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The Health and Safety at Work Act was derived from a report by Lord Robens on the Flixborough disaster in 1974. This was an explosion at a chemical works in north Lincs. I remember flying over there to view the wreckage which was unbelievable. I think the Act came out in around 1977 by the then Labour government. I remember being the one to implement the new rules at my company. We still complain about it but it is acted on with relish by petty officialdom!

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Just got back from QMC again........the last eight days have been a bit Traumatic to say the least,,...blood tests,,X-rays,,and today a visit to a Consultant........cut a long story short......problem

Two years ago today..........my life changed forever,,,about this time i was on my way down to the operating theatre for what turned out to be a ten hour operation...........its been life changing in

It's not often I put personal stuff on here so here goes, a few years ago I found a woman daft enough who would marry me , some of you have met Margaret at some of the meet ups and yesterday was the d

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I remember Flixborough, delivered to their stores 2 days before the accident. Another stroke of fate for us was sailing on the "Herald of Free Enterprise" a couple days before her disaster .

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I did wonder at the time if I was partly responsible for the Flixborough explosion. In 1973 we transported a huge stainless streel tank from a factory in Croydon to the chemical plant. It was so big it would not go under the motorway or A1 bridges and needed a police escort. In Bedford, under instructions, we contravened a one way but in doing so took down a shop blind and one of the many outlet pipes hit a wall. At the time of the explosion I wondered if we damaged the pipework and a leak caused the bang. Later, looking at the pictures, the tank was one of the few still standing so had nothing to do with it.

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I had a boat called ‘Enterprise’ around time of the ‘Herald’ disaster. I’d just sold it and was sailing it downstream from Fardon Harbour to the purchaser at Newark Marina. It was the first trip of the season and I’d previously turned off the fuel tap when I’d winterised it. We got a few hundred yards downstream when the diesel engine cut out and we were drifting towards Kelham weir. Fortunately, on board, as well as my young son, was my friend Derrick, who at that time was chief engineer at Nottingham City Transport. He quickly grabbed a spanner and bled the diesel whilst I cranked the engine which at last spluttered into life. Within a hundred yards of the weir we were motoring again. One of my many near disasters!

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The H&S Act came out in 1974 as Phil wrote due to that report. Before that there was numerous Acts for specific trades , such as Mines and Quarries ,Office and shops etc but they were all specific in what they covered and many places had no legislation whatsoever. For example in the Fire Service you could go inspect a premise and fire precautions could be insisted on, yet you could go into a 4 storied residential house where the only entrance-exit was the front door and everywhere including the stairs was piled high with Flammable fabrics waiting to be made up into garments, yet as all the personnel working there were all family members you could only advise them. Leaving them with without a fire extinguisher or means of escape in the event of a fire. Also with the changing nature of industry a lot of what we would consider factories were no longer covered because of the narrow definition of what a factory was.

 

As phil said once this Legislation came in there was an immediate surplus in experts in this field and would set up businesses as Consultants charging high fees and other bodies using it to further their own ends. This has happened  numerous times when different Legislation was enacted and I believe they must sit and think up the smallest item to blow it up to a major problem , to increase the charges and their own importance.  In most Acts you find the phrase " where reasonably practical" this I think has been forgotten.

 There now seems to be a lack of common sense in all areas of society or is it that society has changed and everybody must have all there thinking done for them and looked after like small children.

Eg if you buy a bag of nuts it must be labelled "may contain nut" to protect people with nut allergies.

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18 hours ago, AfferGorritt said:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The “interview” was definitely skewed towards why I had pushed this guy. Was it in self defence? Did I feel threatened? Why did I push him a second time? By the time she’d finished I definitely felt that I was defending MY actions. Never again!

What happened to you AG is the reason i wouldn't get involved......the law is a minefield...to stop anyone for theft in a store you must observe all the following...

1/ Person approach the product..

2/ select the item..

3/ conceal it...

4/ Exit the store,,,making no attempt to pay...

Only then.. and never having lost sight of suspect...should you Approach and accuse.......

                Not having witnessed all the above....leaves you open to be accused of a wrongful detainment...of which if proved could cost you a lot of money......

             Also the touching and detainment of anyone opens up even more of a legal minefield.......

            All professional Store Detectives worth their salt will have received thorough training in all these aspects of law...before being let loose on the General public.......So my advice is Don;t get involved.............

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I went for a walk late this afternoon.  Although I should have expected it as the weather has warmed up considerably, I wasn't ready for the numbers of people walking on MY access road to the hill.  I counted over 100 in a less than 1/2 mile stretch.  For info... on any other given Monday.. winter or Summer.. at about 4:30 p.m. I'd see one or two at most, and would be unsurprised to met nobody at all. The only benefit of such crowds is that I can justify indulging in my geriatric love of a good moan. Meldrew is an amateur compared to me. ;)

 

So..I took a slightly less usual route to avoid the mob, and walked alongside the little stream which runs through the fields a hundred yards or so below our house.  Now.. if you are a very sad person like me.. you notice physical details in the landscape.  You don't just stroll past with your head in the air.. or up your ****. 

 

The stream has changed... albeit probably temporarily.  After the floods which came before the cold snap.. all local streams and ponds were a muddy brown.. no doubt filled with the run off from the fields. This afternoon, the stream, flowing much less forcefully, was crystal clear.  But, more interesting to me.. was they way in which the recent floods seem to have 'graded' the assorted sand, gravel, pebbles and cobbles in there.  So now, there are distinct areas where gravel is piled up and all the individual bits looking clearly different colours.  Similar for larger cobbles etc... and in 'slack' areas especially, drifts and low banks of pure white fine sand.. all of its muddying plant decay etc.. washed away.  It won't last..  Assorted levels of rainfall will no doubt bring it back to its usual pretty normal status, and the plants will all grow up in the Spring.

 

Interesting though.  There's always something interesting to see at any time of year.  If you look..

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I spent a couple of hours fishing on the Trent yesterday. It's only a small river - 10 or 15 yards wide here. I observe just what DJ observed yesterday on a regular basis. Rivers and streams are changing all the time and they have been changing even faster in the last few years with sudden spates occurring more often. Some parts of rivers will change even more with the introduction of Beavers.

I have been watching the local Trent change for over 40 years and hoping that I live long enough to see an Oxbow form. Trees were planted in the most likely place last year but as they grow the flood currents will divert and cut away the bankside elsewhere. 

It's not all about the fishing.

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Lovely day yesterday, we had a relaxed sort of day. All thoughts of what we needed to do were pushed away to one side. We went to lunch at my sons restaurant, first time eating out for a long time. It felt as though there were no restrictions around. After a very busy weekend in both restaurants it was nice and quiet, just enough customers not to feel the only ones but not too many to feel it was too many in these times. The young chef who had taken over while my husband was in hospital and is now convalescing, really came out tops. He created some new dishes and is managing the kitchen very well. We did say he will either sink or swim.

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I've been watching the collared doves in the garden. Male dove chasing after a group of females who've come down to feed.  What a display he put on. Strutting up and down, hopping, body posturing, displaying his tail feathers, preening. He's gone through all that with each female, one at a time while they were scoffing their breakfast. Then they all flew off and left him!  Ah!  Reminded me of our Ben! :wacko:

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QUERY..Can anybody help please. 

I'm trying to find out the location, where it was or if still there of Mulberry Street, Nottingham. Any help will be gratefully received. 

Thanking you in anticipation. Barrie. :clapping:

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No idea Phil, hence the query. Apparently,  my mum and dad lived the in 1939, 4 years before I were born.

Hoped that some kind soul would have a street map that could help me.

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Surreal at the moment. Went to bed shivering - very badly. Three blankets and winter duvet sort of worked. Hour later, woke up in a cold sweat. Banished to the spare room, window open wide and no duvet - bliss!

Still couldn't sleep, so walked the estate - very weird this time of night. Then how's this for surreal? Heard a swishing, getting louder, and three guys on mountain bikes with the brightest lights I've ever seen came flying down the main drag.

Back home, mug of tea and check the web. Apparently the mild fever (it didn't feel mild) means the immune system is working properly.

Will try to rest, if not sleep, for a bit. Think it might be an early breakfast and get the bike out.

Night Night!

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@oldphil  I’ve given you a like, not because you had an uncomfortable night, but because that is what happened to us with the really bad shivering!  Didn’t go out for a midnight stroll, though!

wonder if the second jab will produce the same side effects?

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CT some people don’t seem to have any side effects.  We are all different...

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22 minutes ago, Jill Sparrow said:

@oldphil

 

Which vaccine did you have? A friend had the Pfizer yesterday and reports a slightly swollen, sore arm this morning. Nothing worse.

It was the Oxford AZ - made in Liverpool!

Had the sore arm but not much else.

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