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1 hour ago, MargieH said:

. It’s the tibia,

 

Capt. Mainwaring:  " Well done Wilson.. I was wondering how long it would take for someone to spot that..." 

 

You are of course correct Margie.  It wasn't me.. I was confused by the painkillers...:blush:

 

 

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Result........CT Scans all clear......just got letter..been sweating for a fortnight......

Just got back from QMC again........the last eight days have been a bit Traumatic to say the least,,...blood tests,,X-rays,,and today a visit to a Consultant........cut a long story short......problem

Two years ago today..........my life changed forever,,,about this time i was on my way down to the operating theatre for what turned out to be a ten hour operation...........its been life changing in

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I had my left knee replacement 3 years ago. Good result, no pain following the operation or during physio. It straightened the slightly bowed out leg profile and makes the other leg look worse.

I could probably walk a greater distance than 200mts I could manage before the op, however, my other worn out knee joint makes walking distance restrictive. 

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My neighbour had both knees done. She is a former Theatre Sister who has lots of contacts ..

She was all set to have one done, but told them at the last minute that she would not be able to use the other after the op as it was so bad.. so they reversed the order of the ops.

She was also havng the op whilst still fairly conscious, but asked them to 'put her under' part way through. She told me it wasn't pain.. but the noise and vibration were really getting to her.

When it comes to my turn.. the less I know about it the better.

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Interesting stuff Alpha. I am noticeably bow legged now..

As for distance.  I cannot walk any distance at all without pain and am often in pain at rest, and in bed.  However.. if I ignore the pain, I can manage about 15 minutes walking on the flat..though much slower than I'd like. If I walk away from my starting point for 15 minutes.. it takes me about 25 minutes for the return, by which time I'm really smarting.

What shocks me is how fast this has all come on. Some years ago I could easily do 15-20 miles in a day. In the last couple of years I had a target of 6000 steps, which was not difficult and I had no pain at rest.  In less than six months  it's come to this.

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DJ360,

 

I had full anaesthetic, out like a light. The following morning I was up walking with a Zimmer frame then onto elbow crutches. I think I can manage general mobility without my other knee being replaced but I'm now reconsidering it. That is, if I can get another appointment.

 

Good luck!

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I knew a bloke who had a leg amputated under local anesthetic because of his dicky heart. 

All went well he said & never felt a thing. Worse part he said was hearing his leg being dawn off.  !!

You might have known him BK from your Bilborough days on NCT.

His name was Ken Henley. Real nice bloke.

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Catfan, in my nursing days, a leg was often amputated if there was a severely blocked (usually femoral) artery.  You and Paul know about that!  It was before stents were invented.  The condition was/is called intermittent claudication and it presents as acute pain in the lower leg and foot after exercise because there is insufficient blood getting to the muscles there.  Peripheral arteries usually try and take over from the blocked main femoral artery but often that isn’t sufficient to alleviate the pain.  Sometimes the toes may even become gangrenous because of insufficient blood supply.

I remember one particular patient who had bilateral amputations and his name was …… wait for it …….

Arthur Shufflebottom.  THIS IS TRUE!

 

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Bloke who drinks in The Wheelhouse, he's got real feet & false legs :Shock:

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Margie, the mother of a school friend of mine had first one and then both legs removed due to the problem you describe as gangrene had set in.  She was only in her  late 60s/early 70s. Terrible thing to happen to anyone. I suspect that heavy smoking was a major factor as I never saw her without a cigarette.  In those days, people didn't seem to know any better.

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1 hour ago, catfan said:

knew a bloke who had a leg amputated under local anesthetic because of his dicky heart. 

All went well he said & never felt a thing. Worse part he said was hearing his leg being sawn off.  !

A case of Wide Eyed and Legless....as the song said!

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22 minutes ago, Beekay said:

Carfan, have you any idea when Ken Henley was at Bilborough?

Not sure but when Bilborough shut he came to Bulwell. He was a driver for years at Bilborough.

His wife worked at Player's for years

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Catfan, I'm afraid I've no knowledge of when Bilborough depot shut up shop. I left in 1967 to venture further afield, but still in Nottingham.

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Catfan, same as Paul.  His foot is always cold and often he can’t feel his toes properly.  They tried to insert stents in his artery but the blockage was too long and they gave up.  His peripheral arteries have taken over quite well though.  He was told to keep exercising through any pain which he does.  He’s found that not walking too briskly and resting for short breaks in between really helps.  He can still play table tennis and smash most of the opposition as well.

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40 minutes ago, MargieH said:

 His foot is always cold .......

 

In winter, as I've got older I suffer from Raynaud's disease, in either my feet or various fingers (it's not fussy).

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raynaud_syndrome

 

In my feet it's only there for 15-20  minutes at a time and then it goes away without me doing anything; with fingers it can be for longer.

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54 minutes ago, MargieH said:

Catfan, same as Paul.  His foot is always cold and often he can’t feel his toes properly.  They tried to insert stents in his artery but the blockage was too long and they gave up.  His peripheral arteries have taken over quite well though.  He was told to keep exercising through any pain which he does.  He’s found that not walking too briskly and resting for short breaks in between really helps.  He can still play table tennis and smash most of the opposition as well.

Spot on Margie. Walk & rest then walk more & rest.

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5 hours ago, Jill Sparrow said:

Margie, the mother of a school friend of mine had first one and then both legs removed due to the problem you describe as gangrene had set in.  She was only in her  late 60s/early 70s. Terrible thing to happen to anyone. I suspect that heavy smoking was a major factor as I never saw her without a cigarette.  In those days, people didn't seem to know any better.

I do remember being told in our study times that smoking was a  major cause of the condition.  Diet was never mentioned nor any other factors….  My Paul stopped smoking over 40 years ago, his diet is mainly healthy and he has always been an active person, so I think there must be other factors at work….

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@Cliff Ton one of our sons has Raynaud’s in his hands - he has some special gloves to wear when it’s cold weather.

I believe severe cases can have a minor op near their shoulder which may help, but I don’t know much about that 

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4 hours ago, catfan said:

Early 80s if my memory serves me right BK.

As stated in an earlier post, a while ago, I emigrated dahn Sarf at the start of 1987, February to be exact. The most recent occasions I've been allowed  back, I hardly recognise anywhere.

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I think the Queen's father, George VI suffered the same problem. I've read that, during meetings, he would get up from his chair and bash his leg against the wall or a piece of furniture because he had lost all sensation in it. He did this with such violence at times that those who witnessed it were shocked he didn't injure himself.

 

Although it wasn't made public at the time, he lost a lung due to cancer and it had probably spread to the remaining one.  He was a known chain smoker and also a heavy drinker, especially during the stress of the war years. Yet, as a young man, he had been extremely fit and was regarded as a professional level tennis player.

 

I think it has long been known that smoking is a killer. Nottingham being the home of Player's and employing so many people possibly didn't do them any favours.

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