -to go to the race ..meeting's

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