Jill Sparrow

Bobbers Mill Road area

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I remember her quite well. Just wish she had lived longer so that I could have got to know her better which, in my case, means pestering the living daylights out of the poor woman for family history purposes.

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It is always strange to me how some folks have vivid memories from their childhood where as I have very few before I was 8 or 10. There are certain things I remember like throwing a wooden block through a window at Whitemoor nursery or being made to lie down on camp beds after lunch at the same place but little else.

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I can remember being pushed in my pram and also in my pushchair. I also remember being in my cot in my parents' bedroom at Bobbers Mill. Not always so clear about what I did last week! ;)

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letsvagoo

 

Thank you for a very informative post. I cannot make the talk you mentioned, and I will be in London for the Remembrance weekend. 

 

Your history is very personal, and therefore intense and fascinating. All the good that you have the letters. I admire that you have done some positive work with a performance and talks. Well done indeed. 

 

I have letters from my uncle, who died at the hands of the Japanese. I suspect that at some point you and me are going to have a good chat about these things. 

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On 9/29/2017 at 9:33 PM, Jill Sparrow said:

medium-2.jpg

 

This is my great uncle, John Samuel Ward, known as Jack. He lived at 24 Suez Street, Basford. I think it was NBL who posted some time ago that he thought he remembered my great aunt, Minnie Cordelia Ward from his childhood. Minnie was Jack's auntie and also lived at 24 Suez Street until 1962.

 

Jack was a Sherwood Forester, killed in 1918, aged 23. He looks so much older. His name is on the war memorial at St Leodigarius.

He was 22. Son of Samuel and Elizabeth Ward, 24 Suez Street. He lies at Queant Street, a small cemetery I do not know, but it is right in the middle of the Somme area. By the location of the cemetery it looks like his final resting place was moved from where he was originally interred. 3rd Division went through that area like a dose of salts on 2 September 2018 and was one of he elements which finished the war. 

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^^^^^^^^^^I think you might mean Queant Road Cemetery. I only say this because I visited in 2002 a lovely spot and as usual beautifully kept. As you say one of the smaller cemeteries just over 900 souls if I remember correctly.

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According to the paperwork I have, it's Queant Road. I have never been there but it's nice to hear a description of it. Jack, in his civilian life, worked at a bleaching and dyeing company, possibly Saxby's. I have his framed photograph on the wall and have always felt a strong connection with him. He looks very much like my uncle George who lived in Garden Street...they were first cousins. George was also in The Notts & Derby Regiment. He was taken prisoner by the Germans mid 1918but was, ultimately, more fortunate than Jack.

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I went over with friends purposely to visit the sites of the Somme battles and of course the cemeteries, it was the scale of these places that stunned me and brought home the scale of the sacrifice made.

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On 29/09/2017 at 10:12 PM, NewBasfordlad said:

It is always strange to me how some folks have vivid memories from their childhood where as I have very few before I was 8 or 10. There are certain things I remember like throwing a wooden block through a window at Whitemoor nursery or being made to lie down on camp beds after lunch at the same place but little else.

You've just fired up my memory of Whitemoor nursery NBL. About 1949 I started and the first day we played in table mounted sandbox. One day I tied a wooden cotton reel on the end of a piece of string and spun it like an aeroplane propeller, the knot came undone and the reel went through a window. I too remember the campbeds and, in the mornings, a stick of burnt toast to eat. We all wore smocks with individual badges on the chest, mine was a swan which matched up to the swan badge on the clothes peg in the washroom where the individual soap and towel bags hung. We had a toy cash register and cardboard coins to play shop.

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On 9/30/2017 at 2:58 AM, Jill Sparrow said:

I can remember being pushed in my pram and also in my pushchair. I also remember being in my cot in my parents' bedroom at Bobbers Mill. Not always so clear about what I did last week! ;)

I tell you what Jill, just found this thread and until then, thought that I was the only one that can remember stuff like that. I can remember being pushed in a pushchair and nursery, most significantly because my mother cleared off when I was 4yrs old. I could describe the layout of our home in detail, but what did I do last week? I will have to count back the days.

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It's true, Waddo. People say I'm imagining it but I clearly remember events and even entire conversations from very early childhood.

 

I recall lying on the sofa in front of the fire, having a nap when I was tiny, covered with my fleecy blue pram blanket, when a fall of soot came down the chimney. My mother ran into the room screaming "Oh! My baby, my baby" and scooped me up in her arms while dad cleared up the soot!

 

Psychologists reckon we have little recall prior to the age of 4. Rubbish, say I!

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What do psychologist's know? Folks like us need to be taken more seriously. My aunt Peggy, (every one was an aunt or uncle) used to take me to the end of st Ann's well rd in a pushchair to see the conductor (her husband) at the terminus.

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I can remember being ill lying downstairs in front of the fire in a 'bed' made from 2 armchairs pushed together.  I know I was still a baby because I was drinking from a baby bottle of milk.  It wasn't like the bottles that some babies use these days - it was shaped like a banana with a teat at one end.  I also remember waking up in my cot when it was in Mum and Dad's bedroom.  I was crying because I'd just woken up and it was dark.

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That was a popular way of treating colds and the like. When I was working and someone didn't turn up for work a relative would ring us up to excuse them and say "he's baggleh on two chairs"

 

You've got a good memory there MargieH. I can remember a lot from childhood, but I think a good memory is very satisfying so long as you can filter out the painful stuff.

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My wife’s great grandad, John Whyman, was the signalman at that crossing and lived in that square house. He had to attend quite a few inquests at the Wheatsheaf after several fatalities at the crossing. That’s why the footbridge was eventually built.

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Sorry, I was trying to quote from a previous post of Willow Wilson’s re the photo of Bobbers Mill railway crossing, but technology got the better of me - as usual!

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12 hours ago, AfferGorritt said:

My wife’s great grandad, John Whyman, was the signalman at that crossing and lived in that square house. He had to attend quite a few inquests at the Wheatsheaf after several fatalities at the crossing. That’s why the footbridge was eventually built.

 

My Great Grandad was the same John Whyman.  His youngest Son Jack was my Grandad.

 

I haven't forgotten that I promised you a disc of Whyman family pics.  Just been a bit distracted.. :)  I will get it to you soon.

You may find this thread interesting too:

 

https://nottstalgia.com/forums/topic/15163-nut-yard-bobbers-mill/

 

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Hello Colin,

I've done quite a bit of research on the Whyman's recently. Your's and my wife's common ancestor seems to be John Whyman. If you want copies of the Word files I've compiled, just pm me your email address and I'll send them to you.

You might have a lot of the information already, but it costs nowt!

 

 

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