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Memories are great; but I often wonder if a memory is somehow just my imagination ... it's an age thing.

When I married at the end of the '60s, we had the reception at home. My mum made the buffet.  What I remember is going to the local baker and buying the cobs. This was a circular, flat product about 18 inches across, scored into a number of cobs. From the whole, you tore off the individual cobs. Then cut and filled them as desired.

I think this was the origin of the name 'cob' as the whole had the appearance of a cobbled road.

 

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This is the closest image I can find, but it's not what I remember; these cobs are obviously baked in 6's. There were a lot more (smaller) cobs in the round baked product that I remember.  Anyone any idea what I'm talking about?

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That's reminded me of the mini cottage loaves that Pork Farms on Friar Lane, next to D&P used to sell in the 70s. They were available just as they were or salad filled for lunchtime. Delicious. Never saw them anywhere else.

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Dave Mills I think I know what you are on about , the other half still buys them from Francis Bakery in Hucknall they are a lot smaller than normal cobs and she always refers to them as cut offs. 

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If I remeber correctly a 'batch' was a round crusty loaf.

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Definitely Brew, and with flour sprinkled on the top too !

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10 hours ago, Dave Mills said:

Memories are great; but I often wonder if a memory is somehow just my imagination ... it's an age thing.

When I married at the end of the '60s, we had the reception at home. My mum made the buffet.  What I remember is going to the local baker and buying the cobs. This was a circular, flat product about 18 inches across, scored into a number of cobs. From the whole, you tore off the individual cobs. Then cut and filled them as desired.

I think this was the origin of the name 'cob' as the whole had the appearance of a cobbled road.

 

_original

 

This is the closest image I can find, but it's not what I remember; these cobs are obviously baked in 6's. There were a lot more (smaller) cobs in the round baked product that I remember.  Anyone any idea what I'm talking about?

Weren't they called "Bread Cakes" ?

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I have taken a photo this morning of what I think you mean ,the baker said they used to bake them regularly but now only does them to order . the picture is of a display of items he does .the one in question is the round one in the middle which has been pulled slightly apart for display purposes. Ignore the big cob placed in the middle and all the other ones, and you are left with a round piece about a foot in diameter where you pull the individual ones off as required. I tried to follow instructions after joining postimage . If it is not here I try again.

 don't know what I done but it come out large and I don't know what to do. If it is a problem can some delete all of it please

bakers.jpg

 

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Yes these are cobs. No real idea of the origins but in stones, they are something larger than a pebble and smaller than a boulder. Often smoothed by water, but not necessarily.

 

59c35c6408f2d_Cobbles_Nash_Point1.jpg.afa330c4b558d14498faf8932111f2a9.jpg

 

The stones look similar to cobs of bread, as do cobblestone streets. 

 

59c35dc8807ea_cobblestonestreet.jpg.911a2aa8cac435329fe43959e9414f7e.jpg

 

 

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Cobs, as applied to bread, seems to  be a local term. Friends in West Yorkshire always referred to 'BREAD BUNS' and I've also heard the term BREAD CAKES. Cobs is the term in Derbyshire though!

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Cobs are referred to as baps in the north east, and were round with flour on top. 

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Trog; That's the jobby. So It's not my imagination!  But what is it called - what do you ask the baker for?

 

It has been suggested to me that the origin of the name 'cob' for a small round bread may be in coal mining.  Apparently a small round lump of coal is a cob. It makes sense that miners and their families would call a similarly sized bread a cob. This also explains why the name seems to be local to Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire.

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Dave I never thought of asking the name , I will call in next week and ask , it will give me a creep points with the wife if I say I am only going to buy a cream cake for her.

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if you are going into a bakery, surely it's Brownie points?

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Dave,  called in the bakers a lady told me the name they have used for the last 60-70 years is cob ring , she said that customers called them a ring of cobs. All the cobs were smaller than the usual ones they baked and mostly ordered for parties and buffets. So it seems that there was no specific name for them .  So maybe it was called different things in different towns and villages by local bakers before the major bakers took over. Hope that helps.

trogg

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Ding! Thanks Trogg ... 'Party Ring' was what we ordered at our local bakery here in Bridgford.

Question answered, with some interesting stuff along the way. 

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