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There appear to be some letters missing from the writing in the wall but. ORKING  AN'S  RUSS. is easy enough to suss out, especially as the word TRUSS appears further down.  Possibly a shop selling surgical appliances. Anyone with an old Kelly's or White's directory should be able to clarify.

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These are some of the roads which disappeared under the flats. Whether they could or should have been saved might be debatable.   Forest Street.   Lenton Street.  

I moved to Hyson Green in 1949 as a 4 year old to Craven Street to be more precise. We moved to be near my grandmother and the rest of the Beal family who lived on Berridge Road and Hazelwood Road. It

https://flashbak.com/splendid-20th-century-pictures-of-british-woolworths-383793/     Some wonderful photos on here, showing those very lights in operation and the old fashioned counters wit

I think someone has already highlighted some of the letters as they stand out too much in the photo, there was a Mapperley photo which had also been similarly touched up.

I think there's an apostrophe on the shop name (unless it's a brand name) HULME'S

 

       _AIR_YE

ALL COLOURS

FOR ALL AGES

 

Bottles _ _ _ _ _ _

 

      WORKING MAN'S

               TRUSS

SELF FITTING RELIABLE  (presumably trusses for non working men are fitted for them by others???)

 

Here's an enlarged snip, it blurs too much if elarged more,

 

83gOmEu.png

 

 

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19 hours ago, Jill Sparrow said:

https://flashbak.com/splendid-20th-century-pictures-of-british-woolworths-383793/  

Some wonderful photos on here, showing those very lights in operation and the old fashioned counters with the glass edges. I can almost smell the biscuits!

 

Visible in a couple of the interior photos is a reminder of the days before self-service, when every counter had a separate assistant and cash register. 

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FOR ALL AGES

 

I'll wager they didn't do purple, pink and turquoise, so often seen today!

 

Radford Road Woolies was L shaped (albeit inverted). The L shaped bit must have run behind Boot's. Round that corner were such things as firelighters, companion sets and bundles of sticks. It had a distinctive smell, that corner.

 

At Christmas, the loose cards were piled up on a counter just before the right turn into that corner.  If I shut my eyes, I can still walk through the doors of Woolies, past the row of parked coachbuilt prams and go right round the store.  It was never the same once it went self service.

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23 hours ago, Stavertongirl said:

member of staff cut herself very badly on the bacon slicer

 

Boots sold bacon? 

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I'm sure they may have done that. In those days and for many years afterwards, people took their own containers to be filled with whatever they needed, whether it be Friday night faggots* and gravy or loose sherry. It is only recent generations who can't/won't make do and mend or reuse existing materials, thus creating the throw away society and its ensuing mess.

 

However, in the case of the writing on this particular wall, there appear to be indications of perhaps two sizes of bottle, hence:   /    &    /

 

The prices are missing....but I'm sure our Ben can tell us what they were!

 

*for the benefit of overseas readers Faggots, in this context, refers to a savoury meat dish which vegetarians like myself don't eat!  Just thought I'd clear up any confusion.

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I moved to Hyson Green in 1949 as a 4 year old to Craven Street to be more precise. We moved to be near my grandmother and the rest of the Beal family who lived on Berridge Road and Hazelwood Road. It was reckoned to be a rough area mainly because of the Lenton Street slums which nostalgia aside were dreadful. The flats that were built to replace them quickly turned into modern slums. 

The area of Hyson Green down from Radford Road to Berridge Schol seemed to be made up of small communities all looking after each other. My introduction to Hyson Green was to see two pair of eyes looking through our flip up letterbox, Tony Durham and Owen Evans. We three spent many a happy hour playing all sorts of games in the street. The Durham's amazed me as 3 boys 2 girls and mum and dad (yes 7 in total) lived in a 2 up 2 down terraced house with an outside loo. 

Aunt Kit lived next door to us with husband Reg Stokes. Aunt Kit (she was not an aunt it was just what everyone called her) could not have children so basically adopted the kids from the street.  She seemed to have an endless sully of sweets. 

The Henshaw's lived across the street 2 boys 2 girls and mum and dad again in a 2 up 2 down. 

In the next street over Eric Herrod has his own little gang that would raid other streets to make a nuisance of themselves. 

Hyson Green Boys Club was our go to place. I started there as a 13 year old and eventually became one of the staff only leaving when I got married as a 26 year old. Lots of stories about the staff and members if anyone is interested. 

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We're interested, Geoff!

 

Hazelwood Road housed many of my peers at Berridge. Most of the houses had no bathrooms and the loo was outside. No gardens, either. However, the houses were clean, tidy and well cared for with doorsteps scrubbed and donkey stoned to immaculate condition.

 

I walked down there for the first time in many years in March 2019. Appalling! It was never an affluent area but I was really upset by what I saw.

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52 minutes ago, Geoffc said:

Aunt Kit lived next door to us with husband Reg Stokes. Aunt Kit (she was not an aunt it was just what everyone called her)

 

You weren't alone in that situation. Everybody had aunts who weren't really aunts.

 

I remember a person named Auntie Rose who lived near us on Clifton. She was a friend of my mother, but was always referred to as Auntie Rose. I never understood why some people were made honorary aunts, but others  just remained plain Mrs xxx.

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As a kid I had 1 or 2 'uncles', but that's a story I wouldn't wish to air on this channel. My childhood was crap without adding to it !

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My childhood was blissful..and all Uncles and Aunts were real ones.......All other Adults were Mr or Mrs......or Sir and Madam at Marsdens...........

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Hyson Green Boys Club started out in an old Methodist chapel on Archer Street.   Just before I joined in 1958 (I think because all were welcome) Reg Jones became the youth leader there, Skip we used to call him.   He revitalised the club and really got it going.   When they cleared the Lenton Street slums they took down the chapel as well.   However, the boys club was given some land and Skip organised a large loan to have a new building put up.   I remember helping to dig footings in fact a whole lot of the members of the club helped to build the place by doing unskilled donkey work.   Now some names from that time.   Dave Searcy who went to Forest Fields grammar and eventually became an electrician down the mines.   Johnny Rippin who went out with Viv Green and I think he joined the marines.   Rodney Blatherwick who was a member for a time but then left I think because he lived a long way away.   David Bullous who played a lot of basketball at the club.   His older brother Pete was the local hard man who took the job of a caretaker at a local school and became something of a hero protecting the children there and basically becoming an uncle.   Nev  something coached table tennis which was quite strong at the club with the star player Barry --- who also played for the county.   Perhaps other can add to this.

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What a good memory you have for names, Geoff.  The youth club sounds like it was a popular place to go.

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I'm wondering...and letsavagoo will be wondering too, no doubt...whether Dave Searcy was related to the Searcy who ran an electrical shop on Alfreton Road, more or less opposite Grundy Street?  He was a bit of a miserable s*d, old Searcy but he was there for many years.

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I moved to Hyson Green in 1949 as a 4 year old to Craven Street to be more precise. We moved to be near my grandmother and the rest of the Beal family who lived on Berridge Road and Hazelwood Road. It was reckoned to be a rough area mainly because of the Lenton Street slums which nostalgia aside were dreadful. The flats that were built to replace them quickly turned into modern slums. 

The area of Hyson Green down from Radford Road to Berridge Schol seemed to be made up of small communities all looking after each other. My introduction to Hyson Green was to see two pair of eyes looking through our flip up letterbox, Tony Durham and Owen Evans. We three spent many a happy hour playing all sorts of games in the street. The Durham's amazed me as 3 boys 2 girls and mum and dad (yes 7 in total) lived in a 2 up 2 down terraced house with an outside loo. 

Aunt Kit lived next door to us with husband Reg Stokes. Aunt Kit (she was not an aunt it was just what everyone called her) could not have children so basically adopted the kids from the street.  She seemed to have an endless sully of sweets. 

The Henshaw's lived across the street 2 boys 2 girls and mum and dad again in a 2 up 2 down. 

In the next street over Eric Herrod has his own little gang that would raid other streets to make a nuisance of themselves. 

Hyson Green Boys Club was our go to place. I started there as a 13 year old and eventually became one of the staff only leaving when I got married as a 26 year old. Lots of stories about the staff and members if anyone is interested. 

 

There was a whole batch of Searcy's on Hyson Green all related.  With regard to Hazelwood Road, I wonder if you remember Arthur and Evelyn Beal who had twin boys John and Mike.  I think the boys were born in 1942.

The boys club was very popular.   There was also a girls club again in an old Methodist Chapel on Gregory Boulevard. When you went to Manning you probably walked past it. 

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I did, Geoff. In the last year of Berridge, 1968/9, I went there with a friend and we used to play badminton. I know there were a number of Searcys in the area. Not sure where the chap who owned Searcy Electrical fits in.

 

Re Hyson Green Boys' Club, they were involved in the Nottingham Youth Drama Festival in 1969 under the direction of Cyril Potts. By 1970, they aren't listed according to my programmes.

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I wonder, I used to play badminton at the girls club as well. There was a slim blonde girl who was quite good who I both played with and against. I used to use my 6ft 4in height to good advantage. We're you that petite blonde girl? 

With regard to the boys club I worked with Cyril on the drama festival performances. We ended up winning the local, regional competitions and got to put on a performance at the Royal Festival Hall. The dramatic ending was hanging someone on stage (safely I might add). Pat Gibbons was the victim and David Bullous was the accidental executioner. I built the rig that suspended Pat on stage. 

The table tennis player who represented the County for quite a time was Barry Sharp. He went out with Betty Green and looked like marrying her. Ring any bells? 

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I was never any use at badminton. It wasn't me: I'm dark haired (before I went white!!!!) and dark eyed.

 

The drama festivals were good fun. I was a member of the Cooperative Arts Theatre Youth Group. We were all up against the excellent Meadows Boys Club drama group run by the highly talented John Shooter. He did wonders with those lads.  Happy days!

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Testing my memory, Meadows Boys Club put on Under Milk Wood one year, probably mid 60's where the key role is tha narrator in this case a teenage boy who was absolutely brilliant. They won all the awards that year. The teenager was going on to be a professional actor.  Can anyone rember him and what happened to him. 

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I still have the programmes for 1969 and 1970.

 

In 1969 Meadows Boys put on Dylan Thomas's Return Journey.the Narrator was David Holmes.

 

In 1970, their entry was Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare. David Holmes played the role of Cassius.

 

I saw both and they were excellent.

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